Croatia – a basic guide to food!

How to visit the Balkans: Introducing Croatia – the dream of Game of Thrones!

And so it’s here!

The last post that I’ll be writing about Croatia.

For now!

But what a most important post!

It goes without saying that my stay in Croatia was a delight. It was my first time to go to the Balkans, but it certainly, won’t be the last. If you’re just tuning in, here’s what you missed:

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!
Game of Thrones – Season 7 – Kristofer Hivju as Tormund Giantsbane & Gwendoline Christie as Brienne of Tarth
©Helen Sloan – HBO

Honestly speaking, most people have never previously heard of Croatia.

Before Game of Thrones!

I’m a great fan of the show and can’t wait to see Series Seven (7).

And Eight (8)!

I know. I’m a freakish nerd!

A traditional Busker in Zagreb – Croatia!

Isn’t Croatia somewhere in Eastern Europe?

Yes.

And No!

It can’t be both surely?

The Music Producer in Split. Geographically, Croatia is one of the previous communist states!

Well, geographically, it’s one of the previous communist states.

Don’t worry.

Breath!

However, in recent years, Croatia has managed to re-invent itself, so that even though it is actually in Eastern Europe, it’s marketed as Central Europe too!

Croatia isn’t crowded in the Spring – Locals in Zagreb – Croatia!

In truth, it has the vibe of the Mediterranean, and you’d be hard pressed not to think that in certain parts of Croatia, you could actually be in Italy, or dare I say it. Austria!

And this is reflected in it’s food!

Book your hotel here!

So let’s get started:

WHAT IS CROATIAN FOOD?

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Croatian food is defined by it’s regions, towns and villages, and has its own distinct culinary tradition rooting back to ancient times!

The best way to experience how a nation really lives, is to go to the market place and sample street food.

I adore street food as it’s ultimately the best way to get to the culture of a nation. I’ve been to many countries, and sampled many a nations’ cuisine, and Croatia was no exception!

The differences in the selection of foodstuffs and forms of cooking are most notable between those on the Croatian mainland, and those in coastal regions.

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Mainland cuisine is characterized by earlier Slavic and neighboring cultures such as Hungarian and Turkish, with the use of pork fat such as lard, and spices such as black pepper, paprika, and garlic, while the coastal regions are influenced by ancient Greek, Roman, and modern-day Mediterranean cuisine, with the use of olive oil, and herbs and spices such as rosemary, sage, bay leaf, and citrus rind.

Rustic traditional food is derived from the former Yugoslavian nations and use the same basic ingredients such as grains, dairy, meat, fish, and vegetables, with similar cooking styles such as stewing, grilling, roasting and baking.

We spent a lot of the time in coastal regions.

Take me to Dubrovnik right away!

Most ingredients used in Croatian food would be:

  • olive oil
  • courgettes
  • cabbage
  • aubergine
  • tomatoes
  • mushrooms
If you’re looking for traditional ingredients, you can get everything you need at a local street market!

Croatia has an abundance of fresh, local, seasonal foodstuff such as olives and honey, joined in recent years by a plethora of health and ecology-conscious food stores selling organic vegetables, pure fruit juices, gluten-free bread and all manner of boutique deli grocery items!

In fact, there’s absolutely no need to visit a supermarket at all!

Take a look below:

CROATIA – A BASIC GUIDE TO FOOD!

Lamb on baby green pea puree - Croatian food is most delicious!
Lamb on baby green pea puree – Croatian food is most delicious!

I could write pages and pages of what Croatian food consists of and how they make it, but instead, I’ll let the pictures do the talking and if you have further insight, let me know in the comment section below!

BRUNCH:

Booking an apartment in Croatia is by far better, than booking a hotel!

We stayed in various apartments which I found courtesy of booking.com. All were pretty huge, centrally located, and cost between €45.00 – €60.00 per nights. As a result, we didn’t really go out for breakfast, but rather for brunch!

You can opt for:

This plate of Cevapcici was certainly pretty cheap. Ho! Ho!
  • Cevapcici – a type of grilled lamb sausage dish traditionally found in many Balkan countries and actually, the national dish of Bosnia,  Herzegovina, and Serbia! It’s usually served on a plate or in flatbread, with raw chopped onions, sour cream, kajmak, ajvar, feta cheese, ground red pepper and salt. The service was slow but the food was quite delicious. Bought at Kitchen & Gruill PLAC – Cost: 39kn or €5.25
  • Soparnika (chard filled pastry)
  • Zrnovo macaroni
  • OMG! Truffles in Štrukli!
A popular traditional Croatian dish composed of dough and stuffed with cheese – Štrukli Truffles in Zagreb – Croatia!

