28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: (Nur Mit Euch / Only With You) – ‘cos Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

It’s October!

In a few days, Germany will celebrate the Re-Unification of Germany, otherwise known as, the Day of German Unity or Der Tag der Deutschen Einheit!

This most important day will take place on October the 3rd.

October 3rd is a public holiday given to the German people to honour the Re-Unification of the two German States previously called the German Democratic Republic (GDR) or DDR (Deutsche Democratic Republic) otherwise known as East Germany, and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) or Bundesrepublik Deutschland (BRD), otherwise also known as West Germany!

Me in front of a piece of the Berlin Wall & Street Art!

I cannot under-estimate how much I love this city.

I mean, I shout about it loud enough and it was just five (5) years ago that I introduced myself to you on this blog, when I wondered what the heck Berlin was all about anyway!

Oh yeah, and then I wrote a cheeky article which most people didn’t seem to get. And the title? Germany is Boring.

Oops!

I mean, what is the big deal?

Best German meals to try out in Berlin – Currywurst!

I’ll tell you what the big deal is my good man.

It’s the fact that the city of Berlin.

THIS city of Berlin.

Has been together in peace and harmony for 28 years.

That’s right.

28 years!

28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

WHY WAS THE BERLIN WALL SET UP IN THE FIRST PLACE?

The Berlin Wall after the opening of the Wall near Brandenburg Gate on November 11th, 1989!
@25 Archiv. Bundesstiftung Aufarbeitung – Uwe Gerig

It’s a little complicated but after WWII, Germany was split and divided by the allies as punishment for Nazi Germany. And you only had to look at the city of Berlin to see who the Allies were namely; Great Britain, France, USSR, and the United States.

It was not long before arguments and squabbling took place in the international political arena and simply put, the Eastern and Western Bloc decided to go their separate ways, and an Iron Curtain ensued.

East Germany went one step further and built a wall in Berlin, cutting a line through the entire centre of the city!

This wall was supposed to prevent East Berliners and citizens of East Germany from fleeing to the West, but the Wall was unable to stop the mass of people from escaping.

As a result, in 1961, the ruling Communist Party in East Germany began adding more border fortifications to the Wall, creating a broad, many-layered system of barriers.

In the West, people referred to the border strip as the death strip because so many people were killed while trying to flee.

I have seen this death wall myself as I live in East Berlin and not 10 minutes away, is the main local park called Mauer Park.

The suburb of Prenzlauerberg where I live, is now enormously trendy and gentrified, and if you’re “in,” or want to be “in,” you strive to live here.

However, let it be noted that “Mauer” in German, means “Wall.”

The Death Strip in now East Berlin but formerly French – Soviet Germany!
©Joyce, S. A.

With the downfall of East Germany in 1989, the Berlin Wall that the Socialist Party tried to use to maintain its power, also fell.

The Fall of the Wall marked the definitive end of its dictatorship.

The Berlin Wall enclosed West Berlin from August 13, 1961 to November 9, 1989.

STREETS ON BOTH SIDES OF THE WALL?

The Berlin Wall.
28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

A couple of years ago, I wrote about one of my favourite places, and where I first lived in Berlin – Kreuzberg. You can read all about it right here!

In my post, I mentioned that Kreuzberg had the Berlin Wall running right through the middle of it and that during the happy confusion, when the Wall actually fell, young people were leaving the East to go West, or leaving the West to go East!

In fact, I liked Kreuzberg so much that when I first made a documentary about being a British person in Berlin, we did the filming there!

OMG! Don’t I just look like a city babe!
©Pascale Scerbo Sarro

In Prenzlauer Berg where I live now, we’re about twenty (20) minutes from the original East-West border, and about ten (10) minutes from the first border crossing on the bridge of Bornholmer Straße.

If you’ve ever since videos where East Berliners were running through the border with everyone clapping, and cheering, and giving out free beer, it was that one!

I always take my friends to where the original wall used to be!

And let me tell you.

I weep tears of joy because even though I wasn’t in Berlin when the Berlin Wall actually fell, living in Berlin means that I’m able to touch, see and sometimes smell, what it was like to live here pre-1989!

