When in Sweden, you’ve got to try Swedish food. Hand me my meatballs!

A Swedish hotdog in Stockholm – Sweden!

And so it’s here!

The last post that I’ll be writing about Sweden.

But what a most important post!

It goes without saying that we had a most delightful time in Stockholm, and it was truly awesome.

It was my first time to go to Sweden, but it certainly, won’t be the last. If you’re just tuning in, here’s what you missed:

Have you ever been to Sweden? Hej!
©Henrik Trygg

I’m a bit of a freak as I tend to go to places that are either in the middle of nowhere like Latvia & Lithuania, or places where you need a second mortgage such as Switzerland and Finland.

And in going to Sweden, we were well aware that we would have to tighten our budget, make the local supermarket our friend, and not go on a spending spree of gastronomic delight, as we did in Croatia!

Having said that though, I’m a strong believer that when you go to another country, you ought to try as much as possible to eat the food of the land.

Sweden was no exception.

Travelling with FlixBus to Sweden

And so my task was to visit Stockholm. Sleep in Stockholm. Eat in Stockholm. And survive the horrendous prices.

With young boy tween in tow.

Gulp!

Book your hotel here! 

When in Sweden, forget about your budget, otherwise, you won’t be able to eat a single thing!

In order to have a great time experiencing all that Sweden has to offer, you’ve got to forget about your budget, otherwise, you won’t be able to eat a single thing!

Sweden is terribly expensive and sadly, there’s no getting around it! Prepare yourself for high prices, and either suck it up, or go elsewhere!

Everybody always wonders how visitors do it, so I’m going to tell you how!

WHEN IN SWEDEN, YOU’VE GOT TO TRY SWEDISH FOOD. HAND ME MY MEATBALLS!

When in Sweden, you’ve got to try Swedish food. Hand me my meatballs!

When writing about food, it’s best to let the pictures do the talking but of course, if you have further insight, let me know in the comment section below!

WHAT IS SWEDISH FOOD?

Swedish mushrooms in the wild can be poisonous, and should only be picked by Nordic food experts!

Swedish food can be described as cultured dairy products, crisp bread, berries, stone fruits, beef, chicken, lamb, pork, and seafood.

Due to Sweden’s large North–South land space, there are regional differences between the food of North and South Sweden.

In Northern Sweden, fare such as reindeer, and game – derived from the Sami nomadic culture – are eaten. In Southern Sweden, fresh vegetables play a larger role.

Internationally, the most famous Swedish culinary tradition is the smörgåsbord, otherwise known as a help-yourself buffet, the julbord, otherwise known as a Christmas spread, and traditional Swedish dishes such as gravlax and meatballs!

Yum!

BREAKFAST:

Breakfast in Sweden!

Sweden has a unique breakfast culture whose roots are firmly grounded in peasant traditions. We were lucky to experience just how a Swedish breakfast should be, as we were staying at the Hobo award-winning design hotel!

And OMG!

The breakfast there was greeeeeeeeat!

Breakfast at the Hobo Hotel in Stockholm-Sweden, was great!
Breakfast at the Hobo Hotel in Stockholm-Sweden, was great!

There was a variety of fresh-home-made organic Nordic food, rye sandwiches with caviar (yummy!) a variety of chia seeds, nuts, coconut milk, yoghurt, fruit, juices, and smoothies.

Of course, I couldn’t actually eat most of the items on offer ‘cos of my nut allergy, but the staff were able to make me some nut-free yoghurt!

Swedish hearty rye bread with eggs & caviar!. Oh my!

In Swedish traditional homes, breakfast consists of:

  • sandwiches on hearty bread with cheese
  • bread topped with ham
  • bread and eggs
  • bread with ham or skinka
  • bread with caviar. Oh my!
  • bread with a sweet spread made from butter and whey (ala Little Miss Muffet) or messmör
A lovely bowl of porridge, milk & honey. And if you’re so inclined, a dash of whisky too!
  • porridge with milk and jam or cinnamon and sugar
  • bread with caviar, and Swedish liver pâte!
  • open sandwiches or smörgåsen
  • Swedish crisp bread or knäckebröd
  • yogurt
  • fermented milk or filmjölk
Breakfast at the Hobo Hotel in Stockholm-Sweden, was great!

Our hotel breakfast was included with our room, but if you wanted to book it separately then you could! Cost: 120 SEK or €12.30 per person.

Book Hobo here or here!

TAKE A FIKA! 

Taking a fika or a coffee break, is considered a way of life in Sweden!

Meals are expensive in Sweden, so we opted for taking a fika or a coffee break, even though I don’t drink coffee. Ho! Ho!

However, drinking coffee and eating sweet baked goods or fikabröd is a social institution in Sweden, and just like the tea break in Britain, is a traditional way of socializing, and taken quite seriously.

You haven’t lived, if you’re never tried a Swedish cinnamon bun!

Many traditional kinds of Swedish sweet baked goods are:

  • sirapslimpa  – a wholemeal loaf sweetened and glazed with syrup, treacle, aniseed, fennel, and tangy orange zest
  • yeast buns
  • cookies
  • biscuits
  • cake
  • And you really can’t mention Swedish food without talking about cinnamon buns!

In fact, most offices, schedule official time for fika!

Swedish food has a huge variety of breads of different shapes and sizes, such as this crisp bread!

In addition to sweet goods, Swedish food also consists of a huge variety of bread that comes in different shapes and sizes such as:

  • rye bread
  • wheat bread
  • oat bread
  • white bread
  • dark bread
  • sourdough bread or surdeg
  • whole grain bread
  • fine grain bread
  • flatbread
  • barkis or bergis – a sort of Jewish ceremonial bread
  • and of course, crisp bread!

