A Beginners’ Guide to the Berlinale / The Berlin International Film Festival 2018. Or any other Film Festival!!

Ed Sheeran at the Berlinale – Songwriter
© Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin

OMG!

It’s a little late, but since you’ve all been using my previous posts to get started, I don’t feel in the least bit guilty, ‘cos I’ve been on the go!

Go!

Go!!

I’ve told you before and I’ll probably tell you a million times over, living in Berlin is awfully fabulous!

I mean, there’s just so much to do!

I haven’t been back to Manchester for quite some time!

Only a few weeks ago I was telling you all about how I could afford to travel all over Europe, and using the train no less, as well as rambling through the English countryside, floating through Berlin Fashion Week, rushing through Bruges in Belgium, gaining Dual Citizenship ‘cos I’m a real British-German now, preparing for India, and exploring Hamburg on a press trip!

And just the other week, the Sputnik Kino put out all the stops to bring us the British Shorts Film Festival too!

Book your hotel here!

Robert Pattinson at the Berlinale – Damsel – What a sexy gorgeous bloke!
© Gerhard Kassner / Berlinale

And now, ladies and gents, the red carpet has been rolled out yet again, and Berlin has been hobnobbing with the best of the best. I mean, if it’s good enough for Bill Murray, Helen Mirren and Robert Pattinson. It’s surely good enough for you!

And why forsooth?

Because?

Because the 68th Berlin International Film Festival, otherwise known as the Berlinale, is in town!

Now for those of you interested in getting a piece of the action it’s quite easy.

Book your hotel here!

WHAT IS THE BERLIN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL / BERLINALE?

My press pass & bag at the Berlinale
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018

Well, the Berlinale is simply, the world’s largest public film festival which provides an audience of interested film-goers, a city full of excitement, a diverse cultural scene, fascinating new films, up and coming artists, and an opportunity to see, talk to, and take close-up pictures, of international stars in the movie world!

The public programme of the Berlinale shows about 400 films per year, mostly international or European premieres of every genre, length and format! Formats such as epic international cinema (Competition), independent art house (Panorama), films for a younger audience (Generation), new discoveries and promising talent from the German film scene (Perspektive Deutsches Kino), avant-garde, experimental cinematography (Forum / Forum Expanded), “exotic” cinema from the Weimar Republic / post World War I historical black and white documentary filming (Retrospective), film classics / rediscovered films (Berlinale Classics), cult films curated by the Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum für Film und Fernsehen (Homage), films about food (Culinary Cinema), art house cinemas within Berlin (Berlinale Goes Kiez), cinematic story-telling of Indigenous people around the world (NATIVe – A Journey into Indigenous Cinema), new and extraordinary productions via the honouring of influential cinema personalities, and short pieces (Berlinale Shorts).

The Berlin International Film Festival is a source of inspiration in the global film community, encouraging the influx of film programmes, workshops, panel discussions, joint projects, and other creative outlets and networking possibilities via the European Film Market (EFM), the Berlinale Co-Production Market, the Berlinale Talents which introduces high-profile professionals to 250 promising young international film makers, the World Cinema Fund (WCF) which provides financial support to film projects in countries with weak film infrastructure, and the Berlinale Residency programme which offers international directors, financial support and funding to live in Berlin for a few months, and to start their next film project.

Yeah baby!

Book your hotel here!

Victoria & Wes Anderson. And a lady who accidentally photo-bombed us! –
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018

And with more than:

  • 334,000 sold tickets
  • 21,000 professional visitors
  • 127 countries
  • 3,700 journalists
  • Art
  • Glamour
  • Parties
  • Networking
  • The Business of Film-Making

 

I’m actually in the video above. This was the first “star” Press Conference at the Berlinale, and I’m standing right behind the journalist who asked Bryan Cranston that super interesting question!

You simply can’t go wrong!

That’s right.

From the 15th of February to the 25th February, 2018, Berlin will be packed solid, with members of the film industry.

My heart swells and is almost fit to bursting, when I know that Berlin is competing with the likes of other film festivals, in Cannes, and Sundance.

Alright, not in the same category, but still.

In my opinion, a festival to be proud of!

With more than four hundred (400) films, fifteen (15) categories sections, and more than half a million cinema visits, the Berlinale is not only an independent film festival with a difference, but also a film festival that ordinary people can actually visit.

Book your hotel here!

Ordinary punters at the Berlinale. You know. People like YOU!
© Peter Kreibich – Berlinale Goes Kiez

Yes, that means YOU!

A world international festival can sometimes be daunting, so I’m going to try and make it as easy as possible, so that you too can participate. If you want to!

Read my beginners’ guide and find out how!

A BEGINNERS’ GUIDE TO THE BERLINALE / THE BERLIN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2018! OR ANY OTHER FILM FESTIVAL!!

Punters waiting to see Bill Murray & other stars, so be prepared & wrap up warmly!
© Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin
  • BE PREPARED: The Berlinale always takes place in February so get yourself on the mailing list of the Berlinale, so that you know when the official Berlinale programme is published.
  • USE THE INTERNET: There is a Berlinale homepage in both English and German. On the homepage is a Programme Section which also has a most valuable item called the programme planner. Use this item to search for films so that you have an idea of what you might want to see BEFORE the film festival begins.
Search for a programme at the Berlinale
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018
  • GET THE PROGRAMME: If you’re not entirely sure what each film is about, you can either download the pdf format or if you’re in Berlin (and why wouldn’t you be!), you can pretty much find the programme brochures / publications in every cinema forum in the city. It’s free of charge. Just help yourself!
  • USE TECHNOLOGY: Not only can you use the programme planner for your personal searches but you can also get into the 21st century and, for the first time ever, download the Apps (for Android and iOS) which links into the programme planner so that you can mark your favourite film or event at home, or on the move, and still remain up-to-date across multiple devices. The app also provides Berlinale information about Press Conferences and Photo Calls, festival venues, festival events and an overview of festival video broadcasts, the Opening and Closing Gala, as well as all the fun on the Red Carpet!

Relax & check my social media feed about the Berlinale, on Twitter & Facebook!

