A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Food!

Ha!

‘Got your attention didn’t I?!

But seriously, isn’t food a wonderful thing.

Especially German food!

Umm!

Alright then.

Some German food.

Ah.

That’s better!

Food in Germany: 5 of the Best Ever!

So I’ve been writing about Dresden the last few weeks ‘cos of the new job n’ all that. And because I want to provide a resource for those of you thinking of visiting Dresden!

And why not. Oy!

If you’re just coming to The British Berliner for the very first, or forgot about all the previous stuff I wrote on German food, here’s a reminder:

Best German meals to try out in Berlin – Currywurst!

Yum!

WHAT IS SAXON or SÄCHSISCHE FOOD?

A mixed platter of chicken with vegetables & a fried egg on top!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Saxon food is traditional food that stems from Germany!

And yes, it’s stodge by any other name!

Now mind you, when I say Saxon, I’m not referring to the original Anglo-Saxon homeland otherwise known as Old Saxony, but nowadays known as Lower Saxony, or even that of Upper Saxony otherwise known as Obersachsen!

But I’m referring to the Free State of Saxony, otherwise known as Freistaat Sachsen, or simply, Saxony!

All rather confusing!!

Having said that most of their food is pretty similar!

Saxon cuisine is quite hearty and tends to lean towards a lot of beef, potatoes, dumplings, seafood, heavy sauces, bread, a sort of soft-cheese cake, and beer!

I don’t claim to be an expert by any means, so I’ll just show you what we ate and drank, and where to get them!

Be German. Drink up at Oktoberfest!
©dapd
How to get German citizenship if you’re British – How to be a German via Double Nationality!
AUGUSTINER AN DER FRAUENKIRCHE DRESDEN
An der Frauenkirche 16/17
01067 Dresden

The first place we went to  was a restaurant called Augustiner An der Frauenkirche.

It’s enormously famous and isn’t even Saxon but Bavarian! Having said that, the food and drink was most delicious, so I’m putting it in anyway!

You can actually order traditional Saxon food too, and the location is excellent, the service was top, everyone’s dressed in traditional Bavarian costume, and it’s mere steps away from the Frauenkirche

It’s really nice, but very, very popular so either go really early, quite late, or reserve a seat!

Bavarian Leberkäse (liver cheese meat loaf) Burger at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Obviously, the Bavarian Leberkäse (liver cheese meat loaf) Burger was delish!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman really enjoyed his Bavarian Leberkäse (a sort of liver-cheese-meatloaf) Burger, served with a pretzel roll, sweet mustard, chips / french fries, and a tiny side salad!

Cost – €11.90

Bavarian stuff – Pork Roast in Augustiner beer sauce & dumplings at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Bavarian Coleslaw at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I had the Pork Roast in Augustiner beer sauce with herby bread dumpling, and Bavarian coleslaw with bacon bits!

Cost – €11.90

We all had locally brewed beer at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Drink beer at the traditional Saxon / Bavarian Augustiner restaurant in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We all had the locally brewed Saxon / Bavarian beer at the Augustiner An der Frauenkirche Dresden. It was very nice too!

Cost – €4.20

OMG!

We had more stuff, but it was quite late (?!!), and the photograph was blurry, so I haven’t included them!

Believe me when I say that sometimes, you just have to put aside your values about being a vegetarian or vegan, and just go ahead, and eat meat!

Brunch at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
CAFÉ MILCHMÄDCHEN
Grunaer Str.27
01069 Dresden

We went to the Café Milchmädchen for brunch on Saturday morning. And what a brunch it was!

The Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück consisting of 2 buns, butter, salmon, shrimp-cocktail, is a really nice hangout in the AltStadt / Old Town and right opposite the German Hygiene Museum, otherwise known as the Deutsches Hygiene-Museum!

I mentioned this a few weeks ago, as one of the museums that you ought to visit, and I still stand by it!

Scrambled eggs at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We really had a most enjoyable brunch and went all out to order scrambled eggs as well as a breakfast platter!

Cost – €2.40 – €2.90

Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman and I had the Fisherman’s Kutterfrühstück consisting of 2 buns, butter, salmon, shrimp-cocktail, mustard and dill sauce, and a garnish of “light” vegetables, fresh herbs and exotic fruit.

Cost – €10.90

Gourmet Käsefrühstück at Café Milchmädchen in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Meanwhile, The Music Producer had the three-tier Gourmet Käsefrühstück affair – consisting of 2 buns , butter, clotted cream,  and assortment of cheese, cocktail tomato, mozzarella balls, raspberries, lingonberries, kiwis, orange slices, and a garnish of vegetables, fresh herbs and exotic fruit!

Cost – €9.70

And while we’re at it, let’s have some organic beer from Hamburg. In Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

And while we’re at it, let’s have some organic beer from Hamburg, sourced at the Café Milchmädchen in Dresden!

Cost – €2.90

Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
RADEBERGER SPEZIALAUSSHANK
Terrassenufer 1
01067 Dresden

By the time we found the Radeberger Spezialausshank, we were parched!

