How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.

How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.
How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.

So a fortnight (two weeks) ago, I told you about how many countries that I travelled to in 2016. And if you’re just joining us, it was 10!

I also told you how I did it, and the plans that I have for 2017. 

In 2016, I’ll be travelling to thirteen (13) countries.

Most of them will be in Europe, and plenty of them, I’ll be reaching by train!

How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.
How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.

But why?

Why the train?

Why not fly?

Why not fly?
Why not fly?

Well, to Russia, I’m thinking strongly of taking some sort of ship or cruise, and to England and Ireland, perhaps flying would be quicker….!

And then again. Perhaps not!

But the fact remains.

I live in Berlin.

In Germany.

Germany - my adopted country!
Germany – my adopted country!

And Germany is right in the center of Europe.

It has airports, train stations, bus stations, bicycle stations, cars and every possible means of transport.

I travel a lot for leisure and pleasure, and many a time, the adventure is in the getting there rather than the destination itself!

Zoooooop! Don't say it! @eatdrinkandrun.com
Zoooooop! Don’t say it!
@eatdrinkandrun.com

And let’s not forget the hassle, long queues and stringent baggage requirements that airlines require these days. Quite frankly, for a 1.5 hour flight you’re looking at arriving the airport (if flying to the UK) at least 2 hours before, if flying inter-continental, at least 3 hours. Not to talk of actually getting to the airport itself!

Luckily for me, Berlin has excellent local public transport that is cheap, efficient, clean, and reliable. I can’t say the same if you’re trying to get to London Heathrow, which is the busiest airport in the world. And equally as complicated, if you don’t know your way around London.

Me!
Me!

Being that I live in Berlin, makes it an extremely easy way to travel.

In fact, travelling by train through the European continent is one of the most comfortable ways to travel with ease, from one country to the other. And by far, one of the cheapest!

Is it any wonder that one of my favourite forms of transport is the train!

WHY TRAVEL BY TRAIN IN EUROPE?

How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.
How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.

There are many reasons why travelling by train in Europe is a most excellent idea, here are some below:

  • It’s cheap:
Travelling by train is a cheap as a bunch of locally grown flowers!
Travelling by train is a cheap as a bunch of locally grown flowers!

I bought a twelve-hour (12) direct train ticket from Berlin to Budapest. In first class for €69.00. Second class was just €10.00 cheaper at €59.00! I couldn’t believe it, so I bought it! My child was free of charge!

I bought a seven (7) hour train journey (second class) train ticket via the Hungarian Railways or MAV at a cost of 11,780 Ft or €38.40 to travel from Budapest to Prague. Child included in the cost!

A five (5) hour train journey ticket (second class) to travel from Prague to Berlin in August, was just €29.00! My child cost nothing at all!

Over the Landwasser Viaduct in Switzerland. ©Michaa Ludwiczak / Getty
Over the Landwasser Viaduct in Switzerland.
©Michaa Ludwiczak / Getty

For Switzerland, we took the Sparpreis Europa city night line train, and the eleven (11) hour return ticket journey from Berlin – Lucerne – Berlin, including reserved seating in July. Cost just €98.00. My child was free!

As a matter of fact, our return ticket from Berlin – Copenhagen – Berlin was a mere €58.00! And even though we actually missed our connection on the way home, and had to buy another ticket…it was still a sweet deal!

  • Kids travel for free:
Children under 15 travelling inter-city or inter-country, with their relatives, usually travel on the European train, for free!
Children under 15 travelling inter-city or inter-country, with their relatives, usually travel on the European train, for free!

Throughout last summer, I took an international train every weekend, and the price for our son – The Tall Young Gentleman was nothing at all!

His fare was completely and utterly free.

Yep!

Free of charge.

Nada!

Children under 15 travelling inter-city or inter-country, with their relatives, usually travel on the European train, for free!
Children under 15 travelling inter-city or inter-country, with their relatives, usually travel on the European train, for free!

In Germany, children under 15 travelling inter-city or inter-country, with their parents, grandparents, or relatives, travel on the German Rail, otherwise known as Deutsche Bahn (DB), train for free!

Note that if you book Spar Preis Europa trains with the German Rail on this version, your children will be free of charge too!

Other European countries do the same and either have free transport for children, or special prices for families too.

In Stellshagen – Mecklenburg-Vorpommern – Germany.
Our son as a baby – 20 months old!

On our last visit to the UK, we bought an Advance Single train ticket – via the National Rail – from Manchester Oxford Road to a station in Cheshire. Our adult tickets for a 30 minute inter-city train were £3.00 each, and £1.50 for our child. Our Express Train tickets from Manchester Airport to Manchester Oxford Road (in the city) were just £5.00 each per adult, and £2.50 for our child.

  • Delays are minimal and compensated:
The German Rail / Deutsche Bahn train leaving Berlin.
The German Rail / Deutsche Bahn train leaving Berlin.