  • USE SOCIAL MEDIA: The Berlinale is on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and YouTube – #Berlinale. You can also follow my Twitter titbits and little quips here! Not only that, but around the Potsdamer Platz Arcade, WiFi is available for 2 hours per day per person, and there are other WiFi hotspots scattered around in various venues. For free!
  • MAKE A LIST: Once you have a rough idea of what you want to see, go ahead and make a list. Don’t forget to put the date, the name of the film in it’s original language and in English, the venue, and the time. Then make a second list with different films. Just in case.
  • And a third one too!
Look at the packed crowd for the World Premiere of The Bookshop, at Friedrichstadt-Palast. Aim to arrive early!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018
  • CHECK THE FILM TIME: People get really excited when punters finally get the film of their dream and then discover soon after, that they can’t actually watch it, ‘cos they’re still at a previous showing! Just because the film states a starting time of 20:00 doesn’t actually mean that it’s going to start at 20:00! Films start late, discussions over lap. Deal with it!

I find that putting films three (3) hours apart generally leaves more than enough room to manoeuvre. So, if for example, a film starts at 09:30, the next film I book is at 12:30 and not anything less! Most films tend to last between 80 and 100 minutes but you want to give yourself time for overlaps, and also for getting from A to B. Berlin’s public transport system is fantastic but you still have to wade your way through the crowds to get out of the venue itself, and then go downstairs to your next train station, not to talk of wading yourself through more crowds, at the next film venue!

  • LEAVE EARLY: Doors generally open 10 – 15 minutes before the film starts, so make sure you’re in the queue at least 20 minutes before the movie begins. If it’s a popular film, give yourself 30 minutes, as there is no allocated seating. First come, first served n’ all that!

No seat is a dud in my opinion, but if you have preferred seating, or want to get comfy with the new plush seats available in some cinema venues, then get there early.

Get your Berlinale film tickets in person!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018

This means that you’re going to have to gird your loins, get all your mates together and be smart and efficient. Each individual can only buy 2 tickets per film, except for Generation (children / youth films) which you can buy 4 tickets at a time, and Culinary Cinema film screenings at 19:30, and you can buy as many as you like!

You can of course, cross your fingers and buy on the day if tickets are available at the box office of the cinemas themselves. Ticket counters open daily from 10:00 to 20:00, with people forming a queue from as early as 08:00!

Oh, and don’t forget.

For Same-Day tickets, only hard cash is accepted!

If you don't feel up to being with the rabble, not a problem, use your fingers and go online to buy tickets at the Berlinale instead!
If you don’t feel up to being with the rabble, not a problem, use your fingers and go online to buy tickets at the Berlinale instead!
  • BUYING TICKETS ONLINE: If you don’t feel up to being with the hoi polloi, not a problem, use your fingers and go online instead! On the programme page is an online ticket icon. If you click on it, you’ll be directed to the online ticket shop but be warned, the other buyers are keen film-goers and pros. at this game. You’ll need firm fingers to keep clicking and refreshing, in order to get those tickets. Or better still, allocate yourself an army of friends to help you.

You know how concert tickets sell out in 10 minutes? Yep! They use the same method. Friends! Mates! Neighbours! Everyone you know!

Grab a few friends to help you buy your Berlinale ticket!
Grab a few friends to help you buy your Berlinale ticket!

If you click on the Online Tickets icon, you will automatically be forwarded to the website of the Berlinale ticketing partner – Eventim. You’ll have to create an Eventim account with an extra processing fee of €2.00 per ticket. You can also use a major credit card and the tickets will be delivered to you either by Email, on your mobile phone, or you can simply pick the tickets up at the Online Ticket Pick-up Counter in the Potsdamer Platz Arcade shopping centre, by showing your printed confirmation and some sort of ID card.

There’s also an exclusive ticket counter, only for punters with MasterCard!

Book your hotel here!

Berlinale ticket prices are very reasonable! –
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018
  • TICKET PRICES: Berlinale tickets are generally between €4.00 – €20.00! A 50% discount is available for selected last-minute tickets and of course, if you’re a student, of school age, on welfare, etc, then a 50% discount on tickets are available too.

If you register by telephone for Generation tickets, groups of at least 5 people or more, can buy their tickets at a cost of just €2.50 each!

Roll up! Roll up! Queue up & come & get your ticket!
© Peter Kreibich – Berlinale Goes Kiez
  • NO TICKET: If you still haven’t got the ticket you want, then go ahead and get any other film ticket instead!

The whole point of a film festival are the intriguing films that are made available. Every film has passed muster, and outside of your own personal preference, none of the films are duds.

Go on live a little!

If you’re still unsure, then go to the venue of your choice and either hold out a sign that you’re looking for an extra ticket, or look for individuals who might want to sell theirs. Don’t deal with touts though. If the individual looks nice enough and has 1 or 2 tickets rather than 20, and is willing to sell it at market price, or even cheaper, then go for it!

  • WATCH YOUR THROAT: After watching quite a few films, the throat does tend to take a bit of a beating as the rooms can get a bit dry, so arm yourself with water and cough drops. Take a scarf too, in case the air-con is at full blast!
A film industry and press-only conference – Isle of Dogs – Berlinale!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018
A film industry and press-only conference – Isle of Dogs – Berlinale!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018
  • PRESS: If you’re a press person, you should have been through the accreditation process and have your badge and Berlinale gift bag!

This year, a dedicated Press Screening Guide was made available. And it has been a godsend!

The press brochure / guide has information about press screenings, and other events that are available to accredited journalists and media representatives.

And I used the Press Screening Guide to the full!

Nevertheless, even press people have to organise themselves, as film tickets are only made available one (1) day prior, and so I found myself checking into the Grand Hyatt Berlin on a daily basis!

At 08:00 in the morning. Eeek!

Book your Berlin hotel here!

After a hard day at the Berlinale, surely I deserve a glass of champagne! –
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018

On the other hand, free water, free coffee (Ouch!) free WiFi, a press room, comfy seats, and a quick means of getting all the press stuff and press tickets that you need, are provided.

Everyone has been so helpful and kind and because I’m now a pro. I also managed to get 99% of the film tickets that I wanted. However, on the very last film festival day, I ended up buying another ticket at the cinema box office, as press tickets were in limited supply, and I really wanted to watch the Generation 14+ film – Adam!

All in all, I pretty much got every film ticket that I wanted.

Thank you Berlinale Press Team!

River’s Edge by Isao Yukisada – Fumi Nikaidou & Ryo Yoshizawa
© River’s Edge Film Partners, TAKARAJIMASHA / Kyoko Okazaki
  • BE OPEN TO A NEW EXPERIENCE: I love going to film festivals and one of the main reasons is that in many cases, the films that you get to see at such events will never be shown at regular cinemas, or ever at all!