Dresden has been boiling in the last few weeks, and that weekend was no exception. Funny how in April, we’re all burning to a crisp and by “summer,” we’ll probably all be freezing!

This historic building is famous for Dresden’s very own beer produced in 1872 – the Radeberger Pils (pale lager) and the Radeberger Zwickelbier (unfiltered beer straight from the barrel)!

In 1905, Radeberger was the favourite drink of King Friedrich August III of Saxony, as well as the first Chancellor of Germany – Otto von Bismarck in 1887 – who both gave the beer a special license and acceptance. Is it any wonder that Radeberger is still exported today and is Germany’s 9th most popular beer!

To get there, you just need to go to the Brühlsche Terrace and go down the steps of a garden & beach parasol unit. It looks a little dodgy from the distance, but once you go down the stairs, it’s a pleasant surprise to see a lovely terrace with a fantastic view of the city and directly facing the River Elbe!

You can go up the stairs from street level too!

We were thirsty, so only had beers!

Radeberger Pils at Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Excellent views & my Radeberger Pils at Radeberger Spezialausshank in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Cost – I can’t remember exactly, but it couldn’t have been more than €3.00!

Prost!

Having a nice time at Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
BIERGARTEN ELBSEGLER – THE PLACE TO BE
Große Meißner Str.15
01097 Dresden

What a lovely place this biergarten is!

The Biergarten Elbsegler actually belongs to the Westin Bellevue Dresden Hotel, and is unique in that on one side, you have the River Elbe right in front of you, and on the other side of the biergarten, you have the views of the AltStadt / Old Town.

In fact, quite a few people were playing frisbee nearby, as well as listening to music, picnicking, frolicking, or just lounging in the early evening sunshine.

It was very nice.

The Thüringer Rostbratwurst sausage at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We were a bit peckish by this time, but not hungry enough to have a “proper” meal, so opted for a famous East German snack – the Thüringer Rostbratwurst or Thüringer grilled sausage, complete with mayonnaise, mustard, and tomato ketchup!

Cost – €3.90 – €5.90

The Tall Young Gentleman & his currywurst at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Yep! A man & his currywurst can’t be parted at the Biergarten Elbsegler in Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Of course, being the Berliners that we are, nothing stopped us from having their version of a currywurst. It will never be the same as the original one, but it would do!

Cost – €3.50

And then we had the Radeberger Pils (lager beer) at the Biergarten Elbsegler Dresden!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Oh, and some more Dresden Radeberger beer too.

Why not!

Cost – €3.90

Frederick Augustus II of Saxony or Augustus II the Strong – the Golden Rider!
WATZKE AM GOLDENEN REITER
Hauptstraße 1
01097 Dresden

We had dinner at the rather rustic Watzke am Goldenen Reiter or the Watzke on the Golden Rider!

It’s a branch of another famous historical restaurant and brewery – the Ball & Brauhaus Watze – which is an 1838 establishment with 3 restaurants!

We weren’t all that impressed with the food, but the location is, excuse my pun, gold, as right outside the restaurant is a very golden statue of Frederick Augustus II of Saxony or Augustus II the Strong – the Golden Rider, dressed as a Roman Caesar, riding a horse, covered in gold leaf!

The restaurant also has a huge St. John’s (as in John the Baptist!) bell which is rung on the hour, in synergy with the bells across the road, in the tower of the Frauenkirche!

Pork served with sauerkraut & plums at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Knuckle of pork, sauerkraut & dumplings at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Music Producer had crispy knuckle of pork served with sauerkraut, plums, red onions, cabbage, potato dumplings, and gravy.

Cost – €12.90

Roast chicken, potato wedges, cream & mango-chili-dip at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Chicken, potato wedges & mango-chili-dip at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman had half of a roast chicken served with potato wedges, with herby sour cream & mango-chili-dip!

Cost – €8.50

A mixed platter of chicken with vegetables & a fried egg on top!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I had the mixed platter of chicken (I think!) with potato wedges, vegetables, gravy, & a fried egg on top, but sadly, I didn’t like it as it was lukewarm, and tasted like nothing at all!

Cost – €12.00 – €15.00

Watzke Pils & Watzke unfiltered beer at Watzke am Goldenen Reiter Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

At least the beer was alright, so we washed it all down with Watzke Pils (lager) and Watzke Altpieschner unfiltered beer, brewed on the premises!

Cost – €3.80

Drinks at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
AUSONIA2
Am Neumarkt 1
01097 Dresden

AusoniA2 is an Italian pizzeria that also serves interesting seafood. It’s on the other side of the Frauenkirche.

So let me tell you, this was a Sunday afternoon, and we found it hard to find the “best seat” with views of the Frauenkirche, the film festival that was going on at the time, and just basically, a place to do great people-watching! It took a while to find a “non-sharing” table for three (3), ‘cos this is Germany, so nobody shares tables!

Ladies dressed in baroque attires – Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We got it in the end, complete with great views – locals dressed in baroque attire. Mind you, as in New York and LA, they do expect a tip, if you want to take photographs!

The pizza prices are a little hefty, but the view makes it worth your while!