Štrukli is a popular traditional Croatian dish composed of dough and filled with cheese, various types of filling and then cooked or baked. We found ours at a popular place where you can have a wide variety of štrukli, ranging from traditional cheese to blueberry. We had ours with truffles and sat in the very pretty summer garden. Great service. Fantastic food! Bought at La Štruk restaurant in Zagreb. Cost: 35kn or €4.70

  • Quiche
  • Scrambled eggs with prsut, mushrooms and cheese
  • Smoked-salmon platter
An Egg Benedict brunch, at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia!
  • We had brunch at this rather wonderful unique restaurant within one of the Squares of the city walls of Split! In fact, we liked the restaurant so much that we went back twice! The Music Producer & The Tall Young Gentleman both had a meal of Egg Benedict which consisted of poached eggs laid on top of crunchy whole wheat toasted bread, creamy avocado, rocket, tomato and olive oil. Bought at the cute restaurant Bepa! in Split. Cost: 30kn or €4.00
A Croatian-style “English breakfast,” at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia!
  • I had the Croatian-style “English breakfast” of scrambled eggs, crispy bacon, Croatian sausage, grilled tomato, and spicy baked beans! Again, bought at Bepa! above, in Split. Cost: 59kn or €8.00
A “Club Sandwich” beef burger, a fried egg, bacon, lettuce, & tomatoes, served with a portion of chips in a red polka dot mug and a tureen of ketchup!
  • We went back again for lunch and both The Music Producer and The Tall Young Gentleman had burgers. Here’s the “Club Sandwich” which actually consisted of a beef burger, a fried egg, bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes, served with a portion of chips in a red polka dot mug and a fancy tureen of ketchup! Once again bought at Bepa! above, in Split. Cost: 65kn or €8.80
  • Porridge with an array of snazzy toppings
Ham and egg foam pâté with horseradish cream, for Easter brunch, in Dubrovnik – Croatia!

We were invited to a complimentary press Easter brunch, along with journalists from Italy! Our brunch was at a restaurant which was opposite the Gate of the Old City of Dubrovnik.

  • The restaurant serves only Croatian food as a matter of policy, and includes both seafood and meat dishes. We had a three (3) course brunch meal and a separate dessert was made for me ‘cos of my allergies! Our ham and egg foam pâté with horseradish cream was most delicious, and something I had never had before! Eaten at GUSTA ME restaurant in Dubrovnik – press lunch – As part of an Easter brunch three-course menu – retail price – 160kn or €21.00
  • Cololino (Croatian pap)

SNACKS:

Pork sandwiches bought at the street market in Zagreb – Croatia
  • Pork sandwiches made from Istrian and Dalmatian Pršut – dry-cured ham, tucked into thick slabs of fresh crusty bread from Vis! Bought at the Zagreb Street Market on the Ban Jelačić (main) square. Cost: 21.20kn or €2.85
Mmm! Fritule – Croatian doughnuts – are quite yum!
  • Fritule – Croatian doughnuts – can be found everywhere in Croatia. Bought at the Zagreb Street Market on the Ban Jelačić (main) square. Cost: 15 kn or €2.00
A Croatian sandwich made from thick slices of mozzarella and thinly cut Miljevci prosciutto, in Zagreb – Croatia!

A Croatian sandwich made from a bread roll with thick slices of mozzarella and thinly cut Miljevci prosciutto. Bought at the cafe next door to our lovely apartment in Zagreb. Cost: 12kn or €1.70!

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DINNER:

I can't remember where ate this meal, but it was lovely! Croatia - a basic guide to food!
I can’t remember where ate this meal, but it was lovely! Croatia – a basic guide to food!

For dinner, we always strive to patronise interesting traditional-inspired restaurants. For this, we don’t scrimp, but use the opportunity to sample all that is good in Croatian cuisine.

We wanted to eat in Gornji Grad – the Old Town – The restaurant that we had our eye on was situated between the church of St. Mark, the Natural History Museum, the Museum of the City of Zagreb, and not far off from the Museum of Broken Relationships!

However, without a reservation, or a large number of heads, it proved extremely difficult to get a nice seat, or any seat at all! Of course, if you’re happy to be tucked in the outside patio, far from the action, or where you couldn’t see a thing then…

Er. Nope! I didn’t come all this way to be hidden away.

We decided to come again the next day, and this time we succeeded!

Dalmatian uštipak – fried doughnut balls – served with kajmak – Croatian clotted cream cheese ‘cos of the less-than-stellar service!

It’s a tavern-like place that is influenced by a mixture of Bosnian-Herzegovinian and Mediterranean cuisine. Sadly, the service wasn’t the best and neither was the food. Both The Music Producer and The Tall Young Gentleman enjoyed their dinner, but I didn’t!

  • The above dish of Dalmatian uštipak – fried doughnut balls – served with kajmak – Croatian clotted cream cheese was served On the House, ‘cos of the less-than-stellar service! Bought at Konoba Didov San – Gornji Grad, in Zagreb. Cost: 0.00kn or €0.00
Grilled eel with a nice side dish of roast potatoes, in Zagreb – Croatia!
  • The meal above was a dish of grilled eel with a nice side dish of roast potatoes. Bought at Konoba Didov San – Gornji Grad, in Zagreb. Cost: 130kn or €18.00
  • Wild asparagus
  • Dried pork loin and sausage with pickled cabbage
I'm not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a "cup" of roast potatoes!
I’m not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a “cup” of roast potatoes!

I’ve become quite European in nature so that I’m quite picky. In Zagreb, this could lead to not finding a place to eat!