I mean, I hardly doubt that a weird film about a businessman who’s so burnt out, that he spends 14 days eating apples in a monastery in Burma, a mother and daughter who spend all day screaming at each other in Beijing, a black and white film about illegitimate foster children in 1920’s Germany, or an old couple who also happen to be traditional reindeer hunters, living all alone in the North Pole, is going to be shown at a local cinema near you!

I really don’t think so!

In my case, I aim for weird Asian films, obscure East European films, Anglo-American films with controversial topics, German films with a twist, and films over issues that I would never usually go for, ‘cos they’re just not shown at your local flick!

Ága by Milko Lazarov – Feodosia Ivanova & Mikhail Aprosimov
© Kaloyan Bozhilov
  • STAY FOR Q&A: The beauty of an international film festival or any film festival at all, is that everyone tends to be there. You get stars such as Bill Murray, Helen Mirren, Jeff Goldblum, Emily Watson, Bill Nighy, Natalie Dormer (Game of Thrones), Robert Pattinson, Emily Mortimer (The Newsroom), Joaquin Phoenix, Rosamund Pike, Jim Broadbent, Tilda Swinton, Daniel Brühl, Mia Wasikowska, Liev Schreiber, Hugo Weaving and Ed Sheeran. Directors such as Wes Anderson (The Grand Budapest Hotel), Idris Elba (Luther), Rupert Everett (The Importance of Being Earnest), Steven Soderbergh (the Ocean’s Trilogy), and other directors, producers, and actors.

In fact, everyone!

Helena Bonham-Carter sat behind me at the Berlinale,and I hadn’t even noticed, until she got up to go to the front of the stage!
© Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin

Four years ago, Helena Bonham-Carter sat behind me and I hadn’t even noticed, until she got up to go to the front of the stage!

Actors, directors and producers tend to go out to the front and apart from staring at them really closely, you can ask them questions about their films or their thoughts, surrounding that film. And being that this is Berlin, everyone’s really chilled and not freaking out, or going crazy!

Not inside the cinema theatre in any case.

Idris Elba – Director of Yardie – Zoo Palast – Berlinale
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Berlin – Feb 2018

If there’s a hottie on the red carpet like George Clooney, Richard Gere, Idris Elba, or Natalie Dormer, all that flies out of the window, and people start screaming!

I mean, it sometimes goes insane.

Natalie Dormer was here to promote Picnic at Hanging Rock, & all I could think of was Game of Thrones!
© Thomas Lobenwein – Berlinale Series

The actors are always calm, professional and charming (especially George, Richard, Idris, & Natalie. We’re on first name basis now of course..!) but the audience just lose themselves with star-lust, over-whelmingness, or the fact that film premier tickets can sell out surprisingly quickly, and not be found for love or money. If you didn’t know somebody, who knew somebody, who knew somebody, way up there, chances were, you wouldn’t get a look in!

The atmosphere once you get indoors, really is comforting and quite frankly, it’s nice.

Helen Mirren at the Berlinale. Because anyone who matters is here!
© Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin

And all for the price of a cinema ticket.

Less in some cases!

  • MAKE FRIENDS: Chat to the person next to you. Find your friends and partners and go for a well deserved late night drink!
We’re so chilled in Berlin. Bring your beer in at the Kino Casablanca. And make friends!
Berlinale Goes Kiez -© Peter Kreibich
  • TAKE ACTION: Now that you know what to do, go ahead and get yourself a film ticket, and do it all over again the next day!

See you at the Berlinale!

A BEGINNERS’ GUIDE TO THE BERLINALE / THE BERLIN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2018! OR ANY OTHER FILM FESTIVAL!!

Willem Dafoe receiving his Homage – Honorary Golden Bear Award at the Berlinale
© Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin

This article is not sponsored and even though I received press tickets, all opinions and the brilliant festival films that I chose, are my very, very own!

It’s February!

I have so much to share with you.

Next week, I’ll be reviewing the films that I saw at the Berlinale.

February is enjoyably rushed!

Catch me if you can!

Visitors and members of the press at the Berlinale
© Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

A Beginners’ Guide to the Berlinale / The Berlin International Film Festival 2018. Or any other Film Festival!!

Have you ever been to a film festival? What actor would you like to see on the Red Carpet? Let me know!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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How to get German citizenship if you’re British – How to be a German via Double Nationality!

28 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Berlin, I’ll never let you go!

Yes!

It happened!

OMG!

So a fortnight (two weeks) ago, was a really great day.

Have you ever been to Blackpool – Britain’s version of Las Vegas – OMG!

As you all know, I’m a very proud British person.

However, after the very disappointing result of the Brexit Referendum in 2016, many of my fellow British citizens began to wonder whether the discussions and talks would lead to a better understanding of British / European relations, or a hardline stance.

Berlin – very British – rbb

I’ve always been determined to remain British to the core.

Indeed, I even told a reporter of the Bloomberg newspaper that the only way you would get me out of this country, would be kicking and screaming!

But the writing on the wall was crystal clear, that British – European relations was not going to get better anytime soon, but effectively worse.

So at the end of 2016, I changed my mind, and decided to apply for double nationality.

I love both England – my original birth country, and Germany – my adoptive new country, and I don’t see why I should have to choose! ©Reuters

There is no doubt in my mind that regardless of the dismal politics, I love both England – my original birth country, and Germany – my adoptive new country, and I don’t see why I should have to choose, as I have spent a lot of my life and money, in both.

In fact, I’ve written about both how to be British and how to be a German.

And, I’m not alone!

Put the kettle on. We’re going to be here all day!
How to be a German – 10 ways to do it!

Basically, I want to be both British and German, and to effectively have the best of both worlds!

And while the UK is still in the EU, I certainly can!

Now for British citizens living on the European continent, and European citizens living in the UK, what’s next, is a constant worry, and I attend many a meeting, press sessions and network groups, on this very question.

If you’re British, & have the opportunity to apply for European citizenship anywhere in the EU, do so as quickly as possible!
©Dr. Meddy – The Cartoon Movement

If you are British, and have the opportunity to apply for European citizenship anywhere in the EU, do so as quickly as possible, as the clock is ticking, and even though 2018 has only just begun, 2019 will be upon us sooner than you or anyone else anticipated, and then it will be too late.

If you’re a British national of Irish descent or anybody born in Northern Ireland, you have the right to acquire Irish citizenship, so if there’s a whiff of Irishness in your ancestral tree, go and get it!

I can’t tell you what to do and where to choose, but I can give you some simple tips and guidelines as to how to apply for German citizenship, if you’re British.

HOW TO GET GERMAN CITIZENSHIP IF YOU’RE BRITISH – HOW TO BE A GERMAN VIA DOUBLE NATIONALITY!