Potsdamer Platz today!
28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

In fact, I can still remember when Potsdamer Platz was nothing more than wasteland and a piece of the border strip known as No Man’s Land. And looked like it too!

Not far off from Prenzlauer Berg, is a street called Bernauer Strasse, also known as Bernauer Straße!

Bernauer Straße as part of the Berlin Wall in 1961 – Frank Baake © Thomas Gade

As you can see, the Berlin Wall used to go right through it!

In fact, it was pretty horrid for all concerned, as you could actually see the other side of the Berlin Wall from your kitchen window, but you couldn’t go to the Western side without being shot!

Smashing through the wall! ©frizztext
Smashing through the wall!
©frizztext

Imagine the frustration, pain, and horror.

Many people tried to escape from freedom and found ways to be creative by jumping through windows, sailing across in a hot air balloon, digging tunnels underground, pretending to have a funeral and lowering the “dead” person into a pit, hiding inside the seated lining of a Volkswagen car, etc. All for a life of freedom.

Not much of the Wall is left today, which was chipped off and destroyed almost in its entirety. However, three (3) long sections still stand:

The Topography of Terror. You can still see parts of the Berlin Wall right behind it!
©Britta Scherer / Stiftung Topographie des Terrors

An 80-metre-long (260 ft) piece of the first (westernmost) wall at the now Topography of Terror, but which used to be the site of the former Gestapo headquarters!

And obviously, after WWII, the original building was razed to the ground.

The Berlin Wall, otherwise known as, East Side Gallery!

A longer section of the second (easternmost) wall along the River Spree, near the Oberbaumbrücke in Kreuzberg / Friedrichshain, which you can see throughout the 1998 cult film Run Lola Run, starring Franke Potente (The Bourne Identity), and otherwise known as, East Side Gallery!

The film and soundtrack were just so exhilarating.

Even now, 20 years later!

Bernauer Straße in both East & West Berlin!
28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

A third section that is partly reconstructed, in the north at Bernauer Straße, was turned into a memorial in 1999.

And of course, isolated fragments, lampposts, a few watchtowers, and other elements, also remain throughout various parts of the city!

On the border between East & West Berlin in Germany.

SO HOW DID THE BERLIN WALL ACTUALLY FALL?

It’s easy to forget Germany’s history!

It’s easy to forget that this situation was only 28 years ago. Most of you reading this blog, are probably older!

Let’s get some history!


2 May

Hungary begins dismantling the fortifications on the border to Austria.People demonstrate against the election rigging in front of the Sophienkirche (church).


7 May

Local elections in the GDR. Opposition groups prove that the results were faked. People demonstrate against the election rigging in East Berlin on the seventh day of every subsequent month.


4 September

First Monday Demonstration in Leipzig. 1,200 people gather outside St. Nicholas’ Church. Their demands include freedom of travel and democracy.


9 /10 September

New Forum’s initial call-out becomes a signal for change. Further grassroots movements follow.


11 September

Hungary officially opens its western border for GDR citizens, risking a breach in its diplomatic relations with East Berlin.


30 September

West Germany’s foreign minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher informs the East German refugees in the Prague embassy, that they will be allowed to leave the GDR.


3 October

The GDR government bans travel to Czechoslovakia without passports and visas, to stem the mass exodus. Special trains transport people from the Prague and Warsaw embassies to the West, through the GDR. There are violent clashes with police along the railway line, as well as in Dresden.


7. October

On the 40th anniversary of the GDR, several thousand people demonstrate in Berlin outside the Palace of the Republic.  In numerous East German towns and cities, similar protests are broken up by force.


9 October

Despite fear of military repression of the Monday Demonstration, 70,000 people take to the streets in Leipzig. The police, military and civilian forces do not intervene.


11 October

The single ruling political party calls for people to stay in the GDR, offering a “dialogue” concerning the country’s further development.


16 October

The number of people at the Monday Demonstration in Leipzig doubles. The security forces do not intervene.

 


18 October

Erich Honecker is forced to resign after 18 years in office. Egon Krenz is made the new secretary-general of the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (SED).


24 October

Krenz is also elected chairman of the State Council and the National Defence Council. 12,000 people demonstrate against his appointment in Berlin that evening.