  • Luckily, we found a nice little outfit which was small, and had a trendy bar and bistro menu. I’m not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a “cup” of roast potatoes! Bought at Otto & Frank, in Zagreb. Cost: 42kn or €5.60
  • Wild boar
  • Chicken in a wood-fired oven
  • Vitalac – skewered lamb offal
Eating frogs – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
  • Eels and frogs
  • Lamb tripe
  • Artichokes with fava beans

SEAFOOD:

A full seafood lunch of Frigadura, at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia! We liked it so much, we went twice!
  • I had a “trayful” of seafood samples or Frigadura at this rather wonderful unique restaurant within one of the Squares of the city walls of Split! In fact, we liked the restaurant so much that we went back twice! My meal consisted of prawns, shrimps, mussels and sardines, served with a portion of french fries and a fancy tureen of whitefish sauce! Bought at the cute restaurant Bepa! in Split. Cost: 95kn or €12.80
  • Crab
  • Oysters

I adore seafood so we went to a little sailing harbour in Split and found a lovely place. It was packed with Croatian locals, Italians, and lots of families with their teenage children! I was already impressed as teenagers can be so picky, but discerning!

Pasta and seafood in Split. Oh my!
  • We all had pasta seafood dishes. My Tagliatelle came with mussels, shrimps, prawns and bits of lobster in a tomato sauce. Delish! Bought at the sailing restaurant Konoba – Barkarola in Split. Cost: 75kn or €11.00
Pickled seafood – Croatia – a basic guide to food
King Prawns – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
St. Jacobs scallops with spinach risotto – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
  • Scampi
  • Butarga – salted, cured fish roe
  • Spiny lobster

DESSERT:

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

On our second night in Croatia, we went to a restaurant that is located in one of the oldest streets in the city’s old centre. In a basement that is over 300 years old! Unfortunately, the lighting was too “soft” to take good photos so I only have a picture of dessert!

Istrian custard or flawn, presented with berries & cream in Zagreb – Croatia!
Chocolate cake in Dubrovnik – Croatia. Eww!
  • I hate chocolate cake, but if you like it, help yourself in Dubrovnik. Eww!! Eaten at GUSTA ME restaurant in Dubrovnik – press lunch – As part of an Easter brunch three-course menu – retail price – 160kn or €21.00
Ice cream in Zagreb – Croatia!

Who doesn’t love ice-cream? I’m always having to be careful ‘cos of the liberal sprinkling of nuts that I seem to see everywhere these days, and the combination of chocolate! The former ‘cos I have a nut allergy, and the latter ‘cos I don’t like chocolate! I read about a trendy ice-cream parlour in the Time Out Zagreb magazine, so off we went.

  • The ice-cream parlour didn’t let us down. Bought at Millennium in Zagreb. Cost: 9kn per ice-cream scoop or €1.25!!!
  • Sweet pastries

DRINKS & REFRESHMENTS:

This glass of beer was quaffed on our Dubrovnik apartment terrace, and was a gift from our Croatian landlord!

The food culture in Croatia, as in many other Mediterranean States is that of outdoor, al fresco dining. The weather generally tends to be warm and summery, and the lifestyle in the country tends to be more relaxed.

You can, and should, take little breaks, have a snack, or a drink. The cost is relatively peanuts, and the quality is great. In fact, I found  that in many places, the cost of a taxi-ride was even cheaper than three (3) glasses of wine and a cup of coffee!

Al fresco dining in Croatia is great. So why shouldn’t you indulge?

So why shouldn’t you indulge?

Croatia has a variety of freshly – squeezed juice. Be careful when you order “lemonade” as The Tall Young Gentleman was surprised to receive freshly squeezed lemon, when actually what he wanted was Schweppes!

A refreshing jar of ginger-ale in Split – Croatia!
  • Here’s a refreshing jar of ginger-ale. Cost: 25kn or €3.40

Have a beverage at the many bars, restaurants and cafés that can be found on the very long street packed shoulder-to-shoulder!

NOTE! In the daytime, stroll around and take your pick, but by nightfall know that if you’re in Zagreb and you’re as picky as I am, you’ll probably not get to eat!

The establishments have different names but tend to belong to the same group. There might also be a very long wait for service. Make sure you keep the waiter in view so that he can keep the drinks coming. It’s expected that with each order, you pay on the spot, then order again.

A cold glass of coca-cola in Zagreb – Croatia!

You can also have:

  • Lovran chestnuts. Yuck!
  • Pag cheese
You can go to the lake in Split-Croatia, and have yourself a Karlovacko beer!
  • Home-grown Karlovačko beer
  • Staro Češko – from the Czech minority living in Croatia
  • Riječko pivo
  • Tomislav
How to visit the Balkans: Introducing Croatia – the dream of Game of Thrones!
  • Ožujsko
  • Velebitsko pivo
  • Pivo Toceno
  • Osječko: from the Osijek – the oldest brewery in Croatia!
Wine at lunch in Zagreb – Croatia!

Croatian wine has a history dating back to the Ancient Greek settlers, and many traditional grape varieties still survive. However, at first glance, many restaurants would offer me Italian or French wine instead! Insist on the local variety, which I found perfectly up to par.

  • The glass of red wine bought above at Kitchen & Gruill PLAC was cheaper than a (15kn or €2.00) glass of Schweppes!!! Cost: 9kn or €1.25!!!
  • Teran wine
  • Zlahtina from Vrbnik wine
  • Maraschino liqueur
  • Babic wine
  • Marastina wine
Semberg Rosé wine in Split-Croatia
  • The Semberg Rosé wine above was bought at restaurant Bepa! Cost: 45kn or €6.50
  • Debit wine
  • Plavac Mali wine
  • Dobricic wine
  • Vugava wine
  • Bogdanusa wine
  • Prosek wine
  • Posip wine
  • dubrovnic malvasia wine
  • Grk wine

I could go on and on, but I ought to leave something for you to discover, don’t you think?