I’m not a lawyer, so you should seek legal advice!

Before we go any further, let me make it clear that I am not a lawyer, so if you need legal advice, go ahead and contact an expert specialised in naturalisation / citizenship matters. This post is based on my personal experience. I assume no liability for the accuracy of the enclosed data.

Right, now that’s out of the way, let’s go on.

THE RULES:

How to get German citizenship if you’re British – How to be a German via Double Nationality!
  • If you live in Germany permanently, and have done so for at least 8 years, you can apply for German Citizenship
  • If you’re a member of the EEA, a Swiss citizen, or the EU, citizenship is not required. EU law allows for the Freedom of Movement Act which effectively means, that you can live in any Schengen country, whenever, and however you like
If you’re highly qualified in fields such as science, research, IT, or have a firm job offer, immediate permanent residence is usually offered in Germany!
  • If you’re highly qualified in fields such as science, research, IT, or have a firm job offer, immediate permanent residence is usually offered
  • If you’re a self-employed entrepreneur, Germany is happy to have you
  • If you have German skills, can support yourself financially, have health insurance, and no criminal record, residency shouldn’t be an issue

Then there is naturalisation.

HOW TO APPLY FOR GERMAN CITIZENSHIP via NATURALISATION OR DOUBLE NATIONALITY

Summer in Germany – Simply the Best!

WHAT DOES NATURALISATION MEAN?

How to apply for German Citizenship via Naturalisation or Double Nationality

Legally, naturalisation (or naturalization) is the documented act or process, by which a non-citizen, may acquire citizenship or nationality, of another country. This may be done by statute, without any effort on the part of the individual, or it may involve an application and approval by legal authorities.

Britain opted to leave the EU, therefore, after March 2019, no UK citizen will have automatic free access to the EU, and no EU citizen will have automatic free access to the UK either.

This has brought about a Pandora’s box of conflicting problems.

This also means as a UK citizen, if you live in the EU and wish to ensure a continuation of EU rights, then the path to go down for legal certainty is either naturalisation, or double nationality.

WHAT DOES DOUBLE NATIONALITY / DUAL CITIZENSHIP MEAN?

Can you have dual citizenship / double nationality, and not know it?
©i.redd.it

Double Nationality or Dual Citizenship, is the concept where an individual is a national or citizen, of two countries at the same time.

In Germany, it’s the norm to give your nationality up, in order to get German citizenship. However, German law permits certain people to hold two citizenships if:

  • A child, with a parent who has double nationality
  • A child, who has one German and one foreign parent, and therefore, automatically acquires all the citizenships their parents have
  • A person of ethnic German descent
  • A German citizen who also holds citizenship of another EU country, or Switzerland

If you have Double Nationality, under German law you are viewed as a German citizen, and have the same rights as any German National. However, you lose your right to claim German consular protection if you chose to live in your original home country, (or any other country where you hold citizenship). In this case, you will be viewed by that country as one of its citizens, and their own services will apply

I chose double nationality.

The Tall Young Gentleman and the Boy Scouts of America – Troop 46 – Berlin. Having German, British, American & French dual citizenships / double nationalities, works just fine!

Either way, there’s a lot of red tape to get through.

There was a time, when there was an unwritten thing about fast-tracking Brits who wanted to become German citzens before the Brexit Referendum, but that’s stopped now…

I choose to have both German and British passports!
©DPA

According to the BAMF – Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge, otherwise known as the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, the process of Naturalisation is extremely challenging, and can only occur under certain circumstances and conditions.

THE CONDITIONS:

My beer at the NeuenSee lake in Berlin!

You have a right to Naturalisation, if you fulfil the following conditions:

  1. You have an unrestricted right of residence, at the time of being naturalised
  2. You have passed the Naturalisation Test (knowledge of the legal and social system, as well as living conditions in Germany)
  3. Your habitual, lawful place of residence has been in Germany for at least eight years (this period can be reduced to seven years if you attend an integration course and pass, and can be reduced to as little as six years, in the case of special integration measures. A reduction can also be made for marriage, the co-naturalization of spouses and children, foreign spouses of Germans, or under the laws of asylum or refugee status
  4. You have independent means of securing a living (including dependent family members), without resorting to social welfare payments or unemployment benefits (Arbeitslosengeld II)
  5. You have adequate German-language skills
  6. You do not have any criminal convictions
  7. You are committed to the free democratic constitutional order of the Basic Law of the Federal Republic of Germany
  8. You have lost or given up your former nationality (exceptions apply, depending on the country of origin)

It is however possible to obtain “discretionary naturalisation.”

This means that the naturalisation authority can agree to naturalisation if there is public interest in your Naturalisation, and some of the basic requirements have been fulfilled.

CHILDREN:

Children under 15 travelling inter-city or inter-country, with their relatives, usually travel on the European train, for free!
  1. Children born in Germany have an automatic right to German nationality if their mother, their father, or both parents, are German
  2. Children of foreign nationals take German nationality if they were born in Germany and if, at the time of their birth, Germany was the habitual, lawful place of residence of at least one parent for eight years, and the parent has unlimited right of residence
  3. Children of foreign nationals, must decide when they are aged between 18 and 23, whether they wish to take up German nationality, or retain the nationality of their parents
The Music Producer and “The Tall Young Gentleman” in beautiful Osnabrück, Germany.

Luckily for us, The Tall Young Gentleman is half German (by virtue of his German father) – half British (by virtue of his British mother – me) by birth, and has always been entitled to both nationalities.

I’m extremely glad that I had the foresight to register him at the British Embassy in Berlin, at birth, and have it recorded on his birth certificate too!

As far as being British is concerned, point Nr. 8 above “you have given up your former nationality (exceptions apply, depending on the country of origin)” is extremely important, because the way to bypass that point as of now, is still double nationality. After 2019, if you are British, you’ll have to choose.

HOW DO YOU START THE PROCESS OF NATIONALISATION / DOUBLE NATIONALITY:

Now that Brexit & Article 50 has been triggered, as an island nation. We’re out. Alone.
  • The first thing you have to realise is that the clock is ticking, and the UK government is not backing down from Brexit, so if you want double nationality, you ought to start processing it. Like YESTERDAY!
  • Next, you must submit an application.

Parents can make an application for children who are under 16. Anyone over 16, must submit their own application.