When travelling by European train, there is very little fuss to it, and far fewer delays than flying

In fact, European Regulation (EC) 1371/2007 on rail passengers’ rights and obligations (2009), state that passengers are entitled to standardised rights in the rail sector in Germany and in Europe.

If there are delays of at least sixty (60) minutes or more, you are entitled to compensation, and if you were to take a taxi, or another mode of transport up to €80.00, you could have that refunded too. Make sure you get the correct documentation at either the train station concerned, from another station, or from the train staff!

  • Luggage:
Get a train ticket and travel through Europe!
Get a train ticket and travel through Europe!

Train travel means that there is plenty of room for your luggage. And if you wished to take the kitchen sink with you (within reason), you probably could. No need to worry about how heavy your luggage would be and how much. There is relatively little or no fuss. In many cases, the railway staff would even help you carry your bags!

No when was the last time that you saw airport staff carry luggage for anyone!

  • Personal space:
You can strech your legs in the corridor of the Polish Train.
You can stretch your legs in the corridor of the Polish Train.

Unlike air or bus travel, there is room to move around, and really stretch your legs. And depending on how long the journey is, they sometimes have some dedicated time for passengers to go outside, buy some refreshments, get some fresh air, take photographs, or get some WiFi!

  • The social factor:
On the Czech-infused train from Berlin to Budapest!
On the Czech-infused train from Berlin to Budapest!

The European train is a little like the Indian train in the sense that you actually get to meet people. And talk to them.

I mean, you’re sitting elbow to elbow, you’re probably going to an international country, the passengers are either locals or tourists themselves, and to be frank, everyone is quite interested in your journey. And if you’ve got a bottle of booze somewhere.

All the better!

So now to the real McCoy!

HOW TO USE THE TRAIN IN EUROPE: 10 TIPS TO HELP YOU

How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.
How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.

Depending on where you are coming from, you need to:

1.  Get a train ticket:

Get a train ticket and travel through Europe!
Get a train ticket and travel through Europe!

The cheapest way to ease into buying train tickets through most European countries (not all), is to actually book through the Deutsche Bahn portal on the local German English version not the UK or USA version! Note that for Germany, Austria, Belgium, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Holland, Italy, Luxembourg, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden and Switzerland, if you’re going by train, I don’t recommend that you do so by InterRail or EuroRail passes, if you’re only travelling to one country, as the prices are ridiculously expensive and children have to be paid for!

The snag is to book tickets with the national train companies, directly. On their own websites, or through the German Rail otherwise known as Deutsche Bahn. Most websites have an English version. Some can be admittedly slightly hidden, but persevere, or contact them directly by calling, or via Email!

Get a train ticket and travel through Europe!
Get a train ticket and travel through Europe!

But don’t forget. Not all train companies allow you to pay online, or even to buy local tickets at local prices! Some train companies only allow you to buy a Eurail ticket if you’re buying from abroad, and which you can only pay for with a credit card. For more info on that check here..  And some do, but you either have to buy the ticket on the train, or have to pay online and then collect the train tickets once you’re in the country itself, or change the language of the website!

For train travel all around the world check out the website of The Man in Seat Sixty-One . . . or Deutsche Bahn.

A goat on the train? Ah well, anything can happen. I've seen worse. Swans for example!
A goat on the train? Ah well, anything can happen. I’ve seen worse.
Swans for example!

But remember, if you’re using the Deutsche Bahn website, change the location to Germany and use the English word for Deutschland which is Germany! NOT the UK/Ireland one! And then change the language to English!

2.  Check online for best routes:

A map of the European High - Speed Train Network!
A map of the European High – Speed Train Network!

Many train companies have their own website which you can access for routes so that you can see where you want to go. Or better yet. Where they actually go, and how to get there!

3.  Do your research:

Do you need to get a bus and then the train? Or vice-versa in Barcelona. Spain?
Do you need to get a bus and then the train? Or vice-versa in Barcelona. Spain?

I live in Berlin and the Polish border is just under two hours away as such, there are discount prices from the German Railway Service known as Deutsche Bahn or DB. You can get a one-way single ticket from Berlin to Stettin or Szczecin in Poland, for just €11.00. Reduced tickets for €8.30. If you want to make a day of it, a day ticket would be €22.00 and €16.60 respectively. You could use it for every local transport in Stettin and the ticket is valid until 03:00 the next day!

Or you could get the German Regional tickets also known as the Länder-Tickets. These are fantastic bargains as the Berlin-Brandenburg regional one day ticket is only €29.00 and can be used by up to 5 people! That’s right! 5 people can travel on this ticket and they don’t have to be related! This ticket is valid from 09:00 to 03:00 the following day, and on the trams and buses in Stettin (Szczecin), and can be used to get to the Polish border!

