A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Food!

Ha!

‘Got your attention didn’t I?!

But seriously, isn’t food a wonderful thing.

Especially German food!

Umm!

Alright then.

Some German food.

Ah.

That’s better!

Food in Germany: 5 of the Best Ever!

So I’ve been writing about Dresden the last few weeks ‘cos of the new job n’ all that. And because I want to provide a resource for those of you thinking of visiting Dresden!

And why not. Oy!

If you’re just coming to The British Berliner for the very first, or forgot about all the previous stuff I wrote on German food, here’s a reminder:

Best German meals to try out in Berlin – Currywurst!

Yum!

WHAT IS SAXON or SÄCHSISCHE FOOD?

A mixed platter of chicken with vegetables & a fried egg on top!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Saxon food is traditional food that stems from Germany!

And yes, it’s stodge by any other name!

Now mind you, when I say Saxon, I’m not referring to the original Anglo-Saxon homeland otherwise known as Old Saxony, but nowadays known as Lower Saxony, or even that of Upper Saxony otherwise known as Obersachsen!

But I’m referring to the Free State of Saxony, otherwise known as Freistaat Sachsen, or simply, Saxony!

All rather confusing!!

Having said that most of their food is pretty similar!

Saxon cuisine is quite hearty and tends to lean towards a lot of beef, potatoes, dumplings, seafood, heavy sauces, bread, a sort of soft-cheese cake, and beer!

I don’t claim to be an expert by any means, so I’ll just show you what we ate and drank, and where to get them!

Be German. Drink up at Oktoberfest!
©dapd
How to get German citizenship if you’re British – How to be a German via Double Nationality!
AUGUSTINER AN DER FRAUENKIRCHE DRESDEN
An der Frauenkirche 16/17
01067 Dresden

The first place we went to  was a restaurant called Augustiner An der Frauenkirche.

It’s enormously famous and isn’t even Saxon but Bavarian! Having said that, the food and drink was most delicious, so I’m putting it in anyway!

You can actually order traditional Saxon food too, and the location is excellent, the service was top, everyone’s dressed in traditional Bavarian costume, and it’s mere steps away from the Frauenkirche

It’s really nice, but very, very popular so either go really early, quite late, or reserve a seat!

Bavarian Leberkäse (liver cheese meat loaf) Burger at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Obviously, the Bavarian Leberkäse (liver cheese meat loaf) Burger was delish!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman really enjoyed his Bavarian Leberkäse (a sort of liver-cheese-meatloaf) Burger, served with a pretzel roll, sweet mustard, chips / french fries, and a tiny side salad!

Cost – €11.90

Bavarian stuff – Pork Roast in Augustiner beer sauce & dumplings at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Bavarian Coleslaw at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I had the Pork Roast in Augustiner beer sauce with herby bread dumpling, and Bavarian coleslaw with bacon bits!

Cost – €11.90

We all had locally brewed beer at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Drink beer at the traditional Saxon / Bavarian Augustiner restaurant in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We all had the locally brewed Saxon / Bavarian beer at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden. It was very nice too!

Cost – €4.20

OMG!

We had more stuff, but it was quite late (?!!), and the photograph was blurry, so I haven’t included them!

Believe me when I say that sometimes, you just have to put aside your values about being a vegetarian or vegan, and just go ahead, and eat meat!

Brunch at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
CAFÉ MILCHMÄDCHEN
Grunaer Str.27
01069 Dresden

We went to the Café Milchmädchen for brunch on Saturday morning. And what a brunch it was!

The Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück consisting of 2 buns, butter, salmon, shrimp-cocktail, is a really nice hangout in the AltStadt / Old Town and right opposite the German Hygiene Museum, otherwise known as the Deutsches Hygiene-Museum!

I mentioned this a few weeks ago, as one of the museums that you ought to visit, and I still stand by it!

Scrambled eggs at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We really had a most enjoyable brunch and went all out to order scrambled eggs as well as a breakfast platter!

Cost – €2.40 – €2.90

Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman and I had the Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück consisting of 2 buns, butter, salmon, shrimp-cocktail, mustard and dill sauce, and a garnish of “light” vegetables, fresh herbs and exotic fruit.

Cost – €10.90

Gourmet Käsefrühstück at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Meanwhile, The Music Producer had the three-tier Gourmet Käsefrühstück affair – consisting of 2 buns , butter, clotted cream,  and assortment of cheese, cocktail tomato, mozzarella balls, raspberries, lingonberries, kiwis, orange slices, and a garnish of vegetables, fresh herbs and exotic fruit!

Cost – €9.70

And while we’re at it, let’s have some organic beer from Hamburg. In Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

And while we’re at it, let’s have some organic beer from Hamburg, sourced at the Café Milchmädchen in Dresden!

Cost – €2.90

Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
RADEBERGER SPEZIALAUSSHANK
Terrassenufer 1
01067 Dresden

By the time we found the Radeberger Spezialausshank, we were parched!