You can obtain application forms from the following places:

Bremen – Old Town Hall – Germany
  • The city / town council
  • The local authority
  • The regional district office
  • The local immigration office or authority for your town or community
  • Youth migration services
  • The immigration advice service for adult migrants

To find out which authority handles the citizenship process in your area, ask your local advice office, regional advice office, or local foreign affairs office. The information and documents that are required for your specific case, will be provided by your local authority.

Take me to the Baltic Sea in Geeeeermany!
51 reasons to go to the seaside. In Germany! ©Usedom Tourismus GmbH

If you are applying for German citizenship while in the UK or abroad, you need to seek advice from your local German Embassy, German Consulate, or German Diplomatic Mission.

Before submitting your application, you should schedule an appointment for a free-of-charge advice session with your local authority office, so that you can ask any questions necessary, make sure that your documentation is complete, and also pay the Naturalisation Application fee.

Sonderzug nach Pankow – the cult song of my Regional District Office in East Germany – sung by Udo Lindenberg!

I scheduled my advice session at my Regional District Office.

I live in Berlin.

Berlin is the capital of Germany.

It’s a very busy important city.

  • The only way to schedule a meeting is by online appointment only – nur nach Terminvereinbarungvia the electronic appointment scheduling system

You won’t get it any other way.

  • And you must be a resident of the district
Light the way to German citizenship!

My Naturalisation Office would only take appointments on two (2) days of the week, and so the next available appointment slot would usually be about 5 weeks ahead, and even then, you really had to be snappy with your fingers, ‘cos if you weren’t fast enough, that would be another week lost!

And right now, that office is so over-whelmed, consultation hours have been cancelled until the middle of February!

Some districts are flexible, and will take applications from anywhere in the city, via open consultation – offene Sprechstunde ohne Terminvereinbarung – but right now, many offices have enough worries of their own!

Oh, and don’t forget to take along your current passport!

Don’t forget to take your British passport!
©dpa- A. Rain

Once the local authority office is satisfied that you fit the requirements for Naturalisation or Double Nationality, you might also be asked to provide evidence of the following:

  • A sufficient knowledge of German, which is at least equal to the level of B1, in the Common European Framework of Reference

If you have a Deutsche Sprachdiplom, a B1 Zertifikat Deutsch, a Deutsch-Test für Zuwanderer (DTZ) – German Test for Immigrants, were educated at a German High School, a German University, or a German institution of Higher Learning, you will not be required to do anything more than show proof.

If not, you might be asked to do a language test.

You can do that test, or find your German language ability, here.

  • General knowledge skills regarding the political, social and legal aspects of living in Germany. Proof of that is usually derived by taking and passing, the Naturalisation Test.

WHAT IS THE NATURALISATION TEST?

Should you go to Oktoberfest!
©Adam Fletcher – How to be German

The Naturalisation Test is proof that you have the knowledge of the legal, social system, and living conditions in Germany that you need, to understand, successfully integrate, and be Naturalised, in Germany.

HOW TO PREPARE:

Oh no! I’ve got to do the Naturalisation Test, & learn stuff!

The best way to prepare for the Naturalisation Test is by using the government’s Online Test Centre.

The Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) has more information about the test including how to prepare, free online tests, and where to take it.

There are many platforms that you can use to practice online.

I used this Einbürgerungstest online platform – which is totally free of charge – because not only did it provide the test from each Bundesland, but it also gives you the possibility to test yourself from Easy to Very Hard, and if you get them wrong, you’d be provided with the correct answer, and why!

Ha! Ha! Ha!

I started with Very Hard (obviously), and got all the answers right, but struggled with all the simple easy questions, so it was good practice!

WHAT DOES THE GERMAN NATURALISATION TEST CONSIST OF?

  • You have one hour to answer 33 multiple choice questions, and you have to get at least 17 questions correct, to pass the test (you have the right to re-sit it, if you don’t)
  • Topics covered include: ‘Living in a Democracy,’ ‘History and Responsibility,’ ‘People in Society,’ as well as some specific questions about the particular State / Region in which you live. In my case, Berlin
  • The local Naturalisation Office in your area, will tell you where your nearest test centre, is so you can register.

Again, it’s a bit of a long process and requires hours of queuing to register.

HOW TO REGISTER: 

I allocated an afternoon to do this.

After waiting for hours, I approached an officer, who told me to go around the corner, and register with another office that had absolutely no one in it!

I was the only person there, and within 5 minutes, filled in the required form, paid the fee, and received a choice of dates.

Victoria’s Einbürgerungstest / Naturalisation Test 2016
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner

I registered and sat my test at the Kultur- und Bildungszentrum Sebastian Haffner in Berlin.

I answered 30 questions correctly out of 33, so I was very pleased!

  • The cost of the test is a €25.00 fixed fee
  • It takes a couple of weeks, then if you pass, you’ll receive your certificate with the test results, from the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, by post.

Once you have the Einbürgerungstest – Naturalisation Test Certificate, you then send a copy of it (do NOT send the original document, as they can’t send it back) to the Naturalisation Office, you applied to.

WHAT NEXT?

Make it crystal clear that you’re applying for Double Nationality, so that you don’t have to give up your British passport, & there’s no misunderstanding later on! ©Lifehack Quotes

Referring back to your original advice session at the very beginning of your application:

Remember to make it crystal clear that you’re applying for Double Nationality rather than full Naturalisation, so that you don’t have to give up your British passport, and there’s no misunderstanding later on!

Then pay the fee.

Pay the fee with the Bürgeramt Kassenkarte!
Erfurt Bürgeramt ©Friedhelm Funke – Instagram – @friedhelm_funke
  • The process of Naturalisation costs €255, but you’ll be required to pay €191 at the initial stage.
  • Minors who apply with their parents, pay a fee of just €51.00
  • A reduced fee, or payment by installment, is available for low-income earners, or applicants with large families

Remember!

Once you have the Einbürgerungstest – Naturalisation Test Certificate, send a copy of it (do NOT send the original document, as they can’t send it back) to the Naturalisation Office, you applied to.

Then you wait.

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week:
Come to Berlin. We’re waiting for ya!

The average process time takes between 6 months and a year, depending on where you live, and the number of applications.

British citizens applying for German citizenship, have increased tenfold!

My advice is to stay in touch with your Naturalisation Office, and give them a quick call every 3 to 6 months, just so that you know how far they’ve got, and if they need anything else.

I bet you wouldn’t mind calling this sexy hot German guy!

They really don’t have the time or resources to contact YOU, so make sure that you do everything you can to make their work easier, as in my Regional District Office, only two (2) officers were allocated to Naturalisation and Citizenship, and it’s such a huge task, it’s over-whelming!