That’s it for now.

See you next week!

Book your hotel or apartment here!

CROATIA – A BASIC GUIDE TO FOOD!

Croatian beer & Croatian coffee – Croatia – a basic guide to food!

This article is not sponsored and all opinions and the wonderful traditional food that we sampled, are my very own!

In May & June, I’ll be visiting Sweden and Slovenia!

From May 17th – May 20th, I’ll be at the Berlin Music Video Awards.

From July 4th – July 7th, I’ll be at Berlin Fashion Week. It’s going to be awesome!

I’ll be there. Will you?

If you’re not in Berlin in May, you’re crazy!

Save the Date!

May & June are going to be thrilling!

Croatian cold cuts & cheese – Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Have you ever had Croatian food? Would you try lamb tripe or eels and frogs? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!
Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

OMG!

What a great reception we had about my previous post on Zaandam! Such a surprise and discovery for many!

For those of you just joining, and if so, where have you been all my life?

Here they are:

Dutch children in traditional costume.
Dutch children in traditional costume.

As promised, I’m going to write about Dutch food.

Now last week, was a bit of a long post..and after a week of skiing in the Czech Republic, I’m rather worn out, so I’ll just give you the barest of literature, and let the pictures speak for themselves!

WHAT IS DUTCH FOOD?

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!
Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

Dutch food, otherwise known as Nederlandse keuken, consists of the food traditions and practices, from the Netherlands!

Now it’s really confusing trying to explain what the difference between Holland and the Netherlands is, so I’ll let this hilarious video explain it for you!

Sadly, Holland, like Germany, is not really known for it’s excellent variety of food.

Traditionally, Dutch food is considered to be somewhat of the simple and straightforward variety with lots of vegetables, and very little meat. In short, quite rustic!

However, due to the influence of colonialism in the Dutch East Indies, and a contemporary international mix, Dutch food has become more interesting, more diverse, and far healthier, with sprinkles of stodge during the cold winter months!

Take a look below:

DUTCH FOOD AND WAFFLES: WHAT TO EAT IN HOLLAND!

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!
Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

BREAKFAST:

A Continental Breakfast of crosissant, colds cuts, cheese, cherry tomatoes, and boiled eggs at the NL-Hotel Museumplein, Amsterdam.
A Continental Breakfast of croissant, colds cuts, cheese, cherry tomatoes, and boiled eggs in Amsterdam.

A Dutch breakfast is typically Continental in style and usually consists of a wide variety of cold cuts, cheeses and sweet toppings; such as chocolate spread, treacle, otherwise known as stroop, peanut butter and apple butter!

Dutch cake for breakfast!
Dutch cake for breakfast!

There is also a wide variety of whole grain bread as well as Dutch bread, with sunflower or pumpkin seeds, rye bread, a Frisian version of white bread known as suikerbrood, or otherwise known as white bread with lumps of sugar mixed in. Eeek!

Kerststol – a traditional Dutch Christmas bread made out of dough, sugar, dried fruits, almond paste and currants, and Ontbijtkoek or peperkoek – a Dutch spiced gingerbread type of cake often served at breakfast, with a thick layer of butter on top!

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!
Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

In fact, a breakfast of everything that you could ever desire!

Cost: €4.99 – €22.00

SNACKS:

Dutch home-made chips with tomato ketchup and a dollop of mayo!
Dutch home-made chips with tomato ketchup and a dollop of mayo!

You can find a wide variety of snacks all over Holland.

Dutch fish and chips with a variety of Dutch seafood sauces. In Zaandam!
Dutch fish and chips with a variety of Dutch seafood sauces. In Zaandam!

They tend to range from french fries to mini pancakes. The deep-fried battered codfish, whiting or cod cheeks from the North Sea above is known as Kibbeling, and often served with a mayonnaise-based garlic, remoulade, or tartar sauce, as well as a variety of different seafood sauces!

We bought ours from a seafood stand in Zaandam, where all manner of herring and seafood is sold.

And very nice they were too!

Dutch chips and Mayo. Umm. They're alright. I coped!
Dutch chips and Mayo. Umm. They’re alright. I coped!

Most of the snacks are quite greasy, but nice and cheap.

Dutch mini-burgers from a vending machine!
Dutch mini-burgers from a vending machine!

Ranging from mini burgers to croquettes!

Dutch mini-croquettes from a vending machine!
Dutch mini-croquettes from a vending machine!

And when in Rome, do as the Dutch do and use a vending machine!

"The Tall Young Gentleman" was desperate to try something Dutch from the vending machine. And as you can see, it was perfectly fine!
“The Tall Young Gentleman” was desperate to try something Dutch from the vending machine. And as you can see, it was perfectly fine!

However, make sure that you use a “restaurant-bar” rather than at the train station, as you can be sure that the replacements are always fresh. There were queues of respectable people using these very same “restaurant-bars,” so no need to fear if they’re alright. They’re alright!

And make sure that you have the correct change, ‘cos you won’t get your money back if you don’t!