Book your hotel here! 

You can also have other snacks such as:

Ärtsoppa – Swedish yellow pea soup with pancakes!
©dogstcomics.wordpress.com

Soup!

In Sweden, Thursday is traditionally known as soup day!

  • One of the most traditional Swedish soups you could have, is ärtsoppa. Ärtsoppa is a yellow pea soup served with pancakes as dessert, and has been on the Swedish menu, as far back as the Middle Ages!

Ärtsoppa is a peasant meal of thick soup made from boiled yellow peas, onions, and small pieces of pork, often served with mustard and followed by a dessert of thin pancakes or pannkakor!

Wow!

Västeras Swedish cucumber soup . Er. Yum?!
  • Västeras cucumber soup
  • rose hip soup
  • blueberry soup
  • pumpkin seeds
  • panini sandwiches
  • And hot dogs!
A Swedish hotdog in Stockholm – Sweden!

We got the hotdogs on the pier not far from the Vasa Museum and the Göna Lund. I can’t remember how much they were exactly, but they were somewhere in the vein of about €5.00 – €6.00 per sausage!

You could have a variety of sausages, spices and toppings, and The Tall Young Gentleman declared them to be quite acceptable!

Book your hotel here! 

DINNER:

This reindeer might be cute, but in Sweden, they eat ’em!
  • new potatoes served with pickled herring, chives and sour cream
  • raw food salads
  • cabbage or sauerkraut
  • mushroom delicacies or chanterelle. The chanterelle is usually served as a side dish with steak, or fried with onions and sauce served on bread
  • porcini mushroom or karljohansvamp
  • dumplings with blueberries or blåbärspalt
We had quite a nice dinner at Hearts – an American diner in Stockholm – Sweden!
  • burgers

I’m not really a fan of burgers as I have a thing about eating beef in restaurants…

I don’t like ’em!

Anyhoo. Since we were having cocktails at the ICEBAR by Ice Hotel, we decided to have dinner there too!

The Icebar is attached to the Hotel C Stockholm, and since the manager had kindly given us a 10% discount card for a meal, we happily used it!

We had quite a nice dinner at Hearts – a blend between an American diner and an Italian family restaurant. We had the Hearts Burger. Cost: SEK 175 or €18.00  per person.

Book Hotel C Stockholm here or here!

Pig on a spit.
Don’t look if you’re squeamish!
  • pig’s trotters served with beetroot or grisfötter
  • lingonberry jam – a traditional way to add freshness to stodgy food such as steaks and stews
  • turnips or kålrot, otherwise known as swede. Yuck!
  • cabbage rolls or kåldolma
  • tartar
  • reindeer
When in Sweden, you’ve got to try Swedish food. Hand me my meatballs!
  • And of course, meatballs!

Meatballs are a traditional Swedish dish, and one that that many people would recognise.

In fact, in order to get our Swedish fix, we often go to the Ikea Food Hall in Berlin, just to get a taste of Swedish meatballs.

Ohmigosh!

Of course, once we were in Stockholm, we just knew that we were going to get ourselves a good healthy portion of meatballs, with mashed potatoes, brown creamy sauce, with tangy pungent lingonberry berries, and a leafy salad.

And we did!

We went to a lovely Swedish restaurant whose staff were mostly Italian! The restaurant was slap bang in the middle of the Old Town or  Gamla Stan and our Swedish meatballs were fantastic! It was called Jerntorgiths Café. Cost: SEK 139 or €14.50 per person.

Book your hotel here! 

SEAFOOD:

I love seafood and Sweden has a lot of it!

I love seafood and Sweden has a lot of it!

As far back as 1000 AD, Sweden has been trading and preserving seafood which is salted and cured. If in Sweden make some time to try items such as:

  • crayfish or kräftskiva, which is usually boiled and then marinated in a broth with salt, sugar, and a large amount of dill weed!
  • pickled sweetened herring or inlagd sill
  • shrimp
  • lobster
  • baltic herring or surströmming
Gravlax – raw salmon cured in salt, sugar & dill, served with dill and mustard sauce. Delish!
  • gravlax – a Nordic dish consisting of raw salmon, cured in salt, sugar, and dill, usually served as an appetizer, sliced thinly and accompanied by a dill and mustard sauce or hovmästarsås, and served with bread or boiled potatoes.

Delish!

I love seafood and Sweden has a lot of it!

In order to fill the appetite of my growing sprog, I decided to go to an Asian restaurant for dinner which would kill four birds with one stone! Thus, we would be able to satisfy our craving for Asian food, seafood, the belly of a teenage boy, and without heaving to sell my soul!

  • The restaurant was in the centre of the city. It’s called Restaurang Tang. You also get free jugs of water with no hassle at all! Cost: SEK 179 or €18.50 per person.

Book your hotel here! 

DESSERT:

Swedish ice-cream!
  • Chocolate. Ughh!
  • Frozen sorrel
  • Meadowsweet  or mead wort ice-cream
  • Truffles
  • Applewood ice-cream!

I’ve got nothing left to say!

DRINKS & REFRESHMENTS:

Here’s a really good example of Swedish beer!
©Christian Lindgren

Alcohol is awfully expensive in Sweden so I only had a drink on my first night, and on our last afternoon!

  • As you  know, we spent a rather pleasant evening at the ICEBAR by Ice Hotel in Stockholm  – the world’s first permanent ice bar – sipping on cocktails and non-alcoholic champagne, in a glass made entirely of ice!
We were served cocktails and non-alcoholic champagne, presented in a glass made entirely of ice, at the ICEBAR by ICEHOTEL in Stockholm – Sweden!

That was quite delightful!