Once you get the lucky letter that your application is accepted for Double Nationality, this is what happens next.

YOU’RE ALMOST THERE! 

At the entrance of my local town council – Bürgeramt Berlin Prenzlauer Berg
©Kai-Uwe Heinrich

You’ll receive a letter with the appointed time and date, when German Naturalisation will be conferred upon you.

On getting to the Naturalisation Office, you’ll be required to bring your current passport, one (1) biometric passport photo, and to pay the remaining €64.00 Application Fee, at a special automated machine.

You’ll also have to sign a few more documents, and get your passport photo verified, and stamped.

There will then be a small pledge ceremony.

I was looking forward to a proper Swearing-In Ceremony like the German Naturalisation – Einbürgerungs Ceremony in Stadt Karlsruhe! ©Fränkle

I was extremely excited and very much looking forward to a fanfare ceremony akin to this one.

My husband – The Music Producer – told me to not to expect drums and whistles in Berlin, and sadly due to a lack of personnel, he was right!

Mind you, I signed a petition asking for a proper Swearing-in Ceremony, sometime in the future!

I’m proud to be a German, so I want my bells and whistles!

At least, I got a tiny Naturalisation/ Einbürgerungs pledge ceremony by the time I got outside the Bezirksamt Pankow von Berlin Town Hall!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – Berlin – The British Berliner

At least, I got a pledge ceremony, in which I had to cite my allegiance and loyalty to the Federal Republic of Germany, and tried not to stumble over my words!

My German Nationality Certificate / Einbürgerungsurkunde, was given to me, and my German Permanent Residency Document taken back, (I received this 5 years after I arrived in Germany, and it was always in my passport…) and returned to the Foreign Office!

We shook hands, then I went to collect my new passport, and pop the champagne!

Popping champagne ‘cos Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner, is German now too!

Whooooooa!

Not so fast Missy!

I was given a waiting number and sent to another department!

More waiting, and a Warteticket / waiting ticket at the Burgeramt in Stadt Neuss!
Instagram – ©Jascha Huschauer – @huschauer

We waited for about 30 minutes, and then went to another office in which I had to:

  • Show my current passport
  • Show my Naturalisation Certificate
  • Show my verified and stamped biometric passport photo
  • Scan a fingerprint of my index finger. On both hands!
This is also the time to apply for a German I.D. card / Personalausweis, too!
©picture alliance / dpa

This is also the time to apply for a German I.D. card / Personalausweis, too because as a British citizen, I only ever had a passport as a legal form of identification, which I was always supposed to take out with me.

And which I never did!

Whoops!

Now I’ll be able to have a German Personalausweis too.

After all that hard work, here's a biometric German / Deutsch passport / Reisepass document for ya!
After all that hard work, here’s a biometric German / Deutsch passport / Reisepass document for ya!
  • The cost of the actual German passport is €60.00
  • The cost of a German passport for anyone under 24 years old is €37.50
  • A German I.D. card / Personalausweis can only be issued to children 16 years and above. For young people under the age of 24, the cost is €22.80
  • For adults over 24, the cost of a German I.D. card / Personalausweis is €28.80

I applied for a German I.D. card / Personalausweis, for both myself, and The Tall Young Gentleman, who will be 16 this year.

He will be pleased.

Gulp!

Very proud. I’ve got my Naturalisation / EinbürgerungsurkundeCertificate & thus Double Nationality!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – Berlin – The British Berliner

So there you have it.

I’m a real British – German now!

Book your hotel here!

SOME VERY IMPORTANT FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ)

If you want to be a German, ask more questions! How to be a German – 10 ways to do it!

CAN I GET GERMAN CITIZENSHIP, WITHOUT NATURALISATION?

In Stellshagen – Mecklenburg-Vorpommern – Germany.
Our son as a baby – 20 months old!

Yes!

  • You can obtain German citizenship by right of blood or Jus Sanguinis in which you have at least one German parent. It doesn’t matter whether you were born in Germany or not
  • You can get German citizenship by descent, if your parents registered you at the German Embassy or Consulate, in the country you were born in
  • You can get German citizenship by descent, if you were adopted by German citizens, as a child under 18
  • You and your descendents can get German citizenship by descent if you, your parents / grandparents, were German Jews between January 30, 1933 and May 8, 1945, and were deprived of citizenship on political, racial, or religious grounds
  • You can get German citizenship by descent if you’re a spouse or descendant of an ethnic German from the former USSR, or certain parts of Eastern Europe, who previously had German citizenship, and were expelled and deprived of citizenship on political, racial, or religious grounds
  • You can get German citizenship by descent, if you’re a British citizen, and you are a descendant of German Jews who would have been German citizens by birth, but were deprived of citizenship on political, racial, or religious grounds, during World War II
  • You don’t qualify if you were born in a foreign country, and your German parents were also born in a foreign country, after January 1st, 2000
  • Outside of the points above, you don’t qualify for German citizenship through any other ancestor, except your parents

IF I WANT GERMAN CITIZENSHIP, DO I HAVE TO GIVE UP MY FORMER NATIONALITY?

Exit vom Brexit – Wir sind die neuen Germans! / Exit from Brexit. We are the new Germans!
British Berliner BAMS I – ©Axel Springer

Sorry! Under normal circumstances, you do!

However, you can keep your birth nationality, if:

  • You’re a member of the EEA, a Swiss citizen, or the EU
  • You have double nationality

DOES MARRIAGE ENTITLE ME TO GERMAN CITIZENSHIP?

A lovely wedding at Bluecoat Chambers
© 2017 Samuel Docker

Nope!

It certainly helps of course, and once married to a German national, the spouse is usually entitled to a residence permit. However, the legal stance is that if you want German citizenship, you’ll have to:

  • Meet some of the criteria I discussed previously
  • Be married for at least two years
  • Be resident in Germany for at least 3 years
  • Depending on your original citizenship, you can apply for naturalisation later on…

ARE CHILDREN BORN IN GERMANY, AUTOMATICALLY GERMAN?

Children born on German soil to non-German parents – on or after January 1st 2000 – can have German citizenship too.

I’m afraid not.

  • Of course, children born to at least one German parent, even outside the country, are eligible for German citizenship
  • However, children born on German soil to non-German parents, on or after January 1st 2000, can only obtain German citizenship under certain circumstances
  • At least one parent must have permanent right of residency, and have lived in the country regularly and legally, for at least eight years
  • In some cases, children born on German soil to non-German parents, can acquire German citizenship by right of birth in Germany, through Naturalisation, or via Dual Nationality. However, between the ages of 18 and 23, they must decide which nationality to keep, if they have more than one

IS IT POSSIBLE NOT TO TAKE THE NATURALISATION TEST?