30 October

300,000 people take part in the Leipzig Monday Demonstration.


4 November

The largest demonstration in the history of the GDR takes place in Berlin.


7 November

The government of the GDR, and the Council of Ministers collectively resign.


8 November

The Central Committee Politburo, the highest body in the GDR, resigns. West German chancellor Helmut Kohl links economic and financial aid for the GDR to three conditions: the opposition must be legalised, free elections must take place, and the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (SED) must renounce its claim to sole authority.


9 November

The Wall falls, prompted by a vague, but now famous, announcement of new travel regulations at a press conference. Tens of thousands of East Berliners rush to the checkpoints and force the border open.


22 December

The Berlin Wall is officially opened at Brandenburg Gate. The first concrete section is removed from its beams at 0.30 a.m.


23 December

The offices issuing passes for the GDR in West Berlin close for good. West Germans no longer need a visa, or have to change a certain amount of money, to enter the East.


1990 Chronology

Hurrah! Germany is now united as One as we celebrate the Day of German Unity, also known as Re-Unification Day or Tag der Deutschen Einheit!

31 August

The Unification Treaty is signed in East Berlin.


3 October

Germany celebrates the Day of German Unity, also known as Re-Unification Day or Der Tag der Deutschen Einheit!


28 YEARS AFTER THE FALL OF THE BERLIN WALL

Climbing up the Berlin Wall for Freedom! Freedom!!

It was the people who took to the streets en masse and courageously resisted a dictatorship, enabling both the Fall of the Berlin Wall and the Peaceful Revolution.

The 28th anniversary of the Fall of the Wall is important because Berlin will continue to invite locals, expats, eyewitnesses who were here, and people of the world, to participate in the anniversary celebrations, and to tell personal stories about the Berlin Wall.

The connecting element will be a gallery, the Band der Einheit or Band of Unity showing the road signs of 11,040 towns and cities in Germany that are a blend of East and West Germany, and thus, a united Germany throughout the country.

As a symbol of German Unity, the gallery will span hundreds of metres across the festival area, and will explore the diversity of Germany in a simple yet appealing way, on a journey of discovery throughout Berlin, Germany, and Europe.

More than one million visitors are expected to attend the three-day festival.

Food in Germany: 5 of the Best Ever!

There will be a diverse programme of local street music and street food, DJ sets, dance sets, and karoeke at the Bearpit in Mauer Park, and across the festival.

There will also be an orchestra, and musicians from all over the world, on stage at Brandenburg Gate, resulting in the Grand Finale of a huge open-air concert featuring German artists such as Boss Hoss, Samy Deluxe, Nena, and others.

Absolutely free of charge of course!

I’ll be there. Wil you?

Come join us!

For a full list of participating buildings, maps, and photographic displays, go to the official Nur Mit Euch / Only With You, website here!

 

WHAT IF THE BERLIN WALL ISN’T MY CUP OF TEA?

Two sides and periods, of the Berlin Wall.

As if!!

Keep reading my blog. There is more to come!

That’s it for now.

See you soon!

28 YEARS AFTER THE FALL OF THE BERLIN WALL: (NUR MIT EUCH / ONLY WITH YOU) ‘COS BERLIN, I’LL NEVER LET YOU GO!

Beeeeerlin! I’ll never let you go!

This article is not sponsored and all opinions and the currywurst and bratwurst that I’m sure to be happily scoffing in the next few weeks, are my very own!

I have so much to share with you.

I’ll be writing about my trip to Sweden, Estonia & Latvia very soon, and in the winter, I’ll be travelling to India.

Keep a look out.

Yipee!

October & November is going to be smashing.

The Berlin Wall – 28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links, I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

Have you ever been to Berlin? Do you remember where you were when the Berlin Wall Fell. Where were you in 1989? Let me know in the comments below!

 See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!

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How I got scammed in Berlin!

How I got scammed in Berlin!

It’s summer!

And that means going on holiday/vacation.

I don’t know about you, but as soon as the sun comes out, my brain begins to fry and I’m not as alert as I ought to be.