Cost: It’s cheaper to pre-book or if you’re a hotel guest. Adults 199 SEK or €20.50. Non-alcoholic drinks – 170 SEK or €17.50. Children between 3-17 years – 99 SEK or €10.00.

On the afternoon, we were leaving Stockholm, we decided to visit the rooftop bar next door!

Tak Rooftop Bar in Stockholm
©TAK /Wingårdhs

The rooftop bar next to our Hobo hotel, was called TAK!

TAK is a Nordic-Japanese restaurant, and raw / rooftop bar that literally had hundreds of people queuing to get into it, so if you’re going out of an evening, I strongly recommend making a reservation!

We opted for a little after lunch-time, and had the place almost to ourselves.

Our non-alcoholic cocktail at the TAK rooftop bar in Stockholm – Sweden!
My small Swedish beer at the TAK rooftop bar in Stockholm – Sweden!
  • We had a non-alcoholic cocktail and a small Swedish beer that was still quite reasonably priced. Cost for the cocktail (non-alcoholic): SEK 65.00 or €7.00. For the small beer: SEK 72.00 or €7.40.

Phew!

I could go on and on, but I ought to leave something for you to discover, don’t you think?

That’s it for now.

See you next week!

Book your hotel or hostel here!

WHEN IN SWEDEN, YOU’VE GOT TO TRY SWEDISH FOOD. HAND ME MY MEATBALLS!

When in Sweden, you’ve got to try Swedish food. Hand me my meatballs!

This article is not sponsored and all opinions and the delicious Swedish and Nordic food that we tasted, are my very own!

I’ve got a surprise for you. I’m going to London!

To find out why, make sure you follow me on Twitter and Facebook!

In July, I’ll be writing about the awesome time I had in Slovenia, and spending the summer in France and Germany!

On 24.06.17, I’ll be on a five (5) member academic discussion panel on Brexit, at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin!

It’s part of the Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften, or the Long Night of Sciences at the Centre for British Studies. My discussion panel will be at 20:00 and the topic will be Brits in Berlin after Brexit, so if you’re in Berlin at this time, come and watch me, and hear me speak!

From July 4th – July 7th, I’ll be at Berlin Fashion Week.

I’ll be there. Will you?

If you’re not in Berlin right now, you’re mad!

Save the Date!

June & July are going to be amazing!

When in Sweden, you’ve got to try Swedish food. Hand me my meatballs!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

When in Sweden, you’ve got to try Swedish food. Hand me my meatballs!

Have you got the balls to try Swedish food? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

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Croatia – a basic guide to food!

How to visit the Balkans: Introducing Croatia – the dream of Game of Thrones!

And so it’s here!

The last post that I’ll be writing about Croatia.

For now!

But what a most important post!

It goes without saying that my stay in Croatia was a delight. It was my first time to go to the Balkans, but it certainly, won’t be the last. If you’re just tuning in, here’s what you missed:

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!
Game of Thrones – Season 7 – Kristofer Hivju as Tormund Giantsbane & Gwendoline Christie as Brienne of Tarth
©Helen Sloan – HBO

Honestly speaking, most people have never previously heard of Croatia.

Before Game of Thrones!

I’m a great fan of the show and can’t wait to see Series Seven (7).

And Eight (8)!

I know. I’m a freakish nerd!

A traditional Busker in Zagreb – Croatia!

Isn’t Croatia somewhere in Eastern Europe?

Yes.

And No!

It can’t be both surely?

The Music Producer in Split. Geographically, Croatia is one of the previous communist states!

Well, geographically, it’s one of the previous communist states.

Don’t worry.

Breath!

However, in recent years, Croatia has managed to re-invent itself, so that even though it is actually in Eastern Europe, it’s marketed as Central Europe too!

Croatia isn’t crowded in the Spring – Locals in Zagreb – Croatia!

In truth, it has the vibe of the Mediterranean, and you’d be hard pressed not to think that in certain parts of Croatia, you could actually be in Italy, or dare I say it. Austria!

And this is reflected in it’s food!

Book your hotel here!

So let’s get started:

WHAT IS CROATIAN FOOD?

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Croatian food is defined by it’s regions, towns and villages, and has its own distinct culinary tradition rooting back to ancient times!

The best way to experience how a nation really lives, is to go to the market place and sample street food.

I adore street food as it’s ultimately the best way to get to the culture of a nation. I’ve been to many countries, and sampled many a nations’ cuisine, and Croatia was no exception!

The differences in the selection of foodstuffs and forms of cooking are most notable between those on the Croatian mainland, and those in coastal regions.

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Mainland cuisine is characterized by earlier Slavic and neighboring cultures such as Hungarian and Turkish, with the use of pork fat such as lard, and spices such as black pepper, paprika, and garlic, while the coastal regions are influenced by ancient Greek, Roman, and modern-day Mediterranean cuisine, with the use of olive oil, and herbs and spices such as rosemary, sage, bay leaf, and citrus rind.

Rustic traditional food is derived from the former Yugoslavian nations and use the same basic ingredients such as grains, dairy, meat, fish, and vegetables, with similar cooking styles such as stewing, grilling, roasting and baking.

We spent a lot of the time in coastal regions.

Take me to Dubrovnik right away!

Most ingredients used in Croatian food would be:

  • olive oil
  • courgettes
  • cabbage
  • aubergine
  • tomatoes
  • mushrooms
If you’re looking for traditional ingredients, you can get everything you need at a local street market!

Croatia has an abundance of fresh, local, seasonal foodstuff such as olives and honey, joined in recent years by a plethora of health and ecology-conscious food stores selling organic vegetables, pure fruit juices, gluten-free bread and all manner of boutique deli grocery items!