At the Humbldt-Universität zu Berlin, and with our British flag!

Yes, it’s possible if:

  • You’re under 16
  • You went to a German High School, or a University in Germany
  • You are unable to meet the testing requirements due to age, disability, or illness

HOW EASY IS IT TO GET GERMAN CITIZENSHIP?

After a hard day at the Berlinale, surely I deserve a glass of champagne!

Ha! Ha!

For a newbie, Germany is one of the most difficult countries to move to, on a long-term basis.

  • If you’re just arriving, it isn’t easy
  • If you’ve been here for at least 3 – 5 years, you’ll know how difficult it really is
  • If you hold a permanent residence permit at the time of application, your legal place of residence has been Germany for at least eight years, (seven if you’ve attended an integration course, or six in special integration circumstances), speak “good” German, have a reliable income, can support yourself and your dependents, and are a British citizen, apply now!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner

Yep!

The British Berliner will be a British – German not just in name, but on paper too.

I’m still British of course, but I’m German too.

And why?

Because I deserve it!

Hurrah!

How to get German citizenship if you’re British – How to be a German via Double Nationality! ©dpa/G. Fischer

For support and advice please contact the following organisations:

HOW TO GET GERMAN CITIZENSHIP IF YOU’RE BRITISH – HOW TO BE A GERMAN VIA DOUBLE NATIONALITY!

We’re not leaving!

This article is not sponsored, and I’m delighted to be a British German!

See you next week!

Be German. Drink up at Oktoberfest! ©dapd

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links, I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

How to get German citizenship if you’re British – How to be a German via Double Nationality!
How to get German citizenship if you’re British – How to be a German via Double Nationality!

Do you want to be a German citizen? Are you British? Are you looking to change nationalities because of Brexit? Have you applied for Double Nationality / Dual Citizenship, or are you going the whole hog? How has Brexit affected you as a British person living in the EU? Was this article useful? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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Food in Germany: 5 of the Best Ever!

Food in Germany: 5 of the Best Ever!

Hello Everyone!

Did you over-stuff your belly with Christmas Day delights?

Did you manage to get through the Christmas festivity without shouting, screaming, or bursting into tears?

Jolly Good!

A portrait of Christmas taken from our garden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner

I love writing about food!

I consider myself a respectable foodie.

But most importantly, I like writing about countries and regions that have been overlooked such as the following:

A traditional Sunday lunch anywhere in Britain!
©Time Out London Food & Drink
Hungarian stew
Polish fishermen on the Polish Baltic Sea who did fabulously well!
A delicious mug of cold beer in Ljubljana – Slovenia!
Me drinking bubble tea in Taiwan!
A 5 minute guide to German food. On the Baltic Sea beach!

Yay!

Book your hotel here!

CHRISTMAS MARKET TRADITIONS

Beer in Germany isn’t a joke.
How to be a German – 10 ways to do it!

As we’re a British-German family, we mix our traditions in order to make our lifestyle as British and German as possible!

One of those traditions is eating out, and going to a Christmas Market!

The Christmas Market in Germany, isn’t just any old market.

Nordic Angels at the Lucia Weihnachtsmarkt im Hof der Kulturbrauerei or the Lucia Christmas Market in the hip and trendy courtyard of the Kulturbrauerei in Prenzlauerberg!
© Jochen Loch

Oh dear me no!

The German Christmas Market is a way in which people can socialize with their friends, hang out, and just have a fine old time.

The German Christmas Market is a way in which we can socialise with our American friends in Berlin!

The Christmas Markets isn’t Disneyland or some sort of recreational park, it’s a German tradition of browsing at skilled crafts, shopping, eating traditional German Christmas streetfood, and drinking to the heath of one and all, with hot mulled wine, otherwise known as Glühwein.

And for those with a far stronger alcoholic tendency than my own, trying out the “Feuerzangenbowle.”

Trying out the Feuerzangenbowle. Again!
Trying out the Feuerzangenbowle. Again!

It can reduce a grown man to tears if care is not taken…!

Ouch!

Book your hotel here!

FOOD IN GERMANY: 5 OF THE BEST EVER!

Best of Berlin – 4 years and counting!
An Affair with Chocolate – ©Sarah Robinson

When people think of German food, you can’t blame them when their impressions tend to lay on the stodgy side of things.

I mean, when you think about it, German food doesn’t sound exciting!

Just greasy!

However living in Germany has shown me that yes, German food does lie a little on the heavy side, since it was originally designed for working class peasants, but you know, the modern-day German isn’t a peasant anymore!

Well, not all of them…

One of Germany’s best – Roast goose, home-made dumplings, gravy & red cabbage!

So you can get lovely food such as roast goose, home-made dumplings, home-made gravy, and red cabbage!

Yum-my!

In fact most Germans are intelligent, tolerant, internationally minded, and open to different life experiences, and that is reflected in the food.

In fact, in Berlin where I live, you’d be hard-pressed to find “real” German food!

A most delicious Bosso Spätzle! How to eat cheaply in Luxembourg!
A most delicious Bosso Spätzle!
How to eat cheaply in Luxembourg!

Austrian food. Yes.

Berlin food. Oh yes!

But German food. Eeeh! Umm!

Not quite.

“Typical” German food has a hard, long reputation of being rather stodgy and boring.

Pretty much like British food actually!

So let’s see what we can find.

Shall we get started?

1.  THE NUMBER ONE FOOD ITEM IS THE SAUSAGE!

Best German meals to try out in Berlin – Currywurst!

The very highlight of a typical German day is the sausage.

All hail the almighty S!

Germany has loads of different sausages and each comes with its own unique taste.

White sausages. I've tried it every which way, but I still don't like it! ©TakeAway - Wikipedia
White sausages. I’ve tried it every which way, but I still don’t like it!
©TakeAway – Wikipedia

I find the white sausage with sweet mustard or Weißwürst quite disgusting personally, even though I’ve tried it every which way.

Ah well!

A perfectly acceptable pork grilled sausage or bratwurst!

The grilled pork sausages with mustard, ketchup or both, otherwise known as Bratwurst can be decisively delicious.

My favourite German sausage however, is the currywurst.

The currywurst is Berlin’s most famous sausage.