As you know, I’ve been living in Berlin for more than seventeen (17) years, and it really is one of the best cities ever.

Is it safe to travel to Europe right now ‘cos I’m scared to travel abroad?

But it wasn’t always that way!

Yep!

My beloved Berlin used to be quite a different place back in the 90’s.

Back in the day, I used to go to the Love Parade every summer, and electronic techno clubs Berghain and Tresor practically every weekend!

In fact, the gentrified areas of Mitte and Prenzlauerberg in East Berlin (where I live) today, were quite trashy, horrifying, and in some places, even dangerous!

Hence, I lived in arty, grungy, student, alternative Kreuzberg in West Berlin.

Love conquers all. We had controlled rent, but we didn’t have a bathroom in Berlin!

My boyfriend and I lived in a huge rent-controlled apartment near the river.

It didn’t have a bathroom.

It didn’t have any heating.

Hauling up steel-buckets of coal every week in Berlin, wasn’t as romantic as this!
Hauling up steel-buckets of coal in Berlin, was more like this!

And I had to haul up steel-buckets of coal every week!

It was worth it though ‘cos we were living in a 19th century building, and my share of the rent in those days, was a mere €17.00 per week!

It took me just six (6) weeks to get a well-paid teaching job, and six (6) months later, I was the Head of not one Corporate Language School, but two (2)!

One day, I went to the bank to pick up some money for a summer-BBQ party that I was organising for all our schools in Berlin at the time, and on that day, I got scammed!

HOW I GOT SCAMMED IN BERLIN!

Scammers are everywhere through Europe!
How I got scammed in Berlin!

Woah there.

Tell us what happened?

I’m coming to it.

Hold your horses!

Well, I made a few mistakes that day, and really, I shouldn’t have been so gullible.

But I was.

MISTAKE NUMBER 1:

I went to the bank & collected loads of Deutsche Marks!
How I got scammed in Berlin!

I went to the bank, collected 500 Deutsche Marks or about €1,000. (Yep. it’s that long ago!) And then decided to go into “town” a mere 10 minutes away from my establishment.

I should have gone straight back to the office instead!

MISTAKE NUMBER 2:

Most sane people would run away. I walked towards it instead!
How I got scammed in Berlin!

I saw a large crowd gathering at the town square of East Berlin’s most popular tourist attraction – Alexanderplatz. And went to investigate what people were looking at.

Most sane people would run away if they saw a crowd.

I tend to do the opposite, and walk towards it!

I should have just kept on walking!

MISTAKE NUMBER 3:

There were some men playing a sort of cup game, where if you guessed right, you win!
How I got scammed in Berlin!

There were a group of men playing a sort of cup game, where if you guess which cup the dice or ball is under, you win.

I should have just minded my own business!

MISTAKE NUMBER 4:

I stopped to watch other tourists and lost all my cash!
How I got scammed in Berlin!

I stopped to watch the other “tourists” playing and “winning.” Each and every “tourist” that played won. I thought it would be a laugh, and I could easily “win” too!

To be honest, I don’t even know why I even bothered, as I’m not the gambling type.

I don’t play cards or games for money.

I don’t play scratch-cards.

I don’t play slot machines.

I don’t play bingo.

I don’t even play the lottery.

And I’m not in the habit of “playing” with my money.

I’m far too stingy!

The cost for each “go” was 50 Deutsche Marks or €100!

I gave the man the money.

And I lost it!

I should have just taken it as a done thing, and gone back to my office.

MISTAKE NUMBER 5:

I had quite a bit of cash in my purse. And lost that too!
How I got scammed in Berlin!

I didn’t.

I’m arrogant and stubborn.

I was so convinced that it was a “game” and that I could beat them.

I decided to “play” again.

I had quite a bit of cash in my purse, so I gave the man another 50 Deutsche Marks or €100!

I lost that too!

100 Deutsche-Mark banknote or €200 – © 2016 – 2018 Bank Note World

I was quite annoyed and convinced that something was up as I had looked quite closely, and didn’t take my eyes off the “cup.”

Now I’m not mad enough to spend more money, as that cash wasn’t really mine, and I would have to replace it once I got back.

And 100 Deutsche Marks or €200 was still quite a lot of money!