Yeah well, no promises on the Bogus Bus!
Yeah well, no promises on the Bogus Bus!

You sometimes see people hustling for ticket holders in Stettin (Szczecin) ‘cos if you have 5 people travelling together that’s €5.00 each. A bargain if ever I saw one!

You can get this ticket from the VBB Verkehrsverbund Berlin-Brandenburg website or DB online. For more information check here and here.

4.  In fact, if you are in Germany, why not hop to some of our neighbouring countries too:

"The Tall Young Gentleman" didn't look too happy that for Switzerland, we took the Sparpreis Europa city night line train!
“The Tall Young Gentleman” didn’t look too happy that for Switzerland, we took the Sparpreis Europa city night line train!

It might take you a while, but you can take the train from Berlin to London for as little as €59.00, to Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Italy, Denmark, Croatia, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, Slovakia, and Poland for as little as €39.00 per single ticket or one way trip!

And if it’s not too far away. And being that this is Europe we’re talking about, so it isn’t! Fares can sometimes go as low as €19.00 for destinations such as to Prague for example!

The Deutsche Bahn building in Berlin!
The Deutsche Bahn building in Berlin!

For more information check here.

5.  Reserve your seat:

Me relaxing at the Berlin Music Video Awards.
Me relaxing at the Berlin Music Video Awards.

Now as a blogger, I’m always online in some form or the other, and it really surprises me how travellers and tourists leave their train bookings until the very last minute!

Believe me. Don’t do that!

It was lovely having a Bristol cab and driver waiting for me!
It was lovely having a Bristol cab and driver waiting for me!

Trains are popular in Europe. And if the destination is on a well-worn track, then the trains will be packed. And if it’s the weekend or a public holiday, you won’t get a seat, and will be forced to stand….!

In the summer, it’s not unknown for teenagers to be sitting on the corridor floor with their mates for a few hours.

But they can cope. Can you?

Try to reserve a seat on the European train!
Try to reserve a seat on the European train!

Now if you really don’t want to pay for a reserved seat, then the trick is to either go to the very front of the train, or the very back of it. And be quick about it!

However, if you’ve got luggage or kids, somebody from your party ought to sprint in and bagsy a couple of non-reserved  seats, or you might as well do the decent relaxing thing, and reserve the seat of your choice, in a compartment that you prefer.

Our tiny Czech train in the middle of no-where!
Our tiny Czech train in the middle of no-where!

Having said that, lots of small rural or regional trains have no possibility to reserve seats at all, so either jump in and turn left, or go upstairs!

6.  Take some refreshments with you:

Take some refreshments with you!
Take some refreshments with you!

If you’re on a regional or rural train, no refreshments will be sold on the train. And don’t even think that you can buy “something” at the next station as countryside train stations are either tiny little things, or simply non-existent!

Generally, super-clean-fast-efficient-modern-high speed trains have restaurants and trolley service throughout the train, but you can’t be sure that you’ll like either what they’re offering, or the prices!

Refreshments on the European first class train usually include a small bottle of wine or beer. But not always!
Refreshments on the European first class train usually include a small bottle of wine or beer. But not always!

‘Best to bring your own stuff if travelling in second class. Refreshments are usually given for first class customers and usually include a small bottle of wine or beer. But not always!

7.  Talk to the locals:

Don't be afraid to talk to locals or your fellow travellers on the European train!
Don’t be afraid to talk to locals or your fellow travellers on the European train!

My fellow travellers were always very helpful and we usually spoke in a mixture of English or German and a splattering of whatever the local language happens to be. With a lot of hand gestures, acting, drawing, and generally making quite a fool of myself, they usually understood what I was asking! The local travellers always helped us get off at the stop that we usually required too.

Many a time just looking anxious, or “other,” tends to open a conversation. And really, you don’t ever have to worry. The locals will help you. Just ask. Promise!

The locals will help you. Just ask. Promise!
The locals will help you. Just ask.
Promise!

In some cases, even the train driver will help you!

8.  Be prepared:

Have the correct documentation with you when travelling on the European train, and be prepared!
Have the correct documentation with you when travelling on the European train, and be prepared!

When travelling through Europe, you’re likely to go through different countries, each with it’s own distinct flavour of technology. In highly advanced countries such as Germany, Switzerland, Holland, and the Nordic countries, technical equipment will be at it’s highest, with power outlets either in between your seats, on the table, or on the side of the wall near the window!

In less advanced nations such as in Eastern Europe and even in Southern Europe, not so much!

There might be wifi and a power outlet. And there might not!
There might be WiFi and a power outlet. And there might not!

There will be WiFi, but it probably won’t work, or will be spotty at best. And there will be no power outlets! On our 15-hour train journey to Hungary, I spent hours searching the train for a plug-hole. And where was it?

In the restaurant, hanging dangerously on the wall of the heavy main train door, or in the toilet!

Er No!