Pizza at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

We had the Pizza Ausonia which consisted of tomato, mozzarella, goats cheese, pepperoni, spicy salami, and olives, which I asked them to remove…

Cost – I can’t remember exactly, but it was somewhere along the lines of €10.00 – €15.00

Wernesgrüner Pils beer from Saxony at AusoniA2 Italian pizzeria in Dresden ©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The beers were alright, and a different brand this time – Wernesgrüner beer from Saxony!

The Wernesgrüner Pils was founded in 1436 and is even older than the Radeberger Pils! It’s known as the”Pils Legend,” because it was a bitter specialty during the communist period in East Germany.

Wernesgrüner Pils was originally a family-owned company until 2002, when it was bought by the Bitburger Brewery Group.

It’s not my favourite beer as it tends towards the side of bitterness, but if you’re into “bitters,” this is the brand I’d recommend.

Cost – €3.50

The Kurfürstenschänke historical restaurant and guest house in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
KURFÜRSTENSCHÄNKE – HISTORICAL RESTAURANT AND GUESTHOUSE
An der Frauenkirche 13
01067 Dresden

The Kurfürstenschänke is a marvellous historical restaurant and guest house, so we decided to end our Dresden family weekend right there! 

The restaurant is a beautiful 1708 property with charming baroque architecture, high ceilings, and elegant seating, and just seconds away from the Frauenkirche!

It also serves  Saxon / Bohemian dishes, exquisite gourmet meals, as well as hearty rustic traditional food!

It’s a three level restaurant and surprisingly larger than you would expect, so plenty of seats. We preferred to sit on the outdoor terrace as it was such a hot, sweltering day.

Pork steak at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Tall Young Gentleman had marinated bone roasted pork steak in beer mustard sauce, roasted onions, roasted bacon strips,with potato and cucumber-dilled salad!

Cost – €12.50

Ox cheek at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

The Music Producer had Ox cheek in gravy, herb curd dumplings, and grilled vegetables with ramson oil!

Cost – €13.90

The cold cuts & chesse platter at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018
Fürstenbrot / Aristocratic bread at the Kurfürstenschänke in Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

I was already pretty stuffed so opted not to have a “real meal” but a platter of Ratsherrenplatte which consisted of Leberkäse – a type of “liver-cheese” bread loaf, Thuringian red sausage, Pfefferbeißer – a dried, smoked, peppery German sausage made in sheep casings, slices of roast pork, Saxon cheese, pickled cucumber, tomatoes, butter, a side salad, and Fürstenbrot or Prince (aristocratic) bread!

Cost – €10.90

Champagne at the Kurfürstenschänke historical restaurant and guest house Dresden
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

Needless to say, the best way to end a splendid weekend is with a sparkling glass of champagne.

What say you?

Cost – €4.20

Other Saxon dishes are:

  • The Dresdner Eierschecke – A type of layered cake made from yeast dough topped with apple, quark (curds), poppy seeds and covered with a glaze of egg, sugar, flour and cream!
  • Quarkkeulchen –  A type of cream-cheese ball made from cream cheese, eggs flour, mashed potatoes, and spiced with cinnamon or raisins!
  • Kalter Hund or Cold Dog – A type of square-shape chocolate cake made into hedgehog slices of chocolate, crushed biscuit, rice crispies, and with a topping of chocolate icing sprinkled with items such as coconuts, hundreds and thousands, and other toppings
  • Wickelkloß – A type of potato dumpling spread with butter, and sprinkled with breadcrumbs!
Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen – German Gingerbread!
  • Pulsnitzer Pfefferkuchen – A type of traditional gingerbread made from chocolate and honey
  • Sächsischer Sauerbraten – A German pot roast marinated in vinegar, water, herbs, spices, and seasonings, served with red cabbage, dumplings, potatoes or Spätzle (Schwabian pasta), and made from  beef, venison, lamb, mutton, pork, or horse meat!
  • Radeberger Biergulasch – A type of goulash cooked in Radeberger Pils beer!
The Dresdner Stollen
  • And of course, Dresden’s most important Saxon item – The Dresdner Stollen – A type of rectangular-shaped fruit cake made from nuts, spices, dried or candied fruit, raisins, almonds, nuts, marzipan, and coated with icing sugar.

The Dresdner Stollen in particular is most beloved, as Dresden is considered to be the home of the original Stollen, as far back as 1474!

Dresden Stollen is produced in the city of Dresden and distinguished by a special seal depicting King Augustus II the Strong. This “official” Stollen is produced by only 150 recognised Dresden bakers!

It’s one of Germany’s most traditional items, is eaten during the Christmas Season, and can usually be found at most Christmas Markets, especially the Dresden one, otherwise known as the Striezelmarkt – one of Germany’s oldest documented Christmas markets ever, founded in 1434!

Yay!

A 5 MINUTE GUIDE TO SAXON FOOD IN DRESDEN. NOW ISN’T THAT JUST CUTE!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!
©Victoria Ade-Genschow – The British Berliner – Dresden – April 2018

This article is not sponsored, and all opinions and all the Saxon food that I noshed and slobbered over, are my very own!