So I stuck around.

And watched really carefully.

And then I saw it.

I’m not entirely sure how it’s done. But what a scam!
How I got scammed in Berlin!

The “tourists” who had “won,” weren’t tourists at all!

They were friends and mates of the game organisers and were involved with scamming pretty much each and every legitimate tourist.

Not only that, but the guy issuing the cups somehow kept the ball in his hands so that all the cups were empty!

And if, like myself, you insist the cups be checked as evidence that the ball was actually still under one of the cups, the guy then dropped the ball under the cup, in the same motion as lifting it up!

I’m not entirely sure how it’s done.

But what a scam!

I protested, and asked for my money back, but they insisted that I leave their space.

And like I said, Alexanderplatz was a rough place in those days and I still had 400 Deutsche Marks or €800 in my purse, so just to be sure that I wasn’t being followed, I took a taxi back!

What an idiot and a fool I was!

And that was how I lost 100 Deutsche Marks or €200, just like that!

HOW I GOT SCAMMED IN BERLIN!

Images of Berlin Alexanderplatz.
How I got scammed in Berlin!

This article is not sponsored, and all opinions and stupidity, are my very own!

Stay tuned.

Yay!

That’s it for now.

For more of what to do if you’ve been scammed, and how to avoid it in the future, follow my blog!

You might be well-travelled, but you can still be scammed!
How I got scammed in Berlin!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

How I got scammed in Berlin!

Have you ever been scammed? Do you think I’m an idiot? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

If you like this post, please Share it! Tweet it! Or like it!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Food!

Ha!

‘Got your attention didn’t I?!

But seriously, isn’t food a wonderful thing.

Especially German food!

Umm!

Alright then.

Some German food.

Ah.

That’s better!

Food in Germany: 5 of the Best Ever!

So I’ve been writing about Dresden the last few weeks ‘cos of the new job n’ all that. And because I want to provide a resource for those of you thinking of visiting Dresden!

And why not. Oy!

If you’re just coming to The British Berliner for the very first, or forgot about all the previous stuff I wrote on German food, here’s a reminder:

Best German meals to try out in Berlin – Currywurst!

Yum!

WHAT IS SAXON or SÄCHSISCHE FOOD?

A mixed platter of chicken with vegetables & a fried egg on top!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Saxon food is traditional food that stems from Germany!

And yes, it’s stodge by any other name!

Now mind you, when I say Saxon, I’m not referring to the original Anglo-Saxon homeland otherwise known as Old Saxony, but nowadays known as Lower Saxony, or even that of Upper Saxony otherwise known as Obersachsen!

But I’m referring to the Free State of Saxony, otherwise known as Freistaat Sachsen, or simply, Saxony!

All rather confusing!!

Having said that most of their food is pretty similar!

Saxon cuisine is quite hearty and tends to lean towards a lot of beef, potatoes, dumplings, seafood, heavy sauces, bread, a sort of soft-cheese cake, and beer!

I don’t claim to be an expert by any means, so I’ll just show you what we ate and drank, and where to get them!

Be German. Drink up at Oktoberfest!
©dapd
How to get German citizenship if you’re British – How to be a German via Double Nationality!
AUGUSTINER AN DER FRAUENKIRCHE DRESDEN
An der Frauenkirche 16/17
01067 Dresden

The first place we went to  was a restaurant called Augustiner An der Frauenkirche.

It’s enormously famous and isn’t even Saxon but Bavarian! Having said that, the food and drink was most delicious, so I’m putting it in anyway!

You can actually order traditional Saxon food too, and the location is excellent, the service was top, everyone’s dressed in traditional Bavarian costume, and it’s mere steps away from the Frauenkirche

It’s really nice, but very, very popular so either go really early, quite late, or reserve a seat!

Bavarian Leberkäse (liver cheese meat loaf) Burger at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Obviously, the Bavarian Leberkäse (liver cheese meat loaf) Burger was delish!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman really enjoyed his Bavarian Leberkäse (a sort of liver-cheese-meatloaf) Burger, served with a pretzel roll, sweet mustard, chips / french fries, and a tiny side salad!