Have the correct documentation with you when travelling on the European train, and be prepared!
Have the correct documentation with you when travelling on the European train, and be prepared!

Oh by the way. Europe isn’t a country. It’s a continent, so if you’re travelling on an international train, you must take your passport with you!

Train officials never used to check people in the past due to the European law of Free Movement, but as a result of strengthened alertness due to the increased height of terrorism, and to ensure our safety, they are now. So make sure you have everything in order.

Otherwise, you’ll be escorted off the train and your holiday could end right there!

9.  If you miss your train stop, don’t panic:

How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you - don't panic!
How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you – don’t panic!

Once travelling through Poland, I realized that we had missed our train stop as the countryside scene that was I expecting, did not show up on my horizon!

Hmm!

I couldn’t really look outside the window as the window was blocked with passengers in the corridor.

I couldn’t check the train map that you normally see in the corridors either as I couldn’t get to the corridor, and I didn’t have an iPhone in those days.

We had missed our train stop! Oh no!
We had missed our train stop! Oh no!

A girl in her early 20’s noticed that I kept attempting to leave the compartment. She confirmed that I had missed our stop.

OK. I’ll get off at the next stop!

Oh, I’ve missed that too!

And the train is now going East further into Poland, whereas I was supposed to be going to the sea which was in the West!

We got off the train!
We got off the train!

We got off the train.

Unfortunately, the train officials weren’t really very helpful and pointed at contrasting directions, so I decided to look around the station myself and peek onto other platforms and lo and behold, the connecting train that I wanted was still ON THE PLATFORM!

I checked and double-checked that it was indeed the right train, then we hopped on!

Then we hopped back on the train again!
Then we hopped back on the train again!

I so bugged the train conductor as per how many stops we had left, and what time we were expected to get to a certain seaside village, as there are no announcements and no destination indicators.

It was a case of watching and counting, each and every train stop…. 75 minutes later, we were there!

10.  If it all goes bananas, use your head:

Use your head at foreign train stations!
Use your head at foreign train stations!

There are 101 ways to travel through Europe, and the train is just one of them.

Sometimes it makes sense to choose another form of transport to get to your final destination.

It isn’t the worse thing in the world if you do!

HOW TO USE THE TRAIN IN EUROPE: 10 TIPS TO HELP YOU

How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.
How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.

This article is not sponsored, and the excitement of using the train in Europe, is my very own!

For travelling across Europe, or from Germany, please contact: Deutsche Bahn or take a look at my country destination page and book your hotel here!

It’s January!

I’ll be making an announcement this month that will either having me jumping up and down like a Jack-in-the-Box, or crying over my hot cocoa! Find out throughout January!

The 10th British Shorts Film Festival is taking place from 12th – 18th January, 2017

Berlin Fashion Week will take place from 17th –  20th January, 2017

The British Council Literature Seminar – #BritLitBerlin – will take place from 26.01.17 – 28.01.17

The 67th Berlin International Film Festival, otherwise known as the Berlinale, will take place from 09.02.17 – 19.02.17

Strictly Stand Up – The English Comedy Night will take place at the Quatsch comedy Club on 15.02.17. Save the Date!

If you’re not in Berlin in January, it’s a darn shame!

January is going to be dramatic!

How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.
How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.
How to use the train in Europe: 10 tips to help you.

Have you ever used the train across Europe? What are your stories? Spill the beans!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!

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A 5 minute introduction to Warsaw. That’s in Poland didn’t you know!

Warsaw - the capital of Poland!
Warsaw – the capital of Poland!

Well! Well! Well!

I went to Warsaw.

To be clear, Berlin will always be my first (1st) love so nothing is going to take that away not even lovely Prague, but it’s nice to see the competition LOL!

If you recall, I wrote a post a year ago about how to party in Berlin and another piece called If you’re going to dance the night away – Do it in Berlin so I know what I’m talking about!

Whoopee! Yeeks. That was some week!

I’ll be writing about the party spots of Warsaw very soon LOL!

At Zalando Fashion House/ i.D /Not Just a Label - Berlin Fashion Week.
At Zalando Fashion House/ i.D /Not Just a Label – Berlin Fashion Week.

From the moment I got off the train in Warsaw, to the moment that I stepped forward onto the bohemian mecca of Nowy Świat, Warsaw has been nothing but an utter surprise.

And the locals have been fantastically pleasant and helpful.

Right!

Where to start.

Warsaw is much bigger than you think because really cool locations are scattered about. Warsaw is, on the other hand, pretty easy to get around so follow my footsteps and don’t just talk the talk but walk the walk too!

WHY GO TO WARSAW?

War monument in Warsaw.
War monument in Warsaw.

Yeah, why bother?

After all, Warsaw isn’t gorgeous like Riga. It isn’t romantic like Prague or exciting like Budapest.

It doesn’t have a proper beach and it isn’t as pretty as the lovely seaside villages.