In fact, there’s absolutely no need to visit a supermarket at all!

Take a look below:

CROATIA – A BASIC GUIDE TO FOOD!

Lamb on baby green pea puree - Croatian food is most delicious!
Lamb on baby green pea puree – Croatian food is most delicious!

I could write pages and pages of what Croatian food consists of and how they make it, but instead, I’ll let the pictures do the talking and if you have further insight, let me know in the comment section below!

BRUNCH:

Booking an apartment in Croatia is by far better, than booking a hotel!

We stayed in various apartments which I found courtesy of booking.com. All were pretty huge, centrally located, and cost between €45.00 – €60.00 per nights. As a result, we didn’t really go out for breakfast, but rather for brunch!

You can opt for:

This plate of Cevapcici was certainly pretty cheap. Ho! Ho!
  • Cevapcici – a type of grilled lamb sausage dish traditionally found in many Balkan countries and actually, the national dish of Bosnia,  Herzegovina, and Serbia! It’s usually served on a plate or in flatbread, with raw chopped onions, sour cream, kajmak, ajvar, feta cheese, ground red pepper and salt. The service was slow but the food was quite delicious. Bought at Kitchen & Gruill PLAC – Cost: 39kn or €5.25
  • Soparnika (chard filled pastry)
  • Zrnovo macaroni
  • OMG! Truffles in Štrukli!
A popular traditional Croatian dish composed of dough and stuffed with cheese – Štrukli Truffles in Zagreb – Croatia!

Štrukli is a popular traditional Croatian dish composed of dough and filled with cheese, various types of filling and then cooked or baked. We found ours at a popular place where you can have a wide variety of štrukli, ranging from traditional cheese to blueberry. We had ours with truffles and sat in the very pretty summer garden. Great service. Fantastic food! Bought at La Štruk restaurant in Zagreb. Cost: 35kn or €4.70

  • Quiche
  • Scrambled eggs with prsut, mushrooms and cheese
  • Smoked-salmon platter
An Egg Benedict brunch, at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia!
  • We had brunch at this rather wonderful unique restaurant within one of the Squares of the city walls of Split! In fact, we liked the restaurant so much that we went back twice! The Music Producer & The Tall Young Gentleman both had a meal of Egg Benedict which consisted of poached eggs laid on top of crunchy whole wheat toasted bread, creamy avocado, rocket, tomato and olive oil. Bought at the cute restaurant Bepa! in Split. Cost: 30kn or €4.00
A Croatian-style “English breakfast,” at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia!
  • I had the Croatian-style “English breakfast” of scrambled eggs, crispy bacon, Croatian sausage, grilled tomato, and spicy baked beans! Again, bought at Bepa! above, in Split. Cost: 59kn or €8.00
A “Club Sandwich” beef burger, a fried egg, bacon, lettuce, & tomatoes, served with a portion of chips in a red polka dot mug and a tureen of ketchup!
  • We went back again for lunch and both The Music Producer and The Tall Young Gentleman had burgers. Here’s the “Club Sandwich” which actually consisted of a beef burger, a fried egg, bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes, served with a portion of chips in a red polka dot mug and a fancy tureen of ketchup! Once again bought at Bepa! above, in Split. Cost: 65kn or €8.80
  • Porridge with an array of snazzy toppings
Ham and egg foam pâté with horseradish cream, for Easter brunch, in Dubrovnik – Croatia!

We were invited to a complimentary press Easter brunch, along with journalists from Italy! Our brunch was at a restaurant which was opposite the Gate of the Old City of Dubrovnik.

  • The restaurant serves only Croatian food as a matter of policy, and includes both seafood and meat dishes. We had a three (3) course brunch meal and a separate dessert was made for me ‘cos of my allergies! Our ham and egg foam pâté with horseradish cream was most delicious, and something I had never had before! Eaten at GUSTA ME restaurant in Dubrovnik – press lunch – As part of an Easter brunch three-course menu – retail price – 160kn or €21.00
  • Cololino (Croatian pap)

SNACKS:

Pork sandwiches bought at the street market in Zagreb – Croatia
  • Pork sandwiches made from Istrian and Dalmatian Pršut – dry-cured ham, tucked into thick slabs of fresh crusty bread from Vis! Bought at the Zagreb Street Market on the Ban Jelačić (main) square. Cost: 21.20kn or €2.85
Mmm! Fritule – Croatian doughnuts – are quite yum!
  • Fritule – Croatian doughnuts – can be found everywhere in Croatia. Bought at the Zagreb Street Market on the Ban Jelačić (main) square. Cost: 15 kn or €2.00
A Croatian sandwich made from thick slices of mozzarella and thinly cut Miljevci prosciutto, in Zagreb – Croatia!

A Croatian sandwich made from a bread roll with thick slices of mozzarella and thinly cut Miljevci prosciutto. Bought at the cafe next door to our lovely apartment in Zagreb. Cost: 12kn or €1.70!

Book your hotel here!

DINNER:

I can't remember where ate this meal, but it was lovely! Croatia - a basic guide to food!
I can’t remember where ate this meal, but it was lovely! Croatia – a basic guide to food!

For dinner, we always strive to patronise interesting traditional-inspired restaurants. For this, we don’t scrimp, but use the opportunity to sample all that is good in Croatian cuisine.

We wanted to eat in Gornji Grad – the Old Town – The restaurant that we had our eye on was situated between the church of St. Mark, the Natural History Museum, the Museum of the City of Zagreb, and not far off from the Museum of Broken Relationships!