In a few weeks, I’ll be revealing my next summer trip!

Stay tuned.

Yay!

That’s it for now.

See you next week!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

A 5 minute guide to Saxon food in Dresden. Now isn’t that just cute!

Do you like German food? Have you ever heard of Saxony? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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Croatia – a basic guide to food!

How to visit the Balkans: Introducing Croatia – the dream of Game of Thrones!

And so it’s here!

The last post that I’ll be writing about Croatia.

For now!

But what a most important post!

It goes without saying that my stay in Croatia was a delight. It was my first time to go to the Balkans, but it certainly, won’t be the last. If you’re just tuning in, here’s what you missed:

10 reasons why Zagreb is a family destination – A great place for teenagers!
Game of Thrones – Season 7 – Kristofer Hivju as Tormund Giantsbane & Gwendoline Christie as Brienne of Tarth
©Helen Sloan – HBO

Honestly speaking, most people have never previously heard of Croatia.

Before Game of Thrones!

I’m a great fan of the show and can’t wait to see Series Seven (7).

And Eight (8)!

I know. I’m a freakish nerd!

A traditional Busker in Zagreb – Croatia!

Isn’t Croatia somewhere in Eastern Europe?

Yes.

And No!

It can’t be both surely?

The Music Producer in Split. Geographically, Croatia is one of the previous communist states!

Well, geographically, it’s one of the previous communist states.

Don’t worry.

Breath!

However, in recent years, Croatia has managed to re-invent itself, so that even though it is actually in Eastern Europe, it’s marketed as Central Europe too!

Croatia isn’t crowded in the Spring – Locals in Zagreb – Croatia!

In truth, it has the vibe of the Mediterranean, and you’d be hard pressed not to think that in certain parts of Croatia, you could actually be in Italy, or dare I say it. Austria!

And this is reflected in it’s food!

Book your hotel here!

So let’s get started:

WHAT IS CROATIAN FOOD?

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Croatian food is defined by it’s regions, towns and villages, and has its own distinct culinary tradition rooting back to ancient times!

The best way to experience how a nation really lives, is to go to the market place and sample street food.

I adore street food as it’s ultimately the best way to get to the culture of a nation. I’ve been to many countries, and sampled many a nations’ cuisine, and Croatia was no exception!

The differences in the selection of foodstuffs and forms of cooking are most notable between those on the Croatian mainland, and those in coastal regions.

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Mainland cuisine is characterized by earlier Slavic and neighboring cultures such as Hungarian and Turkish, with the use of pork fat such as lard, and spices such as black pepper, paprika, and garlic, while the coastal regions are influenced by ancient Greek, Roman, and modern-day Mediterranean cuisine, with the use of olive oil, and herbs and spices such as rosemary, sage, bay leaf, and citrus rind.

Rustic traditional food is derived from the former Yugoslavian nations and use the same basic ingredients such as grains, dairy, meat, fish, and vegetables, with similar cooking styles such as stewing, grilling, roasting and baking.

We spent a lot of the time in coastal regions.

Take me to Dubrovnik right away!

Most ingredients used in Croatian food would be:

  • olive oil
  • courgettes
  • cabbage
  • aubergine
  • tomatoes
  • mushrooms
If you’re looking for traditional ingredients, you can get everything you need at a local street market!

Croatia has an abundance of fresh, local, seasonal foodstuff such as olives and honey, joined in recent years by a plethora of health and ecology-conscious food stores selling organic vegetables, pure fruit juices, gluten-free bread and all manner of boutique deli grocery items!

In fact, there’s absolutely no need to visit a supermarket at all!

Take a look below:

CROATIA – A BASIC GUIDE TO FOOD!

Lamb on baby green pea puree - Croatian food is most delicious!
Lamb on baby green pea puree – Croatian food is most delicious!

I could write pages and pages of what Croatian food consists of and how they make it, but instead, I’ll let the pictures do the talking and if you have further insight, let me know in the comment section below!

BRUNCH:

Booking an apartment in Croatia is by far better, than booking a hotel!

We stayed in various apartments which I found courtesy of booking.com. All were pretty huge, centrally located, and cost between €45.00 – €60.00 per nights. As a result, we didn’t really go out for breakfast, but rather for brunch!

You can opt for:

This plate of Cevapcici was certainly pretty cheap. Ho! Ho!
  • Cevapcici – a type of grilled lamb sausage dish traditionally found in many Balkan countries and actually, the national dish of Bosnia,  Herzegovina, and Serbia! It’s usually served on a plate or in flatbread, with raw chopped onions, sour cream, kajmak, ajvar, feta cheese, ground red pepper and salt. The service was slow but the food was quite delicious. Bought at Kitchen & Gruill PLAC – Cost: 39kn or €5.25
  • Soparnika (chard filled pastry)
  • Zrnovo macaroni
  • OMG! Truffles in Štrukli!
A popular traditional Croatian dish composed of dough and stuffed with cheese – Štrukli Truffles in Zagreb – Croatia!