And yet?

Yet!

Warsaw is something else.

Warsaw is old and historic with culture.

The Palace of Culture & Science in Warsaw, Poland.
The Palace of Culture & Science in Warsaw, Poland.

It’s in the “other” Eastern Europe. It’s still pretty unknown, very former “East” and not really on the backpackers or tourist run, so it’s pretty cheap and is never going to break the bank. If you’re looking to go to the Eastern or former Soviet States then of course, you have to pass through Poland at some point. For many, it’s Krakow, but if you’re in Poland anyway, why not drop into Warsaw too!

It’s also a “new” city with young people and a lively heart of art, food and drink because Warsaw has had to start from scratch as it was razed to the ground towards the end of WWII.

I was pleased to hear that Warsaw locals love visiting and living in Berlin as Berlin is a city of tolerance and individuality, but relations between Germany and Poland are still rather prickly.

Yes, Warsaw is ugly however, if you look behind the skyscrapers, there’s a synagogue. If you look between the cheap, horrific 1950’s block of flats, there’s a lively church.

It’s no wonder that the locals recommend getting a guide. Everything of interest is hidden.

Book your hotel here!

Pegasus in Warsaw, Poland.
Pegasus in Warsaw, Poland.

Items of modern art are everywhere and sometimes in the most unlikely places with strange items like Pegasus, and stone or iron monuments of war and remembrance.

Chopin is a god in Warsaw. His face, his name, his memory and of course, his music. You can even sit on a bench and his music is played. Very relaxing!

Oh yeah, it’s cheap. Not as cheap as Lithuania of course.

Unless you come from Cardiff LOL!

More about that next week!!!!!

Because cabbage, sausages and dumplings, otherwise known as pierogi!

TAKE ME THERE?

The Berlin Warsaw Express train in Poland.
The Berlin Warsaw Express train in Poland.

You know how much I like trains. They’re just so comfortable and full of ease. And if you’re on the European Continent, it’s the easiest and sometimes, cheapest way to travel.

If you’re going to Britain or any English-speaking country, I recommend flying!

Most airlines will be flying into Chopin Airport with a minority flying into Warsaw Modlin Airport. Once you get in, take the buses. There are five (5) bus lines taking you into the city centre. Try to avoid taxis or ask your hotel/hostel for help as to the “right” taxi to take. Warsaw has a reputation of dodgy drivers but then so does Bangkok! Just keep your wits about you.

If you’re coming in by coach-bus, you’ll most likely drop off at Warszawa Zachodnia which is on the other side of the river. In a place called Ochota.

Once again, I booked the very easy-to-use Deutsche Bahn – German Train and it was a rather nice €29.00 each way for a five (5) hour and 15 minutes journey. It was on the second (2nd) class train and I bought my ticket in September. There is WiFi on board and you get offered a cup of coffee or tea. Absolutely free!

You really couldn’t get any better than that!

My carriage mates came from Thailand, Poland and Britain (myself) and even though our compartment was fully booked, the rest of the train was pretty empty until we got to Poland itself! All the women brought their own food with them and at some point, one person even had a home-made meal of chicken and a bowl of dumplings. I felt pretty boring with my pâté and ham & cheese sandwich!

You will most likely alight at Warszaw Centralna which is in an area called CENTRUM. You can also buy your ticket on the Polish inter-city train (ICCC) website.

IS IT GOING TO BE CROWDED?

Birds in Poland.
Birds in Poland.

Not really!

Warsaw isn’t an OMG-we-have-just-got-to-go-visit destination. Not yet anyway, but only because the throngs of communist times are still very much attached to the post-war image of Warsaw.

Warsaw isn’t big in my opinion. It’s wide but really walkable. I was able to walk from Muranow (where the Jewish History Museum is) to Ujazdow (where my hotel was). It was low season and the weather was really rather nice, sunny and dry.

In October!

WHAT IS WARSAW REALLY LIKE?

Myself and Polish university students dressed in traditional clothing. In Warsaw!
Myself and Polish university students dressed in traditional clothing. In Warsaw!

I was in Warsaw for four (4) days and it’s definitely a city that I would like to visit again.

I found Warsaw to be different to what I expected and in some parts it reminded me of Berlin. The people are authentic and tell it like it is but it’s definitely Polish because the natives don’t talk a lot about the capital. You would even think that they hated it, but secretly, I think  they’re proud of their roots and foundation.

Most people are traditional at heart and the church plays a very strong role in Polish society as does the family. Everywhere I looked were collections of lit tea-light candles and flowers put on the ground. (Does anyone know why?). Photographs of the Fallen during the 1944 Warsaw Uprising and Old Art depicting what Warsaw used to look like 100 – 200 years ago.

Having said that, although Warsaw and in fact Poland, is extremely homogeneous and limited in diversity, it’s not without culture. There is no doubt that Warsaw is a cosmopolitan city.