Dresden has been boiling in the last few weeks, and that weekend was no exception. Funny how in April, we’re all burning to a crisp and by “summer,” we’ll probably all be freezing!

This historic building is famous for Dresden’s very own beer produced in 1872 – the Radeberger Pils (pale lager) and the Radeberger Zwickelbier (unfiltered beer straight from the barrel)!

In 1905, Radeberger was the favourite drink of King Friedrich August III of Saxony, as well as the first Chancellor of Germany – Otto von Bismarck in 1887 – who both gave the beer a special license and acceptance. Is it any wonder that Radeberger is still exported today and is Germany’s 9th most popular beer!

To get there, you just need to go to the Brühlsche Terrace and go down the steps of a garden & beach parasol unit. It looks a little dodgy from the distance, but once you go down the stairs, it’s a pleasant surprise to see a lovely terrace with a fantastic view of the city and directly facing the River Elbe!

You can go up the stairs from street level too!

We were thirsty, so only had beers!

Radeberger Pils at Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Excellent views & my Radeberger Pils at Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Cost – I can’t remember exactly, but it couldn’t have been more than €3.00!

Prost!

Having a nice time at Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
BIERGARTEN ELBSEGLER – THE PLACE TO BE
Große Meißner Str.15
01097 Dresden

What a lovely place this biergarten is!

The Biergarten Elbsegler actually belongs to the Westin Bellevue Dresden Hotel, and is unique in that on one side, you have the River Elbe right in front of you, and on the other side of the biergarten, you have the views of the AltStadt / Old Town.

In fact, quite a few people were playing frisbee nearby, as well as listening to music, picnicking, frolicking, or just lounging in the early evening sunshine.

It was very nice.

The Thüringer Rostbratwurst sausage at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We were a bit peckish by this time, but not hungry enough to have a “proper” meal, so opted for a famous East German snack – the Thüringer Rostbratwurst or Thüringer grilled sausage, complete with mayonnaise, mustard, and tomato ketchup!

Cost – €3.90 – €5.90

The Tall Young Gentleman & his currywurst at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Yep! A man & his currywurst can’t be parted at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Of course, being the Berliners that we are, nothing stopped us from having their version of a currywurst. It will never be the same as the original one, but it would do!

Cost – €3.50

And then we had the Radeberger Pils (lager beer) at the Biergarten Elbsegler Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Oh, and some more Dresden Radeberger beer too.

Why not!

Cost – €3.90

Frederick Augustus II of Saxony or Augustus II the Strong – the Golden Rider!
WATZKE AM GOLDENEN REITER
Hauptstraße 1
01097 Dresden

We had dinner at the rather rustic Watzke am Goldenen Reiter or the Watzke on the Golden Rider!

It’s a branch of another famous historical restaurant and brewery – the Ball & Brauhaus Watze – which is an 1838 establishment with 3 restaurants!

We weren’t all that impressed with the food, but the location is, excuse my pun, gold, as right outside the restaurant is a very golden statue of Frederick Augustus II of Saxony or Augustus II the Strong – the Golden Rider, dressed as a Roman Caesar, riding a horse, covered in gold leaf!

The restaurant also has a huge St. John’s (as in John the Baptist!) bell which is rung on the hour, in synergy with the bells across the road, in the tower of the Frauenkirche!

Pork served with sauerkraut & plums at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Knuckle of pork, sauerkraut & dumplings at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Music Producer had crispy knuckle of pork served with sauerkraut, plums, red onions, cabbage, potato dumplings, and gravy.

Cost – €12.90

Roast chicken, potato wedges, cream & mango-chili-dip at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Chicken, potato wedges & mango-chili-dip at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman had half of a roast chicken served with potato wedges, with herby sour cream & mango-chili-dip!

Cost – €8.50

A mixed platter of chicken with vegetables & a fried egg on top!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I had the mixed platter of chicken (I think!) with potato wedges, vegetables, gravy, & a fried egg on top, but sadly, I didn’t like it as it was lukewarm, and tasted like nothing at all!

Cost – €12.00 – €15.00

Watzke Pils & Watzke unfiltered beer at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

At least the beer was alright, so we washed it all down with Watzke Pils (lager) and Watzke Altpieschner unfiltered beer, brewed on the premises!

Cost – €3.80

Drinks at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
AUSONIA2
Am Neumarkt 1
01097 Dresden

AusoniA2 is an Italian pizzeria that also serves interesting seafood. It’s on the other side of the Frauenkirche.

So let me tell you, this was a Sunday afternoon, and we found it hard to find the “best seat” with views of the Frauenkirche, the film festival that was going on at the time, and just basically, a place to do great people-watching! It took a while to find a “non-sharing” table for three (3), ‘cos this is Germany, so nobody shares tables!

Ladies dressed in baroque attires – Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We got it in the end, complete with great views – locals dressed in baroque attire. Mind you, as in New York and LA, they do expect a tip, if you want to take photographs!