However, without a reservation, or a large number of heads, it proved extremely difficult to get a nice seat, or any seat at all! Of course, if you’re happy to be tucked in the outside patio, far from the action, or where you couldn’t see a thing then…

Er. Nope! I didn’t come all this way to be hidden away.

We decided to come again the next day, and this time we succeeded!

Dalmatian uštipak – fried doughnut balls – served with kajmak – Croatian clotted cream cheese ‘cos of the less-than-stellar service!

It’s a tavern-like place that is influenced by a mixture of Bosnian-Herzegovinian and Mediterranean cuisine. Sadly, the service wasn’t the best and neither was the food. Both The Music Producer and The Tall Young Gentleman enjoyed their dinner, but I didn’t!

  • The above dish of Dalmatian uštipak – fried doughnut balls – served with kajmak – Croatian clotted cream cheese was served On the House, ‘cos of the less-than-stellar service! Bought at Konoba Didov San – Gornji Grad, in Zagreb. Cost: 0.00kn or €0.00
Grilled eel with a nice side dish of roast potatoes, in Zagreb – Croatia!
  • The meal above was a dish of grilled eel with a nice side dish of roast potatoes. Bought at Konoba Didov San – Gornji Grad, in Zagreb. Cost: 130kn or €18.00
  • Wild asparagus
  • Dried pork loin and sausage with pickled cabbage
I'm not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a "cup" of roast potatoes!
I’m not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a “cup” of roast potatoes!

I’ve become quite European in nature so that I’m quite picky. In Zagreb, this could lead to not finding a place to eat!

  • Luckily, we found a nice little outfit which was small, and had a trendy bar and bistro menu. I’m not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a “cup” of roast potatoes! Bought at Otto & Frank, in Zagreb. Cost: 42kn or €5.60
  • Wild boar
  • Chicken in a wood-fired oven
  • Vitalac – skewered lamb offal
Eating frogs – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
  • Eels and frogs
  • Lamb tripe
  • Artichokes with fava beans

SEAFOOD:

A full seafood lunch of Frigadura, at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia! We liked it so much, we went twice!
  • I had a “trayful” of seafood samples or Frigadura at this rather wonderful unique restaurant within one of the Squares of the city walls of Split! In fact, we liked the restaurant so much that we went back twice! My meal consisted of prawns, shrimps, mussels and sardines, served with a portion of french fries and a fancy tureen of whitefish sauce! Bought at the cute restaurant Bepa! in Split. Cost: 95kn or €12.80
  • Crab
  • Oysters

I adore seafood so we went to a little sailing harbour in Split and found a lovely place. It was packed with Croatian locals, Italians, and lots of families with their teenage children! I was already impressed as teenagers can be so picky, but discerning!

Pasta and seafood in Split. Oh my!
  • We all had pasta seafood dishes. My Tagliatelle came with mussels, shrimps, prawns and bits of lobster in a tomato sauce. Delish! Bought at the sailing restaurant Konoba – Barkarola in Split. Cost: 75kn or €11.00
Pickled seafood – Croatia – a basic guide to food
King Prawns – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
St. Jacobs scallops with spinach risotto – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
  • Scampi
  • Butarga – salted, cured fish roe
  • Spiny lobster

DESSERT:

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

On our second night in Croatia, we went to a restaurant that is located in one of the oldest streets in the city’s old centre. In a basement that is over 300 years old! Unfortunately, the lighting was too “soft” to take good photos so I only have a picture of dessert!

Istrian custard or flawn, presented with berries & cream in Zagreb – Croatia!
Chocolate cake in Dubrovnik – Croatia. Eww!
  • I hate chocolate cake, but if you like it, help yourself in Dubrovnik. Eww!! Eaten at GUSTA ME restaurant in Dubrovnik – press lunch – As part of an Easter brunch three-course menu – retail price – 160kn or €21.00
Ice cream in Zagreb – Croatia!

Who doesn’t love ice-cream? I’m always having to be careful ‘cos of the liberal sprinkling of nuts that I seem to see everywhere these days, and the combination of chocolate! The former ‘cos I have a nut allergy, and the latter ‘cos I don’t like chocolate! I read about a trendy ice-cream parlour in the Time Out Zagreb magazine, so off we went.

  • The ice-cream parlour didn’t let us down. Bought at Millennium in Zagreb. Cost: 9kn per ice-cream scoop or €1.25!!!
  • Sweet pastries

DRINKS & REFRESHMENTS:

This glass of beer was quaffed on our Dubrovnik apartment terrace, and was a gift from our Croatian landlord!

The food culture in Croatia, as in many other Mediterranean States is that of outdoor, al fresco dining. The weather generally tends to be warm and summery, and the lifestyle in the country tends to be more relaxed.

You can, and should, take little breaks, have a snack, or a drink. The cost is relatively peanuts, and the quality is great. In fact, I found  that in many places, the cost of a taxi-ride was even cheaper than three (3) glasses of wine and a cup of coffee!

Al fresco dining in Croatia is great. So why shouldn’t you indulge?

So why shouldn’t you indulge?

Croatia has a variety of freshly – squeezed juice. Be careful when you order “lemonade” as The Tall Young Gentleman was surprised to receive freshly squeezed lemon, when actually what he wanted was Schweppes!

A refreshing jar of ginger-ale in Split – Croatia!
  • Here’s a refreshing jar of ginger-ale. Cost: 25kn or €3.40

Have a beverage at the many bars, restaurants and cafés that can be found on the very long street packed shoulder-to-shoulder!

NOTE! In the daytime, stroll around and take your pick, but by nightfall know that if you’re in Zagreb and you’re as picky as I am, you’ll probably not get to eat!

The establishments have different names but tend to belong to the same group. There might also be a very long wait for service. Make sure you keep the waiter in view so that he can keep the drinks coming. It’s expected that with each order, you pay on the spot, then order again.