Cost: €1.50 – €7:00

CHEESE:

The Dutch are very famous for their cheeses ranging from semi-hard or hard cheeses such as Gouda, Edam, and Leyden!
The Dutch are very famous for their cheeses ranging from semi-hard or hard cheeses such as Gouda, Edam, and Leyden!

If you were to ask most people which food items remind them of Holland, as in Switzerland, most people would say cheese!

The Dutch have been making cheese since 800 B.C. and some say, that Holland is the largest cheese exporter in the world!

The Dutch are very famous for their cheeses ranging from semi-hard or hard cheeses such as Gouda, Edam, and Leyden!
The Dutch are very famous for their cheeses ranging from semi-hard or hard cheeses such as Gouda, Edam, and Leyden!

With an average of 21 kilograms per year per person, we can say the Dutch love their own cheese.

Dutch people eat cheese with everything!
Dutch people eat cheese with everything!

In fact, Dutch people eat cheese for breakfast, cheese on sandwiches, cheese for lunch, cheese as a snack, and cheese for supper served with mustard, and a lovely glass of Dutch beer!

The Dutch are very famous for their cheeses ranging from semi-hard or hard cheeses such as Gouda, Edam, and Leyden!
The Dutch are very famous for their cheeses ranging from semi-hard or hard cheeses such as Gouda, Edam, and Leyden!

The Dutch are very famous for their cheeses ranging from semi-hard or hard cheeses such as Gouda, Edam, and Leyden, and as such, the five (5) most traditional cheese markets in Holland can be found in Alkmaar, Edam, Hoorn, Gouda and Woerden.

In fact, you can still see how cheese merchants do business, much as they have done, for more than 600 years! And of course, “Old Amsterdam” cheese which you can get all over Amsterdam!

Cheese Connoissuers in Holland.
Cheese connoisseurs in Holland.

A typical Dutch way of making cheese is to blend in herbs or spices during the first stage of the production process, such as in cheeses with cloves (Friesian Clove), cumin (Leyden cheese), Dutch Farmhouse Cheese with Italian Black Truffle, and even cheese with nettles!

Cheese-tasting is very popular, in Holland!
Cheese-tasting is very popular. In Holland!

Cheese in Holland is exciting!

Cost: €1.50 – €..whatever!

DINNER:

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!
Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

Traditionally a Dutch dinner would have potatoes with a large portion of vegetables and a small portion of meat with gravy, or a potato and vegetable stew.

Beetroot and red cabbage are important Dutch side-dishes, and can be meals in themselves!
Beetroot and red cabbage are important Dutch side-dishes, and can be meals in themselves!

Vegetable stews are often served with side dishes such as rodekool met appeltjes, otherwise known as red cabbage with apples, or rode bieten, otherwise known as beetroot!

Yum!

Dutch food is also served with a variety of pickles!
Dutch food is also served with a variety of pickles!

They are also served with pickles, including augurken, otherwise known as gherkins, or zilveruitjes, otherwise known as cocktail onions!

A huge meatball with stamppot, otherwise known as a Dutch traditional meal of mashed potatoes and several vegetables, or fruit!
A huge meatball with stamppot, otherwise known as a Dutch traditional meal of mashed potatoes and several vegetables, or fruit!

One of the most popular traditional Dutch foods would be stamppot, otherwise known as mashed potatoes with a variety of mashed vegetables!

A Dutch appetizer of marinated seafood and asparagus!
A Dutch appetizer of marinated seafood and asparagus!

But, you know, you don’t have to contend with traditional food, and stodge, you can have “nice food” too. The like of which we had at our quirky Inntel Hotels Amsterdam Zaandam,  in the very nice and interesting windmill-filled town of Zaandam!

A Dutch dinner of guinea fowl, baked fluffy potoatoes, fried mushrooms, and asparagus!
A Dutch dinner of guinea fowl, baked fluffy potatoes, fried mushrooms, and asparagus!

Just look at this succulent guinea fowl!

A Dutch dinner of venison steak stuffed with lightly seared vegetables sprinkled with chocolate oil!
A Dutch dinner of venison steak stuffed with lightly seared vegetables sprinkled with chocolate oil!

Or how about this rather wonderful meal of venison steak?

Delightful!

Cost: €12.00 – €20.00

DESSERT:

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!
Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

The most popular Dutch dessert is that of the stroopwafel, otherwise known as a waffle!

The most popular Dutch dessert is that of the stroopwafel, otherwise known as a waffle!
The most popular Dutch dessert is that of the stroopwafel, otherwise known as a waffle!

It’s not any old waffle of course, as the stroopwafel originated from the town of Gouda, and was first made during the late 18th or early 19th century!

It was said that a baker invented the Dutch waffle by using leftovers from the bakery, such as breadcrumbs, and sweetening it with syrup.

The most popular Dutch dessert is that of the stroopwafel, otherwise known as a waffle!
The most popular Dutch dessert is that of the stroopwafel, otherwise known as a waffle!

Dutch waffles – the stroopwafel – is made from baked batter and sliced horizontally. Two thin layers of the waffle are filled with special sweet and sticky syrup, otherwise known as the stroop, and put in between.

Occasionally, crushed hazelnuts are mixed with the stroop, and the dough is also spiced with cinnamon.