The pizza prices are a little hefty, but the view makes it worth your while!

Pizza at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We had the Pizza Ausonia which consisted of tomato, mozzarella, goats cheese, pepperoni, spicy salami, and olives, which I asked them to remove…

Cost – I can’t remember exactly, but it was somewhere along the lines of €10.00 – €15.00

Wernesgrüner Pils beer from Saxony at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden ©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The beers were alright, and a different brand this time – Wernesgrüner beer from Saxony!

The Wernesgrüner Pils was founded in 1436 and is even older than the Radeberger Pils! It’s known as the”Pils Legend,” because it was a bitter specialty during the communist period in East Germany.

Wernesgrüner Pils was originally a family-owned company until 2002, when it was bought by the Bitburger Brewery Group.

It’s not my favourite beer as it tends towards the side of bitterness, but if you’re into “bitters,” this is the brand I’d recommend.

Cost – €3.50

The Kurfürstenschänke historical restaurant and guest house in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
KURFÜRSTENSCHÄNKE – HISTORICAL RESTAURANT AND GUESTHOUSE
An der Frauenkirche 13
01067 Dresden

The Kurfürstenschänke is a marvellous historical restaurant and guest house, so we decided to end our Dresden family weekend right there! 

The restaurant is a beautiful 1708 property with charming baroque architecture, high ceilings, and elegant seating, and just seconds away from the Frauenkirche!

It also serves  Saxon / Bohemian dishes, exquisite gourmet meals, as well as hearty rustic traditional food!

It’s a three level restaurant and surprisingly larger than you would expect, so plenty of seats. We preferred to sit on the outdoor terrace as it was such a hot, sweltering day.

Pork steak at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman had marinated bone roasted pork steak in beer mustard sauce, roasted onions, roasted bacon strips,with potato and cucumber-dilled salad!

Cost – €12.50

Ox cheek at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Music Producer had Ox cheek in gravy, herb curd dumplings, and grilled vegetables with ramson oil!

Cost – €13.90

The cold cuts & chesse platter at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Fürstenbrot / Aristocratic bread at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I was already pretty stuffed so opted not to have a “real meal” but a platter of Ratsherrenplatte which consisted of Leberkäse – a type of “liver-cheese” bread loaf, Thuringian red sausage, Pfefferbeißer – a dried, smoked, peppery German sausage made in sheep casings, slices of roast pork, Saxon cheese, pickled cucumber, tomatoes, butter, a side salad, and Fürstenbrot or Prince (aristocratic) bread!

Cost – €10.90

Champagne at the Kurfürstenschänke historical restaurant and guest house Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Needless to say, the best way to end a splendid weekend is with a sparkling glass of champagne.

What say you?

Cost – €4.20

Other Saxon dishes are:

  • The Dresdner Eierschecke – A type of layered cake made from yeast dough topped with apple, quark (curds), poppy seeds and covered with a glaze of egg, sugar, flour and cream!
  • Quarkkeulchen –  A type of cream-cheese ball made from cream cheese, eggs flour, mashed potatoes, and spiced with cinnamon or raisins!
  • Kalter Hund or Cold Dog – A type of square-shape chocolate cake made into hedgehog slices of chocolate, crushed biscuit, rice crispies, and with a topping of chocolate icing sprinkled with items such as coconuts, hundreds and thousands, and other toppings
  • Wickelkloß – A type of potato dumpling spread with butter, and sprinkled with breadcrumbs!
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen – German Gingerbread!
  • Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen – A type of traditional gingerbread made from chocolate and honey
  • Sächsischer Sauerbraten – A German pot roast marinated in vinegar, water, herbs, spices, and seasonings, served with red cabbage, dumplings, potatoes or Spätzle (Schwabian pasta), and made from  beef, venison, lamb, mutton, pork, or horse meat!
  • Radeberger Biergulasch – A type of goulash cooked in Radeberger Pils beer!
The Dresdner Stollen
  • And of course, Dresden’s most important Saxon item – The Dresdner Stollen – A type of rectangular-shaped fruit cake made from nuts, spices, dried or candied fruit, raisins, almonds, nuts, marzipan, and coated with icing sugar.

The Dresdner Stollen in particular is most beloved, as Dresden is considered to be the home of the original Stollen, as far back as 1474!

Dresden Stollen is produced in the city of Dresden and distinguished by a special seal depicting King Augustus II the Strong. This “official” Stollen is produced by only 150 recognised Dresden bakers!

It’s one of Germany’s most traditional items, is eaten during the Christmas Season, and can usually be found at most Christmas Markets, especially the Dresden one, otherwise known as the Striezelmarkt – one of Germany’s oldest documented Christmas markets ever, founded in 1434!

Yay!

A 5 MINUTE GUIDE TO SAXON FOOD IN DRESDEN. NOW ISN’T THAT JUST CUTE!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

This article is not sponsored, and all opinions and all the Saxon food that I noshed and slobbered over, are my very own!