A cold glass of coca-cola in Zagreb – Croatia!

You can also have:

  • Lovran chestnuts. Yuck!
  • Pag cheese
You can go to the lake in Split-Croatia, and have yourself a Karlovacko beer!
  • Home-grown Karlovačko beer
  • Staro Češko – from the Czech minority living in Croatia
  • Riječko pivo
  • Tomislav
How to visit the Balkans: Introducing Croatia – the dream of Game of Thrones!
  • Ožujsko
  • Velebitsko pivo
  • Pivo Toceno
  • Osječko: from the Osijek – the oldest brewery in Croatia!
Wine at lunch in Zagreb – Croatia!

Croatian wine has a history dating back to the Ancient Greek settlers, and many traditional grape varieties still survive. However, at first glance, many restaurants would offer me Italian or French wine instead! Insist on the local variety, which I found perfectly up to par.

  • The glass of red wine bought above at Kitchen & Gruill PLAC was cheaper than a (15kn or €2.00) glass of Schweppes!!! Cost: 9kn or €1.25!!!
  • Teran wine
  • Zlahtina from Vrbnik wine
  • Maraschino liqueur
  • Babic wine
  • Marastina wine
Semberg Rosé wine in Split-Croatia
  • The Semberg Rosé wine above was bought at restaurant Bepa! Cost: 45kn or €6.50
  • Debit wine
  • Plavac Mali wine
  • Dobricic wine
  • Vugava wine
  • Bogdanusa wine
  • Prosek wine
  • Posip wine
  • dubrovnic malvasia wine
  • Grk wine

I could go on and on, but I ought to leave something for you to discover, don’t you think?

That’s it for now.

See you next week!

Book your hotel or apartment here!

CROATIA – A BASIC GUIDE TO FOOD!

Croatian beer & Croatian coffee – Croatia – a basic guide to food!

This article is not sponsored and all opinions and the wonderful traditional food that we sampled, are my very own!

In May & June, I’ll be visiting Sweden and Slovenia!

From May 17th – May 20th, I’ll be at the Berlin Music Video Awards.

From July 4th – July 7th, I’ll be at Berlin Fashion Week. It’s going to be awesome!

I’ll be there. Will you?

If you’re not in Berlin in May, you’re crazy!

Save the Date!

May & June are going to be thrilling!

Croatian cold cuts & cheese – Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Have you ever had Croatian food? Would you try lamb tripe or eels and frogs? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!

The Tall Young Gentleman in Zagreb, Croatia

Isn’t it exciting?

I’m featured in the Metro Magazine – a lifestyle magazine in the Philippines: Metro Magazine Feature (Annual Body Issue) – Lifestyle – April 2017 Edition!

It’s a pdf for now but apparently, there’s a book coming out!

Don’t I look great!

Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Metro Magazine (Annual Body Issue) – April 2017 Edition – the Philippines!

I hope you’re enjoying the first post that I wrote about Croatia.

And I’ve got lots more where that came from!

Yes Sir!

However, this post is not only going to be about Zagreb, but about travelling with family.

I don’t often write about family travel as this blog is really all about me. And my travels!

Does it sound selfish?

It does!

Ah well!

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!

I purposely chose Croatia as a place to travel with my family for the reasons that I’ll soon be writing below, but first, let’s get the info!

Teenagers! You’ve got to love ’em!

And when you’re travelling or going abroad, you’ve got to think of things differently, as teenagers are not children per se, but neither are they adults.

They’re gangly young people, looking to explore the world, find their feet, and live life to the full.

And if you’re like me. You’ll let them do it, and give them the  gift of travel!

“The Tall Young Gentleman” didn’t look too happy that for Switzerland, we took the Sparpreis Europa city night line train!

Children are versatile.

And they don’t really need much.

All they need is plenty of food, a safe and clean place to lay their head, wi-fi, a bit of space to lay out all their “stuff”and you!

Yes, you.

The parent!

My family & I in Thailand – All smiles and bunny ears at the end of a great day at Baanchang Elephant Park.

You don’t have to wait until “they’re old enough to know.”

Believe you me. They know!

You don’t have to wait until “they understand the benefits” of travel.

What are you talking about`?

Finding slugs!
Finding slugs!

Any place that is different from home and in which they can learn about other places, other cultures, and other people, is a marvellous thing.

The younger they are, the easier it is, and the better for all!

Our son as a baby - 20 months old!
Our son as a baby – 20 months old!

I started travelling with our son when he was just 5 months old. I put him in a baby carrier, dumped all his toys and baby stuff in the car, and breast-fed him all the way!

And by the time he was 5 years old, he had been to 32 countries, and at 12, he was already talking about spending his GAP year in Thailand, so there’s that!

There is plenty to do in Lucerne so
“The Tall Young Gentleman” in Switzerland. Give your teenagers the gift of travel!

I love travelling with our son, and even though he’s just turned 15. OMG! It won’t be long until he’ll want to be travelling with his friends. Gulp!

In Northern European countries that age tends to be between 16 and 17 years old as young people are more independent, and their parents liberal, tolerant, and open-minded which is why I decided to go to Amsterdam at the beginning of the year. With our teenager in tow!

How to visit Amsterdam in two days. With a teenager – “The Tall Young Gentleman”

Interestingly enough, our German friends didn’t blink an eye when I told them. Not so my Anglo-American friends who were visibly shocked and worried.

Not to worry. Everything turned out just fine!

Book your hotel here!

And now:

ZAGREB

Zagreb is the capital of Croatia.

Zagreb is the capital of Croatia.

Zag. What?

Zaaaaaaaagreb!