Veganism has arrived with a crash and a bang, posh shops are “in,” fashion skinny men with their equally fashion skinny dogs, Paris-slim attractive women and the lure of organic food.

The young and middle-class have a rising income, are very interested in new designs and modern art, look good, dress well, know how to party, and want to spend their money.

Book your hotel here!

I DON’T SPEAK POLISH.

If you can't speak Polish, sing and dance instead!
If you can’t speak Polish, sing and dance instead!

Umm!

In the really local places like the milk bar, nobody spoke anything else. BUT there was always at least one (1) person who could help me and that person was usually between 50 – 70 years old LOL! There was a bit of staring.

OK then, a lot of staring!

But it was due to the shock of seeing a person of colour wearing a pink coat, multi-coloured pop socks, and orange suede shoes walking down the street!

On a serious note, young people do speak English and I had no problems walking up to random people and asking for help, advice or directions. Some people even asked me for a photograph.

I obliged.

They were from The Ukraine!

AM I GOING TO LIVE IN A HUT?

#RefugeesAreWelcome even in Poland!
Warsaw might be homogeneous but #RefugeesAreWelcome even in Poland!

Nah! Warsaw might be a country from “the other” Eastern Europe but you’re definitely not going to be living in a cave!

I’M ON A BUDGET. WHAT SHOULD I DO?

Patchwork Design Hotel in Warsaw.
Patchwork Design Hotel in Warsaw.

There are plenty of hostels to be had.

Since I was travelling solo this time around, I decided to spend one (1) night at a hostel.

If you want to party, I’m told that Okidoki Hostel is the place to be but I just couldn’t do it to myself. I still have vivid memories of discovering a complete stranger on my bed, in a mixed dorm. In Prague! Those cheap and cheerful days are terribly over so I chose Patchwork Design Hostel instead which caters to the more budget conscious traveller, is fairly new, clean, right off the corner of Nowy Świat and is quieter!

Book your hostel here!

I’M LOOKING FOR A BIT MORE LUXURY, IS THERE SOMETHING FOR ME?

One of the bedrooms at Autor Rooms in Warsaw, Poland.
One of the bedrooms at Autor Rooms in Warsaw, Poland.

Delightfully so!

I stayed at a rather lovely unique designer boutique hotel called Autor Rooms. The hotel is located in one of Warsaw’s most beautiful and historic kamienica-style residential buildings. It’s right opposite the Faculty of Architecture and is one street behind the Warsaw University of Technology. Autor Rooms is an artistic concept and designed by independent young creatives who come from, and believe in a world of modern fashion, craft, art and design. More details next week!

Book Autor Rooms or your own Warsaw Hotel here!

WHAT ABOUT TRANSPORT POSSIBILITIES?

The Central Station in Warsaw - Dworzec Centralny.
The Central Station in Warsaw – Dworzec Centralny.

Warsaw has plenty of variety and has trains, trams, buses, bikes. I used the bus once while I was in Warsaw but the highlight was the underground station.

OMG! The metro station is amazing. It’s new and just so clean and quiet. The stations were even announced in English. Take note Berlin!!!  I couldn’t believe that the underground train lines were so short. There’s just two (2) lines. TWO! M1 (blue) and M2 (red). You won’t get lost…!

But don’t forget. Don’t take taxis!!

ANYTHING ELSE?

Buckwheat at a milk bar in Warsaw, Poland.
Buckwheat at a milk bar in Warsaw, Poland.

Try a milk bar.

What’s a milk bar? I’ll tell you next week!

Oh, and watch your pockets.

I almost got pick-pocketed by a dodgy-looking Polish couple.

Almost!!!

Luckily, I noticed that the woman was walking at my pace and the man was standing too close to me and so I quickly side-stepped them and then they stood on the cobbled streets and started arguing about it!

Phew!

MY VERDICT:

Me on the riverside in Warsaw, Poland.
Me on the riverside in Warsaw, Poland.

I liked Warsaw.

It’s very, very green and has parks everywhere, it’s young and upcoming and the tourist hordes aren’t yet here which means the prices are cheap and you’re likely to get more of an authentic experience, AND it has a river.

WOULD I COME AGAIN?

Totally!

Book your hotel here!

A 5 MINUTE INTRODUCTION TO WARSAW. THAT’S IN POLAND DIDN’T YOU KNOW!

A 5 minute introduction to Warsaw. That’s in Poland didn’t you know!

This post is not sponsored and even though I received a discount on the hotel, all opinions and the astonishing experience that I had, are my very own!

I have so much to share with you.

Stay tuned!

In the next few weeks, I’ll be writing more about what to do in Warsaw and how to do it!

As usual, you can also follow me via daily tweets and pictures on Twitter & FB!

If you’re going to Warsaw, Bristol or Bath, let me know!

October is going to be Autumny!

Watch this space!