In a few weeks, I’ll be revealing my next summer trip!

Stay tuned.

Yay!

That’s it for now.

See you next week!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

Do you like German food? Have you ever heard of Saxony? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!

Advertisements

Dresden: The beauty of East Germany!

At the Zwinger Palace in Dresden – Saxony!

So last week, I wrote about the best of Eastern Europe!

You responded to it quite well.

Unlike this post!

Ah well!

Writing about Romania is beginning to bore me!

However, the great thing about owning your own website, is that you can write whatever you want.

So I will!

Best of Eastern Europe. And that’s official!

As you know, I have a new job.

I’m the Referent Interne Trainings or the Internal Training Manager at a lovely company called H&D International GroupH&D ITAS Infrastructure Services GmbH.

I’m responsible for:

  • Corporate English Training
  • Training Management
  • Quality Management
  • Designing inter-cultural training and workshops
  • Planning inter-cultural training and workshops
  • Implementing inter-cultural training and workshops

Yay!

Here’s my new office at H&D International Group – H&D ITAS Infrastructure Service – ©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

And it’s in Dresden!

Marvellous!

But I live in Berlin!

Wow!

The work of a lifestyle, expat, travel blogger is never done. There’s just so much to dooo!

As you know, I’m a corporate person combining the world of style and travel, with business ventures.

And that has never changed.

Germany is one of the largest countries in Europe with excellent infrastructure in public transport, so I’ve been doing a lot of corporate travel from Berlin and throughout East Germany.

A lot!

Use my link and book your hotel!

As a result, international travel has been a little erratic and this blog has been a bit of a mess.

I’ve been living in hotels for the past 6 weeks, and the wi-fi has been absolutely horrendous.

Horrendous!!!

And coupled with early morning commuting at 03.15 in the morning in some places, let’s just say that Uber has been a godsend!

However, things have settled down, and I’m now on track.

So let’s get started.

Phew!

DRESDEN!

Victoria at the River Elbe in Dresden – Germany
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Dresden is the capital city of Saxony, otherwise known as the Free State of Saxony!

It’s situated in a valley on the River Elbe, and is the second-largest city in Saxony, as the largest city in the region happens to be Leipzig!

Dresden is in Germany, but is just 30 minutes from the border of the Czech Republic!

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION

Frederick Augustus II of Saxony or Augustus II the Strong – the Golden Rider!

Dresden has a long rich history as the capital and royal residence of the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor.

It even had a connection to the monarchy in Poland!

Dresden was once known as the Jewel Box of Germany, because of it’s Old Town city centre which is crammed with baroque and rococo architecture.

Sadly, when the international community think of Dresden, they make no mention of German splendour and historical treasures, but rather the horror of the Second World War!

War is a terrible thing, and Dresden paid the price.

Towards the end of World War II, Dresden was pretty much flattened and destroyed, and became unrecognisable.

After the war, restoration work helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Dresden Cathedral, the Zwinger Museum Complex and the very famous Semper Oper.

 

After the re-unification of German, Dresden once again concentrated on the beauty of it’s history with impressive buildings such as the 1,000 year old  Frauenkirche, otherwise known as the Church of Our Lady! The church was destroyed during WWII and the ruins were left as they were, as a war memorial, for over 50 years!

Thankfully, a new church was re-constructed using the charred stones from the previous one, as a distinct reminder of what happened. In fact, in the mid-90’s, I too left a donation for the church to be re-built!

Outside of the Old Town, Dresden has a trendy New Town – Neustadt – a nearby Saxon Switzerland National Park, the Ore Mountains which borders both Germany and the Czech Republic, the Moritzburg Castle, impressive countryside around the Elbe Valley, etc.

And.

It’s.

A.

Waterside City with the River Elbe running right through it.

Hurrah!

Exciting Times in Dresden – Forgive the casual look. I was previously wearing heels!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – March 2018

Before I actually went for my job interview, I hadn’t visited Dresden in more than twenty (20) years!

Like Hamburg, I had of course, breezed through on my way to Prague, but I hadn’t stopped there for a very long time.

So once the job was in the bag, we decided to book a family weekend, and visit Dresden through the eyes of a tourist!

Hamburg: An Introduction to a Port City!

Back to Dresden.

DRESDEN: THE BEAUTY OF EAST GERMANY!

Moritz Castle in Dresden – Saxony
Dresden: The beauty of East Germany!

A beautiful city. A Baroque Old Town. A garden suburb. A cultural metropolis, etc. These descriptions are just some of the names that Dresden has acquired over time.

But one thing remains constant – Dresden is truly one of Germany’s most beautiful cities!

So what to do if you’re a tourist?

This is what we did. Are you ready?

Read on!