Cost – €11.90

Bavarian stuff – Pork Roast in Augustiner beer sauce & dumplings at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Bavarian Coleslaw at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I had the Pork Roast in Augustiner beer sauce with herby bread dumpling, and Bavarian coleslaw with bacon bits!

Cost – €11.90

We all had locally brewed beer at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Drink beer at the traditional Saxon / Bavarian Augustiner restaurant in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We all had the locally brewed Saxon / Bavarian beer at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden. It was very nice too!

Cost – €4.20

OMG!

We had more stuff, but it was quite late (?!!), and the photograph was blurry, so I haven’t included them!

Believe me when I say that sometimes, you just have to put aside your values about being a vegetarian or vegan, and just go ahead, and eat meat!

Brunch at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
CAFÉ MILCHMÄDCHEN
Grunaer Str.27
01069 Dresden

We went to the Café Milchmädchen for brunch on Saturday morning. And what a brunch it was!

The Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück consisting of 2 buns, butter, salmon, shrimp-cocktail, is a really nice hangout in the AltStadt / Old Town and right opposite the German Hygiene Museum, otherwise known as the Deutsches Hygiene-Museum!

I mentioned this a few weeks ago, as one of the museums that you ought to visit, and I still stand by it!

Scrambled eggs at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We really had a most enjoyable brunch and went all out to order scrambled eggs as well as a breakfast platter!

Cost – €2.40 – €2.90

Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman and I had the Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück consisting of 2 buns, butter, salmon, shrimp-cocktail, mustard and dill sauce, and a garnish of “light” vegetables, fresh herbs and exotic fruit.

Cost – €10.90

Gourmet Käsefrühstück at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Meanwhile, The Music Producer had the three-tier Gourmet Käsefrühstück affair – consisting of 2 buns , butter, clotted cream,  and assortment of cheese, cocktail tomato, mozzarella balls, raspberries, lingonberries, kiwis, orange slices, and a garnish of vegetables, fresh herbs and exotic fruit!

Cost – €9.70

And while we’re at it, let’s have some organic beer from Hamburg. In Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

And while we’re at it, let’s have some organic beer from Hamburg, sourced at the Café Milchmädchen in Dresden!

Cost – €2.90

Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
RADEBERGER SPEZIALAUSSHANK
Terrassenufer 1
01067 Dresden

By the time we found the Radeberger Spezialausshank, we were parched!

Dresden has been boiling in the last few weeks, and that weekend was no exception. Funny how in April, we’re all burning to a crisp and by “summer,” we’ll probably all be freezing!

This historic building is famous for Dresden’s very own beer produced in 1872 – the Radeberger Pils (pale lager) and the Radeberger Zwickelbier (unfiltered beer straight from the barrel)!

In 1905, Radeberger was the favourite drink of King Friedrich August III of Saxony, as well as the first Chancellor of Germany – Otto von Bismarck in 1887 – who both gave the beer a special license and acceptance. Is it any wonder that Radeberger is still exported today and is Germany’s 9th most popular beer!

To get there, you just need to go to the Brühlsche Terrace and go down the steps of a garden & beach parasol unit. It looks a little dodgy from the distance, but once you go down the stairs, it’s a pleasant surprise to see a lovely terrace with a fantastic view of the city and directly facing the River Elbe!

You can go up the stairs from street level too!

We were thirsty, so only had beers!

Radeberger Pils at Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Excellent views & my Radeberger Pils at Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Cost – I can’t remember exactly, but it couldn’t have been more than €3.00!

Prost!

Having a nice time at Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
BIERGARTEN ELBSEGLER – THE PLACE TO BE
Große Meißner Str.15
01097 Dresden

What a lovely place this biergarten is!

The Biergarten Elbsegler actually belongs to the Westin Bellevue Dresden Hotel, and is unique in that on one side, you have the River Elbe right in front of you, and on the other side of the biergarten, you have the views of the AltStadt / Old Town.

In fact, quite a few people were playing frisbee nearby, as well as listening to music, picnicking, frolicking, or just lounging in the early evening sunshine.

It was very nice.