A 5 minute introduction to Warsaw. That’s in Poland didn’t you know!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

A 5 minute introduction to Warsaw. That’s in Poland didn’t you know!

Did you know that Warsaw had a river? Are you surprised about this introductory guide? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you like this post or if you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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I’m going to Budapest & Prague AND taking the train. Yay!

In Prague reading something and looking all serious, but not completely serious!
In Prague reading something and looking all serious, but not completely serious!

In the last fortnight or two weeks, I’ve been telling you all about fashion and I will get back to the juicy bits in a few weeks, but for now, back to basics. Haw! Haw!

Yes, it’s that time of year.

Drum roll pleeeeease!

THE BRITISH BERLINER IS GOING TO BUDAPEST AND PRAGUE. YAY!

 

A map of Berlin to Prague and to Budapest

Shiver me timbers!

WHERE AM I GOING EXACTLY?

 

It's not really relevant but at least he's travelling! Photo@ Peter Stigter
It’s not really relevant but at least he’s travelling!
Photo@ Peter Stigter

Well, you know me. Never the easy option!

I am travelling from Berlin to Budapest. From Budapest to Prague. And then from Prague back to Berlin again. Many people do it the other way around but I’m not many people LOL!

I’m going to Hungary and the Czech Republic and I’m going there by the train!

HUNGARY

Budapest Spring  Fair 2015
Budapest Spring Fair 2015

Hungary, also known as the Republic of Hungary is a country in Eastern Europe and thus a part of the old Eastern Bloc!

It is technically situated in Central Europe and is surrounded by Slovakia, Romania, Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia (not to be confused with Slovakia), Austria and the Ukraine! I will be going to Budapest which is the capital city and considered one of the most beautiful cities in Europe surrounded by the river Danube and divided into two lovely parts known unsurprisingly as Buda and Pest!

Look at the glamour of the Buddha-Bar Hotel Budapest Klotild Palace or simply, the Buddha-Bar Hotel in Budapest!
Look at the glamour of the Buddha-Bar Hotel Budapest Klotild Palace or simply, the Buddha-Bar Hotel in Budapest!

My trip to Budapest is going to be a cultural one so I’ll be travelling with “The Tall Young Gentleman” and we’ll be staying at not only one (1) hotel in Budapest, but two (2)! We’ll be staying firstly at a luxurious, Asian-inspired five-star hotel consisting of one-hundred and two (102) rooms and located at the corner of the famous Váci utca or Váci street which is one of the main pedestrian thoroughfares and perhaps the most famous High Street in Budapest. This chic but luxurious hotel is called the Buddha-Bar Hotel Budapest Klotild Palace or simply the Buddha-Bar Hotel!

Next to the St. Stephen's Basilica - Aria Hotel Budapest.
Next to the St. Stephen’s Basilica – Aria Hotel Budapest.

We will then transfer a few days later and we’ll be staying at the beautiful boutique and musically inspired five-star hotel consisting of just forty-nine (49) guest rooms and suites, and located in the historic centre of Pest right next to the St. Stephen’s Basilica. This stylish hotel is called Aria Hotel Budapest.

I simply can’t keep my breath in!

THE CZECH REPUBLIC

The most wonderful medieval Prague astronomical clock! In the Czech Republic.
The most wonderful medieval Prague astronomical clock!

I have written plenty about the Czech Republic because back in the day, I used to live there and it still remains one of my most favourite countries.

I love the Czech Republic so much that we always try to go to Prague every couple of years and my favourite skiing destination is also in this rather wonderful country. In fact, I wrote quite a few things about the various ski slopes that you can go to and how one year, I pretty much only ate fried cheese and fell off the ski-lift! For more information, check out the links below:

Smažený sýr or Czech fried cheese!
Smažený sýr or Czech fried cheese!

Anyhoo, the Czech Republic.

You know. Previously known as Czechoslovakia.

What again?

The Czech Republic!!

Outside the most beautiful Staroměstská or Old Town Square. In Prague, the Czech Republic.
Outside the most beautiful Staroměstská or Old Town Square. In Prague.

Oh yeah, the Czech Republic is another previously Eastern Europe nation behind the Iron Curtain! After the Fall of the Berlin Wall, Czechoslovakia decided to split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The country is also technically situated in Central Europe and surrounded by Germany, Austria, Slovakia (not Slovenia. Think Czechooooooooslovakia!) and Poland. We will of course, be going to Prague which is the capital city. How could we not?

Everybody likes Prague! It’s just so. so. so….

…classically European!

A knight on Wenceslas Square - Prague.
A knight on Wenceslas Square – Prague.

What with all those kings, queens, fighting for kingdoms and holy crusades. It’s the British monarchy all over again. Although of course.

It isn’t.

They have their own rather interesting Bohemian monarchy LOL!