  • The first thing you have to do is to go to the Old Town, enjoy the beauty and grandeur of the Baroque Old Town, and have a drink or two. We went in April and it was already burning hot!
  • Ramble through the baroque town houses and hidden corners. The Old Town is extremely small, and you really won’t get lost!
  • Admire the Frauenkirche, otherwise known as the Church of Our Lady
  • Go against the grain, and drink Saxon traditional beer at a traditional Bavarian establishment mere steps away from the Frauenkirche

We spent our first evening drinking and eating both Saxon and Bavarian fare at the very-German-looking-everyone’s-in-traditional-German-costume Augustiner restaurant!

It’s really nice, but very, very popular so either go really early, quite late, or reserve a seat!

Drink beer at the traditional Saxon / Bavarian Augustiner restaurant in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Before it got burnt to the ground!

The Semperoper in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We not only admired the building itself, but we even booked a guided tour, so that we could learn more about it’s magnificent architecture and richly decorated rooms. We paid €25.00 for a Family Ticket.

  • Go on a river-cruise. We weren’t able to book any, as it was too early in the season, but they should be well and running now!
  • Having said that, walking on the riverside is free of charge, and quite a lovely walk!
  • Have more beer. In fact, make sure that you sample, Dresden’s most famous beer – the Radeberger Pilsner!
  • Go one better, go to the riverside, and have your Radeberger lager at one of Dresden’s oldest breweries – Radeberger Spezialausschank built in 1848!
The Music Producer at the Fürstenzug – The Procession of Princes in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
  • If you see nothing else, go gape at the Fürstenzug, otherwise known as the Procession of Princes. What a wonderful piece of art! It’s a 101 metre long mural, known as the largest porcelain artwork in the world! It was originally painted between 1871 and 1876, celebrates the 800th anniversary of the Wettin Dynasty – Saxony’s ruling family at the time, and has approximately 23,000 Meissen porcelain tiles! The mural displays the ancestral portraits of the 35 margraves, electors, dukes and kings of the House of Wettin between 1127 and 1904, and it’s on the street. On a wall! You’ve probably passed it a few times and forgot where you saw it, but you can find it on the outer wall of the Stallhof or Stables Courtyard, of the Dresden Castle
  • Go to a riverside beer garden or Biergarten. See what I did there! And have a bratwurst and chips with a variety of sauces, while people-watching local Dresdeners playing ball, listening to music, or simply just chilling, with more local beer!
  • Have dinner at another famous historical restaurant and brewery – the Ball & Brauhaus Watze. It’s an 1838 establishment with 3 restaurants. We had dinner at the rather rustic Watzke am Goldenen Reiter or the Watzke on the Golden Rider! And indeed, right outside the restaurant is a very golden statue of Frederick Augustus II of Saxony or Augustus II the Strong – the Golden Rider, dressed as a Roman Caesar, riding a horse, covered in gold leaf! The restaurant also has a huge St. John’s (as in John the Baptist!) bell which is rung on the hour, in synergy with the bells across the road, in the tower of the Frauenkirche!
If there’s an open-air festival, join in! FilmFest Dresden International Short Film Festival.
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
  • If there’s an open-air festival, join in! While we were there, Dresden hosted the FilmFest Dresden International Short Film Festival. In the Old Town. Right next to the Frauenkirche. Totally free of charge! They even supplied deckchairs to lounge on. How cool is that?
  • Drink some more traditional Dresden beer!
  • Wander around some more, and if you’re lucky, you might actually get to see some of the locals dressed in baroque attire. Mind you, as in New York and LA, they do expect a tip, if you want to take photographs!
  • Go on a walking tour, but don’t expect it to be a free one outside of “the season.” We really wanted to get to grips with what Dresden was about, so we booked a historical tour at the Official Tourist Information Centre, of the City of Dresden. It was €12.00 per person, with no concessions for children over 13! However, it was well worth the price

 

 

  • Spend a few hours at the Dresdner Zwinger, which is a beautiful Baroque Palace built in 1710, and used as an Orangery, the Court festival grounds. It now serves at a Museum Complex and houses the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister – the Old Masters’ Picture Gallery, the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon – the Mathematics and Physics Salon, and the Dresdener Porzellansammlung – the Dresden Porcelain Collection. It’s very pleasant to stroll in and has a very nice fountain too. The grounds are free of charge
  • Have lunch on your second day at the Kurfürstenschänke! The Kurfürstenschänk is another historical restaurant built in 1708. As you can see, Dresden has plenty of the like!
  • Order champagne
  • And if you really want to blend in. Drink more beer!
Drink German organic beer in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I really could go on, and on.

Of course, nowhere is perfect, and one shouldn’t forget that as beautiful as Dresden is, it’s still in East Germany.

Unfortunately, East Germany has a history of xenophobia.

Dresden was always seen as an East German State that didn’t.

Until it did.

Sadly, since Germany opened it’s arms to refugees. (Oh, and just so you know. #RefugeesAreWelcome), there has been an alarming rise in right-wing populist activity spurned on by the right-wing party – Alternative for Germany – AfD.

As tourists, you’re all perfectly safe, and as an expat local who lives in the “right area” – read wealthy, gentrified,or bohemian parts of town, I’m alright too. But still.