Zagreb is one of the oldest cities in Central Europe as far back as 1094!

It’s located in the northern part of Croatia, just north of the Sava River, and has a population of just under 793,000 people!

We didn't have time to go to the Plitvice Lake nearby, but we'll certainly do so, next time!
We didn’t have time to go to the Plitvice Lake nearby, but we’ll certainly do so, next time!

The local name for Croat is Hrvat. You will see this word everywhere. Hrvat was a powerful military chieftain in the early Middle Ages and also another word for “friend!”

The historical part of Zagreb to the north of the centre of the city is called Ban Jelačić Square. It is composed of the Gradec or Gornji Grad /the Old Town), and the diocese settlement of Kaptol, a medieval urban complex of churches, palaces, museums, galleries and government buildings that are popular with tourists and locals alike!

In fact, if truth be told, April is so early in the season that there weren’t really many tourists at all!

I didn’t hear British voices or German ones. The tourists that were about were either American, Korean, Italian or Croatian!

The tourists that were in Zagreb at this time were either American, Korean, Italian or Croatian!

These two parts of “town” used to be divided by a river and a bridge known as the Krvavi Most, otherwise known as, the Bloody Bridge!

Krvavi Most – the Bloody Bridge – is a street just 2 minutes away from our holiday apartment!

The rather unusual name is so-called after the original bridge which used to lie over the Medveščak creek,and which gained notoriety because of the many conflicts that happened between the citizens of the two parts of “town” – Gradec and Kaptol!

Directions to the Bloody Bridge in Zagreb – Croatia!

The bridge is long gone, as is the river, but the street kept it’s name – The Bloody Bridge!

Zagreb is a small city but a city rich with history, prestigious architecture, and great connections linking Croatia to Central Europe, South-East Europe, and the Mediterranean!

Book your hotel here!

10 REASONS WHY ZAGREB IS A FAMILY DESTINATION – A GREAT PLACE FOR TEENAGERS!

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!

There’s no denying that Zagreb is very much a family destination with plenty to offer, to satisfy both parents, and their accompanying teenager. And with the help of the 72 hour Zagreb Card, courtesy of the Zagreb Tourist Board, we did just that!

Thanks so much!

Here’s why:

The Lotrscak Tower & Grič Cannon
©Patrik Macek – Zagreb Tourist Board

1.  The Grič Cannon: Every day at noon, the Grič Cannon is  fired from the Lotrščak Tower and the people of Zagreb set their watches by it. In fact, you can gather under the tower and watch the cannon come out! And without fail, the huge “Boom” will make you jump out of your skin!  I’m guessing teenagers would be too cool to show you that they almost lost their iPhones, due to the shock!

We watched it twice, and we still jumped!

The guy manning the cannon is pretty jolly, as he always waves out of the window to whoever might be nearby!

Don’t look if you’re squeamish – The Zagreb Mummy!
©Archaeological Museum Zagreb

2.  Nesi-Hensu – An Egyptian Mummy: This famous Egyptian “mummy” was a woman called Nesi-Hensu, the wife of a tailor from Thebes. The mummy was wrapped in sliced bands of a linen book which was inscribed and preserved, in the Etruscan language. The mummy was accompanied by a papyrus with a text of several chapters from the Book of the Dead, making it the longest surviving manuscript of the language, in the world!

She can be found at the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb.

Rent a bike in Zagreb. Any type of bike!

3.  Hire a local bike: The beauty of most European countries is how easy and normal it is, to use your bike. Most of the Old Town is car-free so it’s perfectly save for teenagers to ride along by themselves in and around the many parks in Zagreb, or to the surrounding suburbs and countryside.

Museum of Broken Relationships
©Mare Milin

4.  Visit a Museum: Zagreb is home to a wealth of museums including the Croatian Natural History Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb, the Museum of Illusion, and the Archaeological Museum Zagreb. In addition, Zagreb is also the permanent home of the Museum of Broken Relationships!

We had planned to go to the Zagreb City Museum otherwise known as, the Museum of the City of Zagreb, but we were too late to reach it on Sunday, and it was utterly closed on Monday! However, we managed to visit the Museum of Broken Relationships.

My husband – The Music Producer – was sceptical at first wondering how a roomful of broken hearts could cause such an attraction however, it wasn’t like that at all! It’s a quirky museum that exhibits mementos and love tokens donated from broken-hearted lovers, all over the world.

Even The Tall Young Gentleman found it interesting. I’m sure your teenager would too!

Museum of Broken Relationships
©MoBR

In some places, the stories were quite funny and in some, extremely idiotic!

All I can say is Berlin, furniture, and an axe!

Red Srebrnog Zmaja – The Order of the Silver Dragon
@Maja Homen

5.  The Order of the Silver Dragon: Each Saturday, (April – September), tourists can meet members of the Red Srebrnog Zmaja, otherwise known as the Order of The Silver Dragon at St. Mark’s Square in the Upper Town! This Order re-enacts famous historical conflicts between Gradec and Kaptol, and is a great opportunity to see authentic, fully functional, historical replicas of medieval armour!

If all else fails, take the funicular up and down, in Zagreb!

6.  Zagreb is safe: Croatia is an up-and-coming Central-East-European destination with many things to recommend it. It’s small, cheap, fresh and interesting. It’s also easy to move around by bus, tram, bicycle or simply walking around, with plenty of people-watching activity to satisfy any discerning teenager!

And if all else fails, take the funicular up and down!

Officers of the honorary company of the Cravat Regiment, Zagreb – Croatia!

7.  The changing of the Cravat Regiment Guard: Sadly, we didn’t see the Order of the Silver Dragon above, but we did manage to bump into the Cravat Regiment Guards instead!