Štrukli is a popular traditional Croatian dish composed of dough and filled with cheese, various types of filling and then cooked or baked. We found ours at a popular place where you can have a wide variety of štrukli, ranging from traditional cheese to blueberry. We had ours with truffles and sat in the very pretty summer garden. Great service. Fantastic food! Bought at La Štruk restaurant in Zagreb. Cost: 35kn or €4.70

  • Quiche
  • Scrambled eggs with prsut, mushrooms and cheese
  • Smoked-salmon platter
An Egg Benedict brunch, at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia!
  • We had brunch at this rather wonderful unique restaurant within one of the Squares of the city walls of Split! In fact, we liked the restaurant so much that we went back twice! The Music Producer & The Tall Young Gentleman both had a meal of Egg Benedict which consisted of poached eggs laid on top of crunchy whole wheat toasted bread, creamy avocado, rocket, tomato and olive oil. Bought at the cute restaurant Bepa! in Split. Cost: 30kn or €4.00
A Croatian-style “English breakfast,” at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia!
  • I had the Croatian-style “English breakfast” of scrambled eggs, crispy bacon, Croatian sausage, grilled tomato, and spicy baked beans! Again, bought at Bepa! above, in Split. Cost: 59kn or €8.00
A “Club Sandwich” beef burger, a fried egg, bacon, lettuce, & tomatoes, served with a portion of chips in a red polka dot mug and a tureen of ketchup!
  • We went back again for lunch and both The Music Producer and The Tall Young Gentleman had burgers. Here’s the “Club Sandwich” which actually consisted of a beef burger, a fried egg, bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes, served with a portion of chips in a red polka dot mug and a fancy tureen of ketchup! Once again bought at Bepa! above, in Split. Cost: 65kn or €8.80
  • Porridge with an array of snazzy toppings
Ham and egg foam pâté with horseradish cream, for Easter brunch, in Dubrovnik – Croatia!

We were invited to a complimentary press Easter brunch, along with journalists from Italy! Our brunch was at a restaurant which was opposite the Gate of the Old City of Dubrovnik.

  • The restaurant serves only Croatian food as a matter of policy, and includes both seafood and meat dishes. We had a three (3) course brunch meal and a separate dessert was made for me ‘cos of my allergies! Our ham and egg foam pâté with horseradish cream was most delicious, and something I had never had before! Eaten at GUSTA ME restaurant in Dubrovnik – press lunch – As part of an Easter brunch three-course menu – retail price – 160kn or €21.00
  • Cololino (Croatian pap)

SNACKS:

Pork sandwiches bought at the street market in Zagreb – Croatia
  • Pork sandwiches made from Istrian and Dalmatian Pršut – dry-cured ham, tucked into thick slabs of fresh crusty bread from Vis! Bought at the Zagreb Street Market on the Ban Jelačić (main) square. Cost: 21.20kn or €2.85
Mmm! Fritule – Croatian doughnuts – are quite yum!
  • Fritule – Croatian doughnuts – can be found everywhere in Croatia. Bought at the Zagreb Street Market on the Ban Jelačić (main) square. Cost: 15 kn or €2.00
A Croatian sandwich made from thick slices of mozzarella and thinly cut Miljevci prosciutto, in Zagreb – Croatia!

A Croatian sandwich made from a bread roll with thick slices of mozzarella and thinly cut Miljevci prosciutto. Bought at the cafe next door to our lovely apartment in Zagreb. Cost: 12kn or €1.70!

Book your hotel here!

DINNER:

I can't remember where ate this meal, but it was lovely! Croatia - a basic guide to food!
I can’t remember where ate this meal, but it was lovely! Croatia – a basic guide to food!

For dinner, we always strive to patronise interesting traditional-inspired restaurants. For this, we don’t scrimp, but use the opportunity to sample all that is good in Croatian cuisine.

We wanted to eat in Gornji Grad – the Old Town – The restaurant that we had our eye on was situated between the church of St. Mark, the Natural History Museum, the Museum of the City of Zagreb, and not far off from the Museum of Broken Relationships!

However, without a reservation, or a large number of heads, it proved extremely difficult to get a nice seat, or any seat at all! Of course, if you’re happy to be tucked in the outside patio, far from the action, or where you couldn’t see a thing then…

Er. Nope! I didn’t come all this way to be hidden away.

We decided to come again the next day, and this time we succeeded!

Dalmatian uštipak – fried doughnut balls – served with kajmak – Croatian clotted cream cheese ‘cos of the less-than-stellar service!

It’s a tavern-like place that is influenced by a mixture of Bosnian-Herzegovinian and Mediterranean cuisine. Sadly, the service wasn’t the best and neither was the food. Both The Music Producer and The Tall Young Gentleman enjoyed their dinner, but I didn’t!

  • The above dish of Dalmatian uštipak – fried doughnut balls – served with kajmak – Croatian clotted cream cheese was served On the House, ‘cos of the less-than-stellar service! Bought at Konoba Didov San – Gornji Grad, in Zagreb. Cost: 0.00kn or €0.00
Grilled eel with a nice side dish of roast potatoes, in Zagreb – Croatia!
  • The meal above was a dish of grilled eel with a nice side dish of roast potatoes. Bought at Konoba Didov San – Gornji Grad, in Zagreb. Cost: 130kn or €18.00
  • Wild asparagus
  • Dried pork loin and sausage with pickled cabbage
I'm not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a "cup" of roast potatoes!
I’m not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a “cup” of roast potatoes!