As I told you last week, The British Berliner, aims to give you  a clear description of the places that I travel to, and my thoughts.

So don’t be scared.

Nowhere is perfect.

Except for Berlin obviously!

How to be a German – 10 ways to do it!

But really, Dresden was a pleasant surprise.

And the food was fantastic.

More about that next week!

Stirl Apartments in Dresden

Here’s where we stayed:

We stayed at a lovely apartment called Stirl Apartments.

It cost just €85.00 per night. Not including the Tourism Tax of €1.30 per person. Per night!

We had actually planned to stay at the Old Town itself, but I forgot that I had pre-booked Stirl Apartment as a last cheaper resort, just in case we couldn’t get the Aparthotel Am Schloss, a mere five (5) minutes from the Frauenkirche!

Even though the Aparthotel Am Schloss, was far more expensive, I would have preferred it, for the mere fact that it was exactly where we wanted to be.

In the Old Town!

I’ll be writing a more comprehensive guide on Dresden very soon!

DRESDEN: THE BEAUTY OF EAST GERMANY!

The Easter Riding Processions are a special tradition in Saxony!

This article is not sponsored, and all opinions, and the Dresden beer that I drank, are my very own!

Next week, more on Dresden!

And in a few weeks, I’ll be revealing my next summer trip!

Stay tuned.

Yay!

That’s it for now.

See you next week!

Lady in blue uniform – Dresden. I can’t remember what it’s about. Does anyone know?
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond WITHOUT INSURANCE.

No siree!

You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links, I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

Dresden: The beauty of East Germany!

Have you ever been to Dresden? Have you ever been to East Germany? Do you enjoy German beer? Let me know in your comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!

A first time beginners’ guide to the ITB Berlin: 10 tips to help you prepare. Bam!

A first time beginners’ guide to the ITB Berlin: 10 tips to help you prepare. Bam!

OMG!

I’m enormously excited!

And why?

The ITB travel trade fair is going to be in town.

Yeeeeeeeees!

In Kurdistan at the ITB 2015.

Gosh!

Just last week, I told you about the glamour of the Berlin International Film Festival, otherwise known as the Berlinale?

Now this!

Before I became the awesome travel blogger that I am today, I used to attend the ITB as an ordinary member of the public.

It was one of the highlights of my year!

And let me tell you, it still is!

I mean, thousands of international travel organisations and travel destinations are going to be in the city, looking to present the best parts of their country, or industry.

And yours truly will be among them.

Book your hotel here!

Accor Hotels – #myjourneybegins. It most certainly does!

Last year, was one of the most successful ITB travel trade conferences that I have ever attended!

In fact, I had so many appointments which had me going from floor to floor, that even though I used the press shuttle bus, my feet swelled up ‘cos I was wearing ankle boots, and I tend to walk like a man!

My Blogger Speed Dating appointment sheet was filled to the brim with Destinations & Marketing people wanting to meet me face-to-face, and I was invited to so many After-Hours parties, it became quite over-whelming…

Not only that, but a book author reached out to me and asked for one of my old Scotland photographs to be added to their book for a film tour, so perhaps the next time you go to the Scottish Highlands, you could be looking at one of my photographs!

Don’t risk collapse at the ITB Berlin. Fill your belly!

But most endearing of all, as I was browsing through the Poland section, looking for destination information, one of the girls started staring.

I gave her my business card to give to her boss, and she just started screaming!

Jesus in Warsaw.

She recognised my name and was thrilled and excited to finally meet and see the writer of THAT post! She told her neighbours and they all began rushing to take photographs & giggling!

I mean, that post now has over one hundred and twenty-three thousand (123,000) views!

Apparently. In Poland, I’m a bit of a notorious star!

And the title of said piece: Going to Poland: 10 reasons not to go!

Book your hotel here!

The secret of eating & drinking in Warsaw – How to make pierorgi and eat it!

This year, I’m once again, all ready and organised.

Now that I’m a professional blogger don’t you know, I get to have internal access to all that the travel industry has to offer.

If you’re reading about the ITB for the first time, here’s what I previously wrote:

But it doesn’t hurt to reiterate the facts:

WHAT IS THE ITB?

ITB Berlin Convention 2018
ITB Berlin Convention 2018

The ITB Berlin stands for the Internationale Tourismus-Börse or in English, the international tourism trade fair.

The ITB represents B2B, hotels, tourists boards, tour operators and providers, airlines, transport operators, responsible travel organisers, information technology experts, social media bloggers, and anybody else interested in travel and tourism.

It’s also the world’s leading travel industry think tank, in which the convention trade fair establishes itself as the industry’s main knowledge platform, with top-notch presentations on global trends, travel innovations and path-breaking events for the entire tourism industry!

Phew!

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT THEN?