We also had a Dutch speciality known as vla or vlaai!
We also had a Dutch speciality known as vla or vlaai!

We also had a Dutch speciality known as vla or vlaai!

The word vla was first documented in the 13th century and originally referred to any custard-like substance covering a cake, or any other baked good. The word vlaai is related and has since come to refer to a type of pie filled with either fruit, custard, rhubarb or rice pudding!

The vlaai we had was a sort of mini custard pie, served with whipped cream, and tasty ice-cream!
The vlaai we had was a sort of mini custard pie, served with whipped cream, and tasty ice-cream!

The vlaai we had was a sort of mini custard pie, served with whipped cream, and tasty ice-cream!

Cost: €3.00 – €6.50

ANYTHING ELSE?

Oh yes.

Try Dutch beer!

Cost: €3.50 – €5.00

Don't forget some Dutch beer!
Don’t forget some Dutch beer!

That’s it for now.

Book your hotel here!

See you next week!

DUTCH FOOD AND WAFFLES: WHAT TO EAT IN HOLLAND!

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!
Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

This article is not sponsored and all opinions and the marvellous Dutch food that we tasted and happily consumed, are my very own!

It’s February!

I’ll be at the Bistro France Mediatournee 2017 on 07.02.17.

If you’re a blogger or just like travelling, and you’re in town, then come and meet us at the Berlin Travel Massive February MeetUp on February 9th.

The 67th Berlin International Film Festival, otherwise known as the Berlinale, will take place from 09.02.17 – 19.02.17

Strictly Stand Up – The English Comedy Night will take place at the Quatsch comedy Club on 15.02.17. Save the Date!

If you’re not in Berlin in February, you’re missing all the excitement!

February is going to be remarkable!

Watch this space!

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!
Dutch food & waffles: what to eat in Holland!

What do you think of Dutch food? Do you have a favourite? Have your say!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!

Food in Germany: 10 delicious best German meals to try out in Berlin – Because German food isn’t as rustic as you think!

Hello from Germany!
Hello from Germany!

Omigosh!

What a week!

Last week, I reiterated over the #InterestingTimes that 2016 has produced, not knowing that just a day later, we too would have a fatal terrorist action that occurred on our very own doorstep, of my beloved Berlin.

An angel at the Sony Centre Christmas, in Berlin! ©Birgit Kaulfuss
An angel at the Sony Centre Christmas, in Berlin!
©Birgit Kaulfuss

In one of the most culturally vibrant German activities – the Christmas Market!

The Christmas Market in Germany, isn’t just any old market.

The German Christmas Market is a way in which we can socialise with our American friends in Berlin!
The German Christmas Market is a way in which we can socialize with our American friends in Berlin!

Oh dear me no!

The German Christmas Market is a way in which people can socialize with their friends, hang out, and just have a fine old time.

The Christmas Markets isn’t Disneyland or some sort of recreational park, it’s a German tradition of browsing at skilled crafts, shopping, eating traditional German Christmas streetfood, and drinking to the heath of one and all, with hot mulled wine, otherwise known as Glühwein. And for those with a far stronger alcoholic tendency than my own, trying out the “Feuerzangenbowle.”

Trying out the Feuerzangenbowle. Again!
Trying out the Feuerzangenbowle. Again!

It can reduce a grown man to tears if care is not taken…!

And then the attack.

The Christmas Market around the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church (the Gedächtniskirche) at Breitscheidplatz. In Berlin © Jens Kalaene - picture alliance dpa.
The Christmas Market around the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church (the Gedächtniskirche) at Breitscheidplatz. In Berlin
© Jens Kalaene – picture alliance dpa.

We were all so shocked at the carnage and death at the very popular Christmas Market around the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church (the Gedächtniskirche) at Breitscheidplatz in Berlin, where the attack took place in the photograph above.

It’s a Christmas Market with more than 100 beautifully decorated market stands and Christmas booths, 70 fairground rides, and lots of  German and Austrian delicacies, not far from the High Street, the zoo, and the aquarium.

We cried, and we talked about what to do next.

And let me tell you what the next step is.

Get up, brush down, wipe away the tears, keep calm, and Carry On with things!
Get up, brush down, wipe away the tears, keep calm, and Carry On with things!

The next step is to get up, brush down, wipe away the tears, keep calm, and Carry On with things!

We’re stoic, and have a stiff upper lip! 

Berlin is the safest West European city that you can ever hope to find.

Germany is open for business, and always will be.

But if you have any concerns about safety, feel free to contact me. I live here. I’m on the ground!

And so, my post this week after much reflection, and because I tossed and turned as to what to write this week, and I have a family…. this post is on:

FOOD IN GERMANY: 10 DELICIOUS BEST MEALS TO TRY OUT IN BERLIN – BECAUSE GERMAN FOOD ISN’T AS RUSTIC AS YOU THINK!

Here we go:

German stodge, such as Mutzen, otherwise known as a German fried doughnut!
German stodge, such as Mutzen, otherwise known as a German fried doughnut!

1.  When people think of German food, you can’t blame them when their impressions tend to lay on the stodgy side of things such as the Mutzen, otherwise known as a German fried doughnut, above!

Not very exciting!

And greasy!

However living in Germany has shown me that of course, German food does lie a little on the heavy side, since it was originally designed for working class peasants, but you know, the modern-day German isn’t a peasant!