The Thüringer Rostbratwurst sausage at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We were a bit peckish by this time, but not hungry enough to have a “proper” meal, so opted for a famous East German snack – the Thüringer Rostbratwurst or Thüringer grilled sausage, complete with mayonnaise, mustard, and tomato ketchup!

Cost – €3.90 – €5.90

The Tall Young Gentleman & his currywurst at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Yep! A man & his currywurst can’t be parted at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Of course, being the Berliners that we are, nothing stopped us from having their version of a currywurst. It will never be the same as the original one, but it would do!

Cost – €3.50

And then we had the Radeberger Pils (lager beer) at the Biergarten Elbsegler Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Oh, and some more Dresden Radeberger beer too.

Why not!

Cost – €3.90

Frederick Augustus II of Saxony or Augustus II the Strong – the Golden Rider!
WATZKE AM GOLDENEN REITER
Hauptstraße 1
01097 Dresden

We had dinner at the rather rustic Watzke am Goldenen Reiter or the Watzke on the Golden Rider!

It’s a branch of another famous historical restaurant and brewery – the Ball & Brauhaus Watze – which is an 1838 establishment with 3 restaurants!

We weren’t all that impressed with the food, but the location is, excuse my pun, gold, as right outside the restaurant is a very golden statue of Frederick Augustus II of Saxony or Augustus II the Strong – the Golden Rider, dressed as a Roman Caesar, riding a horse, covered in gold leaf!

The restaurant also has a huge St. John’s (as in John the Baptist!) bell which is rung on the hour, in synergy with the bells across the road, in the tower of the Frauenkirche!

Pork served with sauerkraut & plums at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Knuckle of pork, sauerkraut & dumplings at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Music Producer had crispy knuckle of pork served with sauerkraut, plums, red onions, cabbage, potato dumplings, and gravy.

Cost – €12.90

Roast chicken, potato wedges, cream & mango-chili-dip at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Chicken, potato wedges & mango-chili-dip at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman had half of a roast chicken served with potato wedges, with herby sour cream & mango-chili-dip!

Cost – €8.50

A mixed platter of chicken with vegetables & a fried egg on top!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I had the mixed platter of chicken (I think!) with potato wedges, vegetables, gravy, & a fried egg on top, but sadly, I didn’t like it as it was lukewarm, and tasted like nothing at all!

Cost – €12.00 – €15.00

Watzke Pils & Watzke unfiltered beer at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

At least the beer was alright, so we washed it all down with Watzke Pils (lager) and Watzke Altpieschner unfiltered beer, brewed on the premises!

Cost – €3.80

Drinks at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
AUSONIA2
Am Neumarkt 1
01097 Dresden

AusoniA2 is an Italian pizzeria that also serves interesting seafood. It’s on the other side of the Frauenkirche.

So let me tell you, this was a Sunday afternoon, and we found it hard to find the “best seat” with views of the Frauenkirche, the film festival that was going on at the time, and just basically, a place to do great people-watching! It took a while to find a “non-sharing” table for three (3), ‘cos this is Germany, so nobody shares tables!

Ladies dressed in baroque attires – Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We got it in the end, complete with great views – locals dressed in baroque attire. Mind you, as in New York and LA, they do expect a tip, if you want to take photographs!

The pizza prices are a little hefty, but the view makes it worth your while!

Pizza at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We had the Pizza Ausonia which consisted of tomato, mozzarella, goats cheese, pepperoni, spicy salami, and olives, which I asked them to remove…

Cost – I can’t remember exactly, but it was somewhere along the lines of €10.00 – €15.00

Wernesgrüner Pils beer from Saxony at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden ©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The beers were alright, and a different brand this time – Wernesgrüner beer from Saxony!

The Wernesgrüner Pils was founded in 1436 and is even older than the Radeberger Pils! It’s known as the”Pils Legend,” because it was a bitter specialty during the communist period in East Germany.

Wernesgrüner Pils was originally a family-owned company until 2002, when it was bought by the Bitburger Brewery Group.

It’s not my favourite beer as it tends towards the side of bitterness, but if you’re into “bitters,” this is the brand I’d recommend.