Happy bloggers at ITB Berlin – ©Natalie Deduck – Loveandroad.com

Well, the ITB Berlin is the foremost business platform for the global tourism business. We’re talking:

  • 5 continents
  • 180 Countries
  • 200 trendsetting events
  • 400 speakers
  • 1,000 Qualified Top Buyers
  • 10,000 Exhibitors
  • 28,000 Convention Visitors and Participants attending lectures, discussions, and workshops
  • 60,000 Private Visitors
  • 109,000 Trade Visitors
  • 160,000 Square meters
  • Bloggers from 25 countries all over the world
  • Over 5 days within 7th March – 11th March, 2018
  • Bringing in a €7 billion turnover to Germany!

Book your hotel here!

A zebra in Zambia

Omigosh!

If you’re at the ITB, you’re in good company.

The ITB Berlin is a huge deal. The convention & culture partner country for 2018 is Zambia with the motto: – Let’s explore.
Official Partner Region ITB 2018 Mecklenburg-Vorpommern – © 2018 Messe Berlin

And the official Partner Region for ITB 2018 is Mecklenburg-Vorpommern – Best of Northern Germany.

Exciting!

ITB BERLIN IS 52 YEARS OLD!

The beautiful French Quarter - Gendarmenmarkt - in Berlin
The beautiful French Quarter – Gendarmenmarkt – in Berlin

The name ITB Berlin stands for a unique success story and things that are made in Berlin.

What began in 1966, as a small overseas import trade show, has developed into a true global success.

What originally, was only an event of five (5) participating countries and regions, has grown to over 180 with an exhibition space expanding from 580 m² to 160,000 m² today!

In more than five (5) decades, so many societal and political changes have taken place. As far as the tourism industry is concerned, Germany has developed into one of the world’s most important economic factors!

Book your hotel here!

So is it worth going to ITB Berlin? Yes! It most certainly is!

Today, the ITB Berlin is the leading trade show of the travel industry and, at the same time, the biggest travel show for the German public!

However, it’s a huge venue and there have been incidents of people wandering around and not actually getting to where they wanted to go!

Not naming names or anything, so here’s a few tips on how to navigate your way around!

WHEN CAN YOU VISIT?

Visitors are welcome at the ITB Berlin!
Visitors are welcome at the ITB Berlin!

OPENING HOURS.

Trade visitors: 7th – 11th March, 2018. 09:30 – 18:00
The general public: 10th – 11th March, 2018. 10:00 – 18:00
Journalists and bloggers: 6th – 11th March, 2018. 08:00 – 18:00

ADMISSION.

ITB BERLIN – The world in one place!
ITB BERLIN – The world in one place!

You can buy tickets at the Exhibition Grounds – or save time and money and buy them in advance at the Online Ticket Shop. Entrance for Trade Visitors / Press to the ITB Berlin Convention is included in the price of your trade fair ticket.

Trade Fair Visitors:

  • One Day Ticket: Online in advance – €42.00. On the day – €62.00
  • A Five Day Permanent Trade Visitor Pass Ticket: Online in advance – €60.00. On the day – €90.00
  • Accredited press / bloggers: Free of charge, in advance. If not accredited, as above
I would just like to thank some very important people – YOU!

The General Public.

  • One Day ticket: Online in advance – €12.00. On the day – €15.00
  • Reduced priced tickets – students / retired /unemployed etc. On the day – €8.00
  • Last Minute tickets (only valid on March 12th, from 14:00) – On the day – €8.00
  • All children under the age of fourteen (14) if accompanied by an adult, are totally free of charge!

p.s. You should also be able to buy a €12.00 ticket from any BVG/SBahn ticket machine. And if you live in Berlin, watch out for the free voucher that sometimes comes, via free delivery of the weekend edition of the Berliner Morgenpost newspaper!

Book your hotel here!

HOW DO I GET TO THE ITB?

Use the ITB shuttle service to get around. It's free!
Use the ITB shuttle service to get around. It’s free!

If you’re a trade visitor or a member of the press, then there is a free ITB shuttle service that will take you from the airport, from selected hotels and from various stops around the city to the ITB Exhibition Ground. If you’re using the city shuttle line service, please note that the stops are not marked as ITB Berlin stops, but are selected buses at the regular bus stops of the Berlin Public Transport System, otherwise known as the BVG!

Using Berlin's public transport is perfectly safe & very cheap!
Using Berlin’s public transport is perfectly safe & very cheap!

You can find bus stops at:

Line A

  • Bus-Stop 1: Unter den Linden / Friedrichstraße
  • Bus-Stop 2: Train Station Potsdamer Platz (on Leipziger Platz)

Line B

  • Bus-Stop 1: Underground Station U Wittenbergplatz
  • Bus-Stop 2: Underground Station U Kurfürstendamm (Kranzlereck)
  • Bus-Stop 3: Olivaer Platz (Kurfürstendamm 61)
  • Bus-Stop 4: Underground Station U Adenauerplatz
  • Bus-Stop 5: Sbahn Train Station S Halensee

HOW TO NAVIGATE YOUR WAY AROUND THE ITB VENUE.