Well, not all of them…

Savoury German food such as croquettes, green beans, brussel sprouts, rich venison and home-made gravy! Oh my!
Savoury German food such as croquettes, green beans, brussel sprouts, rich venison and home-made gravy! Oh my!

So you can get lovely food such as croquettes, green beans, brussel sprouts, rich venison and home-made gravy! Oh my!

2.  In fact most Germans are intelligent, tolerant, internationally minded, and open to different life experiences, and that is reflected in the food. In fact, in Berlin where I live, you’d be hard-pressed to find “real” German food!

A most delicious Bosso Spätzle! How to eat cheaply in Luxembourg!
A most delicious Bosso Spätzle!
How to eat cheaply in Luxembourg!

Austrian food. Yes.

Berlin food. Oh yes!

But German food. Eeeh! Umm!

Not quite.

“Typical” German food has a hard, long reputation of being rather stodgy and boring. Pretty much like British food actually! So let’s see what we can find, because our Christmas Eve dinner above, reminded me that food in Germany can be pretty awesome.

If you know where to look!

3.  For those of you who don’t know, the most popular meal in Berlin is not the sausage.

That very famous, most popular, Berlin speciality: The Döner Kebap!
That very famous, most popular, Berlin speciality: The Döner Kebap!

Nope! No sire!

It’s the Döner Kebap!

The kebab is made from small cuts of lamb or chicken meat which is grilled on a spit and then sliced. These slices are put into a Turkish-like loaf of bread with added raw white and red cabbage, slices of onions, tomatoes and cucumbers, and smothered with either garlic sauce, a sort of Turkish-mint sauce, spicy pepper-tomato sauce, or all of the above. The Döner Kebap can be found all over Germany and in pretty much every food corner in Berlin. Yum!

4.  ‘Remember when I said that German food is more than stodge.

Because vegetables...!
Because vegetables…!

It’s true you know, so let’s talk vegetables!

The thing that Germans all rave about is…

Wait for it…

Asparagus!!!
Asparagus!!!

Asparagus!

I know!!

White asparagus, otherwise known as Spargel!
White asparagus, otherwise known as Spargel!

Asparagus, especially white asparagus, otherwise known as Spargel, is a popular summer dish especially in season. It’s a pretty short one of just two (2) months, so we all run around, looking for the nearest farmers market so that you can get can the freshest produce possible.

Luckily for us, we have two (2) farmers markets in my neighbourhood, and one of them is less than one (1) minute away from my house!

5.  Breakfast in Germany is very different from breakfast in Britain.

In Germany, the breakfast tends to be “continental” in style.

And the best breakfast of all is a home-made one made by the very loving hands of a German grandmother!

A most delicious breakfast spread you can expect, in a typical German home!
A most delicious breakfast spread you can expect, in a typical German home!

We had a variety of cold cuts, slices of cheese, slices of ham, freshly cut paté or leberwurst, seasonal fruit, salmon, jam, butter, creams, and sauces, German condiments,  pickles, boiled eggs, a basket of crunchy bread, fruit juice, yoghurt, tea, coffee, and some seafood!

6.  Speaking of seafood.

Magnificent grilled fish over saute vegetables, covered in tomato and a cheese sauce, sprinkled with edible flowers! ©The Music Producer - Frank Böster
Magnificent grilled fish over saute vegetables, covered in tomato and a cheese sauce, sprinkled with edible flowers!
©The Music Producer – Frank Böster

Ha!

Where should I start!

This year, we spent some considerable time on both the German Baltic Sea and the German Northern Sea!

I say old boy! That’s quite a feat.

What!?!

My fish bun (Fischbrötchen) made with pickled or Bismarck herring served on kitchen foil in a bread bun (brötchen) with pickles, lettuce and huge slices of fresh raw onions!
My fish bun (Fischbrötchen) made with pickled or Bismarck herring served on kitchen foil in a bread bun (brötchen) with pickles, lettuce and huge slices of fresh raw onions!

There were lots and lots of possibilities to eat some sort of seafood. In fact, all sorts of seafood. I mean, OMG!

7.  Ah yes. Meatballs!

Are they burgers. Or meatballs!
Are they burgers. Or meatballs!

Some might even go as far as to call them burgers!

In Germany, they’re called different things. In Berlin, these German meatballs are huge pan-fried minced balls of beef, pork, or lamb and are known as Boulette.

In fact, so much so that when I first came to Germany, I didn’t know what they were, so I didn’t eat ’em! Imagine my shock when I discovered that they were actually meatballs!

I wasted two years not eating them!!

A Berlin lunch of Frikadellen, Fleischkühle, Fleischpflanzerl or Königsberger Klopse!
A Berlin lunch of Frikadellen, Fleischkühle, Fleischpflanzerl or Königsberger Klopse!

In other parts of Germany they are smaller and known as Frikadellen, Fleischkühle, Fleischpflanzerl or Königsberger Klopse!

They are not normally eaten with a tomato sauce but with bread! As you can see above, these meatballs were small, topped with apple mousse, accompanied by sliced brown bread sprinkled over with tomato, salmon, and mustard & cress, or sliced brown bread topped with cream cheese, sliced radishes, with more mustard & cress.

In fact they were quite delightful, so I scoffed the lot!