Cost – €3.50

The Kurfürstenschänke historical restaurant and guest house in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
KURFÜRSTENSCHÄNKE – HISTORICAL RESTAURANT AND GUESTHOUSE
An der Frauenkirche 13
01067 Dresden

The Kurfürstenschänke is a marvellous historical restaurant and guest house, so we decided to end our Dresden family weekend right there! 

The restaurant is a beautiful 1708 property with charming baroque architecture, high ceilings, and elegant seating, and just seconds away from the Frauenkirche!

It also serves  Saxon / Bohemian dishes, exquisite gourmet meals, as well as hearty rustic traditional food!

It’s a three level restaurant and surprisingly larger than you would expect, so plenty of seats. We preferred to sit on the outdoor terrace as it was such a hot, sweltering day.

Pork steak at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman had marinated bone roasted pork steak in beer mustard sauce, roasted onions, roasted bacon strips,with potato and cucumber-dilled salad!

Cost – €12.50

Ox cheek at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Music Producer had Ox cheek in gravy, herb curd dumplings, and grilled vegetables with ramson oil!

Cost – €13.90

The cold cuts & chesse platter at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Fürstenbrot / Aristocratic bread at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I was already pretty stuffed so opted not to have a “real meal” but a platter of Ratsherrenplatte which consisted of Leberkäse – a type of “liver-cheese” bread loaf, Thuringian red sausage, Pfefferbeißer – a dried, smoked, peppery German sausage made in sheep casings, slices of roast pork, Saxon cheese, pickled cucumber, tomatoes, butter, a side salad, and Fürstenbrot or Prince (aristocratic) bread!

Cost – €10.90

Champagne at the Kurfürstenschänke historical restaurant and guest house Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Needless to say, the best way to end a splendid weekend is with a sparkling glass of champagne.

What say you?

Cost – €4.20

Other Saxon dishes are:

  • The Dresdner Eierschecke – A type of layered cake made from yeast dough topped with apple, quark (curds), poppy seeds and covered with a glaze of egg, sugar, flour and cream!
  • Quarkkeulchen –  A type of cream-cheese ball made from cream cheese, eggs flour, mashed potatoes, and spiced with cinnamon or raisins!
  • Kalter Hund or Cold Dog – A type of square-shape chocolate cake made into hedgehog slices of chocolate, crushed biscuit, rice crispies, and with a topping of chocolate icing sprinkled with items such as coconuts, hundreds and thousands, and other toppings
  • Wickelkloß – A type of potato dumpling spread with butter, and sprinkled with breadcrumbs!
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen – German Gingerbread!
  • Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen – A type of traditional gingerbread made from chocolate and honey
  • Sächsischer Sauerbraten – A German pot roast marinated in vinegar, water, herbs, spices, and seasonings, served with red cabbage, dumplings, potatoes or Spätzle (Schwabian pasta), and made from  beef, venison, lamb, mutton, pork, or horse meat!
  • Radeberger Biergulasch – A type of goulash cooked in Radeberger Pils beer!
The Dresdner Stollen
  • And of course, Dresden’s most important Saxon item – The Dresdner Stollen – A type of rectangular-shaped fruit cake made from nuts, spices, dried or candied fruit, raisins, almonds, nuts, marzipan, and coated with icing sugar.

The Dresdner Stollen in particular is most beloved, as Dresden is considered to be the home of the original Stollen, as far back as 1474!

Dresden Stollen is produced in the city of Dresden and distinguished by a special seal depicting King Augustus II the Strong. This “official” Stollen is produced by only 150 recognised Dresden bakers!

It’s one of Germany’s most traditional items, is eaten during the Christmas Season, and can usually be found at most Christmas Markets, especially the Dresden one, otherwise known as the Striezelmarkt – one of Germany’s oldest documented Christmas markets ever, founded in 1434!

Yay!

A 5 MINUTE GUIDE TO SAXON FOOD IN DRESDEN. NOW ISN’T THAT JUST CUTE!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

This article is not sponsored, and all opinions and all the Saxon food that I noshed and slobbered over, are my very own!

In a few weeks, I’ll be revealing my next summer trip!

Stay tuned.

Yay!

That’s it for now.

See you next week!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

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A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

Do you like German food? Have you ever heard of Saxony? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

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