Prague is said to be the “heart of Europe” and sometimes called “the mother of cities.”  Not quite similar to the mother of dragons in the Game of Thrones family saga, but close enough!

I.

Know.

Prague.

It’s beautiful but in the summer months can get crowded, really noisy and sticky. I’m travelling with my I’ve-just-become-a-real-teenager son, so his comfort is of importance.

Cocktails at Angelo Hotel Prague, the Czech Republic
‘Looking forward to mock cocktails at the Angelo Hotel in Prague!

We will be staying at a four-star modern designed hotel on the other side of the Vltava River. Similar to the art design hotel in Helsinki, this hotel is large and has 168 rooms. We chose this spacious hotel as it’s trendy, in a residential quarter and quiet.

I weighed up whether to stay in the centre of Prague or to, unusual for me, choose a place a little further away. I chose further away for a little bit of peace and quiet LOL! The name of the hotel is Angelo Hotel Prague.

I can’t wait to show “The Tall Young Gentleman” my old haunts!

WHY BUDAPEST AND PRAGUE?

 

Budapest Spring Fair 2015
Budapest Spring Fair 2015

The first and only time that I visited Budapest was in 2004. I went with a German girlfriend of mine who wasn’t really interested in the sights, wasn’t really interested in history and wasn’t really interested in walking.

Sigh!

All I remember is the awful monstrosity of a “modern” hotel, a river cruise which was thankfully quite charming, real Hungarian goulash that wasn’t in the least chewy, and nothing at all about the city itself!

This visit is going to change all that.

And as for Prague? I have always had a love affair with that city of charm because after I graduated university, I went to live there!

It was my first real job and it was a high-flying graduate programme.

English in Europe. Courtesy of comedyinfinland.com
English in Europe.
Courtesy of comedyinfinland.com

I didn’t speak Czech or German.

I had never been to Eastern Europe before.

I hadn’t a clue what I was doing, and I wasn’t even getting paid initially!

It was the best thing that I had ever done. I had such a fantastic time, that I stayed on, became the Regional Project Manager and lived there for (2) two years!

St Charles Bridge Prague © Jorge Royan
St Charles Bridge Prague
© Jorge Royan

Prague is both romantic and successful, ancient and modern, cheap but can be horribly expensive.

But the same can be said for Budapest, and therein lies the rub.

These cities are based in Europe and have magnificent stories of richness, history and grandeur.

Both cities are classical beauties.

Both cities have mountains of history.

Both cities are based in Eastern Europe.

Which one shall be the Queen?!

Very inspiring!

HOW AM I TRAVELLING?

In the corridor of the local Polish Train.
In the corridor of the local Polish Train.

We will be travelling by train.

Between Berlin and Budapest, we will be taking the twelve hour (12) German Railway overland train service known as Deutsche Bahn or DB, on a direct train to Budapest.

In first class no less.

Faaaancy.

And the difference in price between the second (2nd) class train and the first (1st) class train was….

Wait for it.

Just €10.00.

Second (2nd) class €59.00 and first (1st) class €69.00.

I booked it immediately LOL!

The Deutsche Bahn train leaving Berlin.
The Deutsche Bahn train leaving Berlin.

Between Budapest and Prague, we will be taking the seven (7) hour train journey (second class this time) via the Hungarian Railways or MAV at a cost of 11,780 Ft or €38.40.

This journey should be interesting. About as interesting as when we went to the Polish country-side by local train too!

Between Prague and Berlin, we will be back on the German Network on a five (5) hour train journey (the usual second class) and don’t forget, even though I’ll be paying €29.00, on the German Deutsche Bahn trains, children under 15 years old, travelling with their relatives, are free and cost nothing at all!

Yeeeeees!

I’m so looking forward to sight-seeing river cruises, perhaps going to the baths.

Perhaps!

A Hungarian bath in Budapest

Gulp!

Rambling through the cobbled streets of both Budapest and Prague, booking a live escape game.

‘Should be thrilling!

Doing a little hiking, visiting some interesting museums that tell us a little of the history and culture, going on a walking tour, stuffing ourselves with marvellous local cuisine, going to the local theatre, watching a film in Hungarian or Czech and generally, just having a great time!

It’s going to be quite an adventure!

This article is part-sponsored by Aria Hotel Budapest, the Buddha-Bar Hotel in Budapest, and Angelo Hotel Prague but all opinions and the exciting time that I’m sure to have, are my very own!

I have so much to share with you.

Next week, I’ll be writing from Budapest!

I’ll be there. Will you?

August is going to be quite the thing.

Watch this space!

Budapest Spring Fair 2015
Budapest Spring Fair 2015

Have you ever been to Hungary? Have you ever been to the Czech Republic? Are you team Budapest or Team Prague? Do you like my new it-took-me-a-few-hours-to-do-all-by-myself-blog-look? Any comments on my fancy logo?

See you in Berlin.

If you like this post or if you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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