The Cravat Regiment is part of the Croatian light cavalry from the 17th century. Apart from great valour, its biggest claim to fame was its uniform, especially the distinctive scarves its soldiers wore around their necks, which is where the cravat got its name from! The knotted scarf quickly became a popular fashion accessory, and was already known as cravat (English), Krobatten (German), and Cravates (French)!

A Regency-style Cravat tied in a bow on a Grafton collar.
©Charlie Huang

The Cravat Regiment can be found every weekend at noon, at St. Mark’s Square in the Upper Town, in which you’ll see the two-hour ceremony of the changing of the Cravat Regiment Guard, stemming right back from the 17th century, by the very same regiment soldiers who gave the tie it’s name!

I think we saw them at the end stage of the ceremony as they seemed to be recruiting for new guards, and getting certificates and medals.

At the Berlin Music Video Awards with Roc Roc It – 2015
© Pascale Scerbo Sarro

You know how I always seem to have a nose for these things so when  I spied a couple of local hacks, they took me in, and gave me some titbits. Not only was this ceremony an important part of the recruitment process, but for the first time in Croatian history, a single woman was being added to the team!

How thrilling!

Look at the magnificent view that you can only get from the tallest building in Zagreb – Zagreb 360°!
Zagreb Tourist Board – ©Davor Rostuhar

8.  Zagreb 360°: Go up to the tallest building in Zagreb, otherwise known as the Zagreb 360° – Observation Deck and Event venue!

Zagreb 360° is one of the most visited tourist attractions in Zagreb and can be found on the Ban Jelačić (main) square. In fact, you can’t miss it. Just look up!

On a clear day you can even see as far out into Slovenia!

It’s  on the 16th floor at the very top of the Zagreb Skyscraper and offers a spectacular view of the Ban Jelačić (main) square, the Manduševac fountain, Kaptol, Gradec, the Upper and Lower Town, and the most important cultural and historic structures in Zagreb.

On a clear day you can even see as far out into Slovenia!

We went up there and very much enjoyed the view. In fact, it was so sunny in some parts that it was difficult to take photographs with our iPhones!

We liked Zagreb 360° and enjoyed reading the historical posters and gallery photography, although some of the translated content was a little disturbing…!

“The Tall Young Gentleman” and I played a game of Ludo at the Zagreb 360° which he won!

Sometimes, it takes a holiday to remind you that even though your teenagers might be strapping lads and thoughtful girls, they’re still very much children. The Zagreb 360° had a number of larger-than-sized board games and so The Tall Young Gentleman and I played a game of Ludo.

He won!

My family on our walking tour in Zagreb – Croatia!

9.  Take a city walking tour: I’m a great lover of walking tours, and one of the best ways for your teenager to get to know their way around Zagreb, is to take a walking tour.

We went with a local company called the Free Spirit Waking Tour Zagreb. I believe it’s the only free walking tour of it’s kind in Zagreb!

These are just some of the people that I happened to meet in Zagreb – Actor Musicians!

Generally, the local guide is usually an expert in the area, and shows you around the city that they have either grown up in, or have come to love. It usually last about 2 hours, it’s everyday, and it’s completely free of charge, save for tips!

Our guide – Luka – was great. He really knows his stuff and is fun. And with a child in tow that counts for something. We gave him a very nice tip at the end!

10.   And lastly, the Grič Tunnel – A secret tip: Zagreb has underground tunnels!

I’ve been everywhere. Let’s go out and play cricket with the penguins!

My husband – The Music Producer – was looking for something to surprise me with! As a well-seasoned lifestyle travel blogger, it’s not easy to knock me over with a feather as I’ve either already been there, or done that! And so, he wanted to show me somewhere, and that I wasn’t to check my VoiceGuide Zagreb App, or Google!

Hard stuff!

The Music Producer & The Tall Young Gentleman at the Grič Tunnel – A secret tip in Zagreb – Croatia!

We followed him down a pedestrian tunnel in the historic neighbourhood of Grič, otherwise known as Gradec or Gornji Grad!

And we found a very huge, and very long underground tunnel!

The Grič Tunnel consists of a central hall connected by two passageways to Mesnička Street in the west and Stjepan Radić Street in the east, and four passageways extending to the south.

It was built during World War II to serve both as a bomb shelter and a promenade. However, after the war it quickly fell into disrepair and disuse, until it was used as a shelter during the Croatian War of Independence, and for dance raves in the 90’s!

We found a very huge, and very long underground tunnel – The Grič Tunnel in Zagreb – Croatia!

In 2016, the tunnel was remodeled and opened to the public as a quirky new tourist attraction. And it really does the job.

It was so hot outdoors that the coolness of the tunnel was a welcome relief. I even thought of having a picnic there!

And strangely, there are even public utilities if you’re desperate, too!

Your teenagers will love it, just like we did!

Mmm! Fritule – Croatian doughnuts – are quite yum!

That’s if for now. See you next week!

Where we stayed: Apartment Place4you – Just under €60.00 per night for the whole apartment. Wonderful!

Book your hotel here!

10 REASONS WHY ZAGREB IS A FAMILY DESTINATION – A GREAT PLACE FOR TEENAGERS!

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!

This article is not sponsored and even though we received complimentary 72 hour Zagreb Card, courtesy of the Zagreb Tourist Board,  all opinions and the enticing pork sandwiches that we happily munched through, are my very own!

In May, I’ll be writing more about Croatia, and visiting Sweden & Finland!

I’ll be there. Will you?

If you’re not in Berlin in May, you’ll miss the sunshine!

May is going to be exciting!

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!

Have you ever been to Zagreb? Do you travel with your family? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!