Navigate your way around the ITB Berlin - ©2017 Messe Berlin
Navigate your way around the ITB Berlin – ©2017 Messe Berlin

There are seven (7) entrances, but to give you a better insight you can download a map of the exhibition ground:

  • Entrance South (Jafféstrasse): Halls 1 – 6 Marshall Haus
  • CityCube Berlin: Halls 7a – 7c
  • Entrance Hall 9 (Messedamm): Halls 8 – 10
  • Entrance East (Hall 14.1, opposite the ICC Berlin): Halls 12 – 17
  • Entrance North (Hall 19, Hammarskjöldplatz) am Funkturm: Halls 18 – 24 – Palais
  • Entrance Hall 26: Halls 25 – 26

The ITB venue is pretty huge so within the exhibition ground itself, you can use the free ITB fairground shuttles that will transport you from Hall to Hall!

Take the Ring Train S41 or S42 to the ITB Berlin!
Take the Ring Train S41 or S42 to the ITB Berlin!

If you’re not using any of the above, or you’re a member of the general public, then you need to get yourself to the following public transport stations. Don’t forget to get a ticket!

There’s no need to panic though, as the city of Berlin provides an extensive public transport network, but make sure you read this post as to how to buy a daily ticket, as Berlin doesn’t have any barriers, and you don’t want to get caught out without a ticket now, do you?

The stations that you need to get to are:

  • Messe Süd – Sbahn Train S5
  • Messe Nord /ICC  – Ring Train S41 or S42
  • Kaiserdamm – Underground Station U2
  • Westkreuz  – Sbahn Train S75, S7, S5, Ring Train S41 or S42. You ought to change to Messe Süd (one stop), or go for a little stroll instead, but it’s a bit of a walk!

Book your hotel here

A FIRST TIME BEGINNERS’ GUIDE TO THE ITB BERLIN: 10 TIPS TO HELP YOU PREPARE. BAM!

A first time beginners guide to the ITB Berlin: 10 tips to help you prepare. Bam!
  1.  BOOK: Are you flying, taking the train, hustling in the coach-bus or car-sharing? If so, book your Berlin hotel here!
  2.  FOCUS: Define what you want to accomplish and whom you want to contact
  3.  PLAN: Set up meetings and appointments
  4.  DO RESEARCH: Get information about the industry’s latest trends and use the Virtual Market Place® catalogue to find out who’s there!
  5.  LEARN: Go to presentations, workshops, conferences and talks. I learnt all about Twitter for the first time at ITB and then the next day, I went live and never looked back!
  6.  SAVE: Buy your Visitor Ticket in advance at the Online Ticket Shop
  7.  NAVIGATE: Use the Map of the Exhibition Grounds for your personal orientation
  8.  DOWNLOAD: The  ITB App with maps, lists, and services for free. Available for iOS and Android systems too
  9.  NETWORK: The ITB Berlin offers networking events of a special kind – ITB Blogger Speed Dating and the ITB Speed Networking event. However, it doesn’t matter if you’ve not made an appointment previously, although it helps if you do. Nevertheless, you’re at the largest travel trade fair in the world, so go and explore!
  10.  ENJOY: You’re in one of the finest cities in the world. Have fun!

DON’T FORGET!

Hair & Make Up – Check! Exude confidence – Check!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner
  • Business Cards – Check!
  • Business Card Folder or File, so that you don’t lose the ones that you’ve collected – Check!
  • Map – Check!
  • ITB Berlin App Guide – Check!
  • Mobile or Cell Phone, plus charger – Check!
  • Bottle of Water – Check!
  • Smart clothing – Check!
  • Exude confidence – Check!
  • Smile – Check!

See you at the ITB!

Book your hotel here!

A FIRST TIME BEGINNERS’ GUIDE TO THE ITB BERLIN: 10 TIPS TO HELP YOU PREPARE. BAM!

Keep Calm and go to ITB Berlin! ©2017 Messe Berlin

This article isn’t sponsored, and the remarkable time that I’m sure to have at the ITB Berlin, is my very own!

I’ll be continuing my last visit to the UK and telling you all about my visit to Belgium later in the season!I’ll be at the ITB Berlin or the Internationale Tourismus-Börse Berlin – the world’s leading travel trade show, taking place between 7th – 11th March, 2018. You can buy tickets here.

Everyone who is anyone in the travel industry, will be here. Come and join us!

In April, I’ll be on the road again to my 65th country and a new destination.

Can you guess which one it’ll be?

I’ll be there. Will you?If you’re not in Berlin in March, I can’t even!See you next week!

A first time beginners’ guide to the ITB Berlin: 10 tips to help you prepare. Bam!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyondWITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links, I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

A first time beginners’ guide to the ITB Berlin: 10 tips to help you prepare. Bam!

Have you ever been to the ITB Berlin? Would you consider going to a travel trade fair? Were the tips useful? Let me know below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!