I’ve become quite European in nature so that I’m quite picky. In Zagreb, this could lead to not finding a place to eat!

  • Luckily, we found a nice little outfit which was small, and had a trendy bar and bistro menu. I’m not a fan of burgers so I had a chicken club sandwich consisting of chicken, bacon, grilled ham, onions and tomatoes, with a “cup” of roast potatoes! Bought at Otto & Frank, in Zagreb. Cost: 42kn or €5.60
  • Wild boar
  • Chicken in a wood-fired oven
  • Vitalac – skewered lamb offal
Eating frogs – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
  • Eels and frogs
  • Lamb tripe
  • Artichokes with fava beans

SEAFOOD:

A full seafood lunch of Frigadura, at a unique restaurant within the Square of the City Walls in Split-Croatia! We liked it so much, we went twice!
  • I had a “trayful” of seafood samples or Frigadura at this rather wonderful unique restaurant within one of the Squares of the city walls of Split! In fact, we liked the restaurant so much that we went back twice! My meal consisted of prawns, shrimps, mussels and sardines, served with a portion of french fries and a fancy tureen of whitefish sauce! Bought at the cute restaurant Bepa! in Split. Cost: 95kn or €12.80
  • Crab
  • Oysters

I adore seafood so we went to a little sailing harbour in Split and found a lovely place. It was packed with Croatian locals, Italians, and lots of families with their teenage children! I was already impressed as teenagers can be so picky, but discerning!

Pasta and seafood in Split. Oh my!
  • We all had pasta seafood dishes. My Tagliatelle came with mussels, shrimps, prawns and bits of lobster in a tomato sauce. Delish! Bought at the sailing restaurant Konoba – Barkarola in Split. Cost: 75kn or €11.00
Pickled seafood – Croatia – a basic guide to food
King Prawns – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
St. Jacobs scallops with spinach risotto – Croatia – a basic guide to food!
  • Scampi
  • Butarga – salted, cured fish roe
  • Spiny lobster

DESSERT:

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

On our second night in Croatia, we went to a restaurant that is located in one of the oldest streets in the city’s old centre. In a basement that is over 300 years old! Unfortunately, the lighting was too “soft” to take good photos so I only have a picture of dessert!

Istrian custard or flawn, presented with berries & cream in Zagreb – Croatia!
Chocolate cake in Dubrovnik – Croatia. Eww!
  • I hate chocolate cake, but if you like it, help yourself in Dubrovnik. Eww!! Eaten at GUSTA ME restaurant in Dubrovnik – press lunch – As part of an Easter brunch three-course menu – retail price – 160kn or €21.00
Ice cream in Zagreb – Croatia!

Who doesn’t love ice-cream? I’m always having to be careful ‘cos of the liberal sprinkling of nuts that I seem to see everywhere these days, and the combination of chocolate! The former ‘cos I have a nut allergy, and the latter ‘cos I don’t like chocolate! I read about a trendy ice-cream parlour in the Time Out Zagreb magazine, so off we went.

  • The ice-cream parlour didn’t let us down. Bought at Millennium in Zagreb. Cost: 9kn per ice-cream scoop or €1.25!!!
  • Sweet pastries

DRINKS & REFRESHMENTS:

This glass of beer was quaffed on our Dubrovnik apartment terrace, and was a gift from our Croatian landlord!

The food culture in Croatia, as in many other Mediterranean States is that of outdoor, al fresco dining. The weather generally tends to be warm and summery, and the lifestyle in the country tends to be more relaxed.

You can, and should, take little breaks, have a snack, or a drink. The cost is relatively peanuts, and the quality is great. In fact, I found  that in many places, the cost of a taxi-ride was even cheaper than three (3) glasses of wine and a cup of coffee!

Al fresco dining in Croatia is great. So why shouldn’t you indulge?

So why shouldn’t you indulge?

Croatia has a variety of freshly – squeezed juice. Be careful when you order “lemonade” as The Tall Young Gentleman was surprised to receive freshly squeezed lemon, when actually what he wanted was Schweppes!

A refreshing jar of ginger-ale in Split – Croatia!
  • Here’s a refreshing jar of ginger-ale. Cost: 25kn or €3.40

Have a beverage at the many bars, restaurants and cafés that can be found on the very long street packed shoulder-to-shoulder!

NOTE! In the daytime, stroll around and take your pick, but by nightfall know that if you’re in Zagreb and you’re as picky as I am, you’ll probably not get to eat!

The establishments have different names but tend to belong to the same group. There might also be a very long wait for service. Make sure you keep the waiter in view so that he can keep the drinks coming. It’s expected that with each order, you pay on the spot, then order again.

A cold glass of coca-cola in Zagreb – Croatia!