Currywurst and chips slathered with tomato ketchup, curry powder, and sometimes mayo!
Currywurst and chips slathered with tomato ketchup, curry powder, and sometimes mayo!

Currywurst!

Currywurst is beef or pork sausage grilled and chopped up, then smothered with a spicy ketchup and curry powder. It’s eaten with a pile of chips and a slice of bread or a bun.

It’s such a famous icon that it even has its own Currywurst Museum where you can learn how currywurst is made, smell it, watch a film about it, attempt to sell it, and play around with the french fries and chips.

You can sometimes even have chocolate and curry ice-cream!

Berlin's most famous iconic meal - currywurst, chips & mayo!
Berlin’s most famous iconic meal – currywurst, chips & mayo!

Currywurst can usually only be found in Berlin everywhere you look.

My two favourite places however, are the 1930’s East Berlin historical establishment called Konnopke’s Imbiß in my own area of Prenzlauerberg, and the 1980’s West Berlin trendy establishment Curry 36, in my old neighbourhood of Kreuzberg!

p.s. They speak English in both places, so no worries if you don’t speak German!

Book your hotel here!

2.  THE MOST EXQUISITE VEGETABLE IS THE ASPARAGUS!

I needed to know what we doing, so that we wouldn’t get poisoned with mushrooms and die!!

Eek!

It’s true you know, so let’s talk vegetables!

The thing that Germans all rave about is…

Wait for it…

Asparagus!!!
Asparagus!!!

Asparagus!

I know!!

White asparagus, otherwise known as Spargel!
White asparagus, otherwise known as Spargel!

Asparagus, especially white asparagus, otherwise known as Spargel, is a popular summer dish especially in season.

It’s a pretty short season of just two (2) months, so we all run around, looking for the nearest farmers market, so that you can get can the freshest produce possible.

Luckily for us, we have two (2) farmers markets in my neighbourhood, and one of them is less than one (1) minute away from my house!

Book your hotel here!

3.  THE MOST RECOGNISABLE, BUT STILL TASTES WEIRD, IS THE GERMAN MEATBALL!

Are they burgers. Or meatballs!

Eek!

Some might even go as far as to call them burgers!

In Germany, they’re called all types of different things.

In Berlin, these German meatballs are huge pan-fried minced balls of beef, pork, or lamb and are known as Boulette.

In fact, so much so, that when I first came to Germany, I didn’t know what they were, so I didn’t eat ’em! Imagine my shock when I discovered that they were actually meatballs!

I wasted two years not eating them!!

A Berlin lunch of Frikadellen, Fleischkühle, Fleischpflanzerl or Königsberger Klopse!
A Berlin lunch of Frikadellen, Fleischkühle, Fleischpflanzerl or Königsberger Klopse!

In other parts of Germany they are smaller and known as Frikadellen, Fleischkühle, Fleischpflanzerl or Königsberger Klopse!

They are not normally eaten with a tomato sauce, but with bread! As you can see above, these meatballs are small, topped with apple mousse, accompanied by sliced brown bread sprinkled over with tomato, salmon, and mustard & cress, or sliced brown bread topped with cream cheese, sliced radishes, with more mustard & cress.

In fact they were quite delightful, so I scoffed the lot!

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4.  THE BEST GERMAN TREAT IS THE SCHNITZEL!

Schnitzel. Simply one of the best!

I’m sure you heard of schnitzel!

Schnitzel is a variety of meat such as veal, mutton, chicken, beef, turkey, reindeer, or pork that is lightly pounded flat with a rolling pin, until it’s quite thin!

The meat is then rolled in flour, whipped eggs, and bread crumbs and pan-fried!

But let me tell you a secret.

Wiener Schnitzel – A traditional-Germanic dish served in Austria and Bavaria!
©Stuart Forster / Getty Images

The best type of schnitzel to have is not actually the German variety, but the Austrian Viennese veal cutlet, otherwise known as Wiener Schnitzel!

You can usually tell which is which as Wiener Schnitzel is made only from veal, and the others could be made out of anything at all!

It’s usually served with a garnish of sliced lemons, boiled potatoes, chips, potato salad, a sprinkling of parsley, berries, and some sort of side salad.

Either way, it’s always a treat, and quite delicious.

Oh yeah!

Yum!

Book your hotel here!

5. THE MOST POPULAR CREAMY DESSERT IS THE BLACK FOREST GÂTEAU!

Yummy Black Forest Gâteau!
©2017 Prima – Hearst Magazines

Scrummy desserts can be found all over Germany, Austria and Switzerland, as the cake shops are lovely.

One of the most famous, and certainly most recognisable, is the Black Forest Gâteau, otherwise known as Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte!

Black Forest Gâteau or Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte!

The Black Forest Gâteau is a very rich chocolate layered sponge cake, with a cherry and whipped cream filling, strawberry jam, double cream, and decorated with more whipped cream, dark red or black cherries, and grated chocolate shavings or curls!

The cherries can either be sweet or sour.

In Germany, a Black Forest Gâteau is traditionally filled with sour cherry fruit brandy, otherwise known as kirschwasser, some other sort of spirit.

Or a good dollop of rum!

The traditional costume of the women of the Black Forest region, with a hat with huge, red pom-poms on top – Bollenhut!
©Michel Lefrancq

In fact, without the brandy or kirschwasser, the cake cannot be labelled as either a Black Forest Gâteau or a Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte!

Hic!

That’s it from me.

See you next year!

Book your hotel here!

FOOD IN GERMANY: 5 OF THE BEST EVER!

Food in Germany: 5 of the Best Ever!

This article isn’t sponsored and all opinions and most delicious food items, are my very own!

I have so much to share with you.

I went on a press trip to Hamburg. Watch out for the details!

I’ll be continuing my last visit to the UK next year!

In January, I’ll be visiting Belgium!

I’ll be at the British Shorts Film Festival taking place between 11th – 17th January, 2018. If you’re an aspiring film-maker submission is free of charge, so hurry!

I’ll be at Berlin Fashion Week taking place between 16th – 18th January, 2018

I’ll be at the 33rd British Council Literature Seminar – #BritLitBerlin taking place between 25th – 27th January, 2018. If you want to attend or join in, registration is now open!

Save the Date!

I’ll be there. Will you?

If you’re not in Berlin next year, no champagne for you!

January is going to be exciting!

Have a great festive season, and a stunning New Year!

Food in Germany: 5 of the Best Ever!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links, I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

Food in Germany 5 of the Best Ever!

Do you like German food? Do you think these items are the 5 best food items in Germany, or have I forgotten something? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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