8.  Yummy in my tummy, heavenly, tasty dessert!

A frightfully enticing profiterole, choux à la crème, a cream puff or simply in Germany, a windbeutel!
A frightfully enticing profiterole, choux à la crème, a cream puff or simply in Germany, a windbeutel!

Scrummy desserts can be found all over Germany, as the cake shops are lovely.

Now I wish that I had taken a photograph of my cream puff before I actually pounced on it, but there it is!

The profiterole, choux à la crème, cream puff, otherwise known as a windbeutel in Germany, is a filled choux pastry ball with a typically sweet and moist filling of whipped cream, custard, or pastry cream. The puffs are sometimes garnished with chocolate sauce, caramel, or a dusting of powdered sugar, or simply left plain.

Mine had castor sugar, which I promptly licked off!

The most popular dessert in Berlin however, is the doughnut, otherwise known as a Berliner! And can be quite a classy affair if taken with champagne!
The most popular dessert in Berlin however, is the doughnut, otherwise known as a Berliner! And can be quite a classy affair if taken with champagne!

The most popular dessert in Berlin however, is the doughnut, otherwise known as a Pfannkuchen or a Berliner!

It’s usually filled with plum or strawberry jam, but doesn’t have a hole in it, or sprinkles…! In fact, during our wedding, our pre-lunch snack was the Berlin doughnut, otherwise known as a Berliner, with croissants, orange juice and glasses of champagne!

Cool or what!

9.  Since it’s that time of year, let’s throw in gingerbread and Stollen.

Let's throw in Gingerbread and Stollen for good measure!
Let’s throw in Gingerbread and Stollen for good measure!

I’ll tell you a secret, I don’t actually like German gingerbread, and I can’t eat the Stollen ‘cos of my allergies!

Are you shocked!

I love gingerbread men if I make it myself!
I love gingerbread men if I make it myself!

I do love gingerbread men though. The kind for children, and home-made, and that’s about it!

10.  Finally, I’m not going to leave this post without talking about street food.

A Swedish sausage made from venison, otherwise known as Hirsch!
A Swedish sausage made from venison, otherwise known as Hirsch!

The very highlight of a typical German day is the sausage.

The sausage above was served with thin slices of bread, and a venison light brown sauce. Quite yummy!

Alrighty!

All hail the almighty S!

Germany has loads of different sausages and each comes with its own unique taste.

White sausages. I've tried it every which way, but I still don't like it! ©TakeAway - Wikipedia
White sausages. I’ve tried it every which way, but I still don’t like it!
©TakeAway – Wikipedia

I find the white sausage with sweet mustard or Weißwürst quite disgusting personally, even though I’ve tried it every which way.

Ah well!

Delicious grilled pork sausages, otherwise known as bratwurst. Yum!
Delicious grilled pork sausages, otherwise known as bratwurst. Yum!

The grilled pork sausages with mustard, ketchup or both, otherwise known as Bratwurst can be decisively delicious.

My favourite German sausage however, is the currywurst. The currywurst is Berlin’s most famous sausage.

Currywurst and chips slathered with tomato ketchup, curry powder, and sometimes mayo!
Currywurst and chips slathered with tomato ketchup, curry powder, and sometimes mayo!

Currywurst!

Currywurst is beef or pork sausage grilled and chopped up, then smothered with a spicy ketchup and curry powder. It’s eaten with a pile of chips and a slice of bread or a bun. It’s such a famous icon that it even has its own Currywurst Museum where you can learn how currywurst is made, smell it, watch a film about it, attempt to sell it, and play around with the french fries and chips. You can sometimes even have chocolate and curry ice-cream!

Berlin's most famous iconic meal - currywurst, chips & mayo!
Berlin’s most famous iconic meal – currywurst, chips & mayo!

Currywurst can usually only be found in Berlin everywhere you look. My two favourite places however, are the 1930’s East Berlin historical establishment called Konnopke’s Imbiß in my own area of Prenzlauerberg, and the 1980’s West Berlin trendy establishment Curry 36, in my old neighbourhood of Kreuzberg!

p.s. They speak English in both places so no worries if you don’t speak German!

That’s it from me.

See you next year!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

FOOD IN GERMANY: 10 DELICIOUS BEST MEALS TO TRY OUT IN BERLIN – BECAUSE GERMAN FOOD ISN’T AS RUSTIC AS YOU THINK!

Tasty German Bavarian pretzels!
Tasty German Bavarian pretzels!

This article is not sponsored, and the exciting food experience that I’ve always had, is my very own!

In January I’ll be making an announcement that will either having me jumping up and down like a Jack-in-the-Box, or crying over my hot cocoa! Find out in January!

The British Shorts Film Festival will take place from 12th – 18th January, 2017

Berlin Fashion Week will take place from 17th –  20th January, 2017.

At the beginning of  January, I’ll be going to Holland, and at the end of it, I’ll be skiing in my favourite place, Rokytnice nad Jizerou, in the Czech Republic!

January is December is going to be full of excitment!

Have a great festive season, and a stunning New Year!

Food in Germany: 10 delicious best German meals to try out in Berlin - Because German food isn't as rustic as you think!
Food in Germany: 10 delicious best German meals to try out in Berlin – Because German food isn’t as rustic as you think!

Do you like German food? Is a German meatball a burger, or just a huge meatball? Let me know!

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!