You can also have:

  • Lovran chestnuts. Yuck!
  • Pag cheese
You can go to the lake in Split-Croatia, and have yourself a Karlovacko beer!
  • Home-grown Karlovačko beer
  • Staro Češko – from the Czech minority living in Croatia
  • Riječko pivo
  • Tomislav
How to visit the Balkans: Introducing Croatia – the dream of Game of Thrones!
  • Ožujsko
  • Velebitsko pivo
  • Pivo Toceno
  • Osječko: from the Osijek – the oldest brewery in Croatia!
Wine at lunch in Zagreb – Croatia!

Croatian wine has a history dating back to the Ancient Greek settlers, and many traditional grape varieties still survive. However, at first glance, many restaurants would offer me Italian or French wine instead! Insist on the local variety, which I found perfectly up to par.

  • The glass of red wine bought above at Kitchen & Gruill PLAC was cheaper than a (15kn or €2.00) glass of Schweppes!!! Cost: 9kn or €1.25!!!
  • Teran wine
  • Zlahtina from Vrbnik wine
  • Maraschino liqueur
  • Babic wine
  • Marastina wine
Semberg Rosé wine in Split-Croatia
  • The Semberg Rosé wine above was bought at restaurant Bepa! Cost: 45kn or €6.50
  • Debit wine
  • Plavac Mali wine
  • Dobricic wine
  • Vugava wine
  • Bogdanusa wine
  • Prosek wine
  • Posip wine
  • dubrovnic malvasia wine
  • Grk wine

I could go on and on, but I ought to leave something for you to discover, don’t you think?

That’s it for now.

See you next week!

Book your hotel or apartment here!

CROATIA – A BASIC GUIDE TO FOOD!

Croatian beer & Croatian coffee – Croatia – a basic guide to food!

This article is not sponsored and all opinions and the wonderful traditional food that we sampled, are my very own!

In May & June, I’ll be visiting Sweden and Slovenia!

From May 17th – May 20th, I’ll be at the Berlin Music Video Awards.

From July 4th – July 7th, I’ll be at Berlin Fashion Week. It’s going to be awesome!

I’ll be there. Will you?

If you’re not in Berlin in May, you’re crazy!

Save the Date!

May & June are going to be thrilling!

Croatian cold cuts & cheese – Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

Please note that there are now affiliate links (for the very first time) connected to this post. Please consider using the links, because every time some sort of accommodation or travel insurance is booked via my links I get a little percentage, but at no extra cost to yourself!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

Croatia – a basic guide to food!

Have you ever had Croatian food? Would you try lamb tripe or eels and frogs? Let me know in the comments below!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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‘Just because I don’t drink coffee. ‘Doesn’t mean I can’t have coffee culture with hot chocolate, in Vienna!

‘Just because I don’t drink coffee. ‘Doesn’t mean I can’t have coffee culture with hot chocolate, in Vienna!

As you know, a few weeks ago, I went to Austria.

And of course, I didn’t just go to Austria, but I decided to visit Vienna!

Visiting Vienna is exciting!

Having a hotdog and beer, on a rainy day in Vienna, is more exciting than you think!

If you’re just joining, and obviously, you’re not, ‘cos you would be following my blog so that you can get weekly updates of what The British Berliner is up to, wouldn’t you?

Wouldn’t you!

However, let’s not quibble, just look to the side of the page and you’ll see a few ways which you can follow this wonderful blog. You can either click on You are following this blog or if you’re a WordPress nerd, just clink on the WordPress symbol followed by Following the British Berliner.

At the Vienna Opera Ball.
@ WienTourismus / Peter Rigaud/Couture Vivienne Westwood

Meanwhile, here’s what you missed:

Phew!

Make sure that you get travel insurance before you actually travel!

Now, to be frank, I hate being out of the loop, and I generally prefer to be in the centre of things, and that usually includes staying in the Old Town, or the trendier part of town!

And Vienna didn’t disappoint.

We stayed at a brilliant place called the 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier, which I found with the help of the Vienna Tourist Board.

We stayed at a brilliant place in Vienna – the 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier.
Photograph ©Frank Böster

Thanks so much everyone!

Book your hotel here!

Vienna is an imperial beauty. You’re welcome!

I’ve already written about the history of Vienna, but it really does bear to be repeated.

Vienna is an imperial beauty!

It’s the capital of Austria and the cultural. economic, and political centre of Austria.

With a population of just 1.8 million, Vienna is the second (2nd) largest German-speaking city in the world, after Berlin!

Vienna is located in the eastern part of Austria and is close to the borders of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. In fact, Prague, Bratislava, and Budapest, are but a few cheap hours away!

TAKE ME THERE?

Myself looking glum at the airport. Leaving Vienna!
Photograph ©Frank Böster

As you know, I’m a great believer in train travel, but Vienna is rather far from Berlin, so we flew!

Our non-stop journey from Berlin Schoenefeld (SXF) to Vienna (VIE) took just 1 hour and 25 minutes via EasyJet, but of course, you can easily fly into Vienna International Airport, otherwise known as the Flughafen Wien, a destination flown by many major airlines, from many parts of the world!

If you’re flying from Europe, it usually takes between 1 to 2 hours, and is pretty much an easy ride!

IS IT GOING TO BE CROWDED?

I didn’t find it crowded in Vienna. And neither did they!

It depends!

I didn’t find it to be necessarily so, as we went in March.

It’s been some time since I had last been to Vienna, so we booked a walking tour. But the tour guide didn’t show up!

We were all sort of hanging around, and (ahem), I’m quite bossy and so at one point, everyone thought that I was the tour guide.

If only!

Mind you, if we were in Berlin and that happened, I would happily take the tourists with me, and do the tour myself!

Me in front of a piece of the Berlin Wall & Street Art!

However, Vienna is a place that everyone would like to go to at least once, as it’s rather nice and serene!

Who wouldn’t want to visit?

‘Best to book early!

WHAT IS VIENNA LIKE?

Mozart & Vienna are adorable!

It’s adorable!

I’ve been there a few times over the years!

Having said that, the last time that I was in Vienna, “The Tall Young Gentleman” had just been born twelve (12) months prior!

My mother-in-law had decided to give me a weekend break, so I was in Vienna and literally, still breast-feeding!!!

A Viennese speciality of a glass of beer mixed with fanta orange, was not a very good idea!

I had tried a Viennese speciality of a glass of beer mixed with fanta orange. A sort of shandy.

It was a mistake.

We went to the Prater.

The Prater is one of Vienna’s most popular amusement park, and it’s star is the Giant Ferris Wheel!

The Prater is one of Vienna’s most popular leisure areas with a world-famous amusement park opened in 1766!

One of the highlights of the Prater is the Giant Ferris Wheel – a masterpiece of 19th century technology – and one of the largest wheels in the world!

Did we go on the Giant Ferris Wheel back in 2003?

Nope!

We went on the wheel called the Blumenrad, otherwise known as the Flower Wheel!
Photograph ©Frank Böster

We went on the wheel called the Blumenrad, otherwise known as the Flower Wheel!

The seats are shaped like huge teacups which were twirled around.

And around.

And around.

I turned a ghastly shade of green!

I turned a ghastly shade of green.

Let’s just say that it took a huge amount of effort for me to keep things together.

We got off the Blumenrad, and I vomited the wheat beer and fanta orange concoction.

Everywhere!

We went on the Blumenrad / Flower Wheel, but we really should have gone on the Giant Ferris Wheel instead!
Photograph ©Frank Böster

I’ve never had a mixed beer since!

I DON’T SPEAK AUSTRIAN GERMAN or GERMAN AT ALL.

Singing will do just as well!
©WienTourismus Lukas Beck: Vienna Boys’ Choir

Not. A. Problem.

Lots of people speak English. Or High German, otherwise known as Hochdeutsche!

AM I GOING TO LIVE IN A HUT?

Living in a hut, is not at all the done thing. In Vienna!

Ha! Ha! Not unless you want to!

I’M ON A BUDGET. WHAT SHOULD I DO?

If you’re on a budget in Vienna. Let them eat cake!

I’ll be honest with you. Vienna isn’t known as a cheap destination.

Quite the opposite in fact!

I can’t give you any details but for the more budget conscious traveller, there are plenty of hostels and other moderately priced accommodation to be had. Book ahead to get good prices.

Book your hotel here!

I’M LOOKING FOR SOMETHING A BIT DIFFERENT. ANY IDEAS?

I got into contact with a quirky boutique hotel group called 25 Hours Hotels!

Certainly!

You know how much I like boutique  or art design hotels.

Well, on doing some research, I got into contact with a quirky boutique hotel group called 25hours Hotels.

The 25hours Hotels is a young hotel concept which seeks contemporary answers to the requirements of an urban, cosmopolitan clientele, boasting an unconventional mix of contemporary services, coupled with dynamism, surprise and a touch of adventure!

The 25hours brand is currently focused on Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

We went to the 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier.

The 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier, is an art design circus-themed boutique hotel!

Just like the hotel in Amsterdam Zaandam, the 25hours Hotels’ quirkiness is plain to see.

Practically every single room had some sort of association with the circus!

And with one of the hotel motto’s being – We Are All Mad Here – is it any wonder that it was pretty much my type of place!

And surely, there wouldn’t be any looking at the ceiling in boredom, here!

We Are All Mad Here!
The 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier.
©Stephan Lemke for 25hours Hotels

As we were in Vienna to celebrate my husband – The Music Producers’ – birthday, we were upgraded to one of the xl rooms, with a colourful circus theme on the wall!

The room was huge!

It also had a flat screen TV, a free-standing closet place to hang up clothes with long shelves, an imac workstation writing table, a cool vintage sound system bluetooth speaker, an iPod docking station, some leather pouffles, a private terrace with a wooden garden table and chairs, and lots of plug outlets.

My husband was very pleased!

We were upgraded to one of the xl rooms, with a colourful circus theme on the wall!

There was a small fridge, and an extra toilet, so that I could do my make up in peace. Yay!

The bathroom was a sort of internal interior space with a huge sink, a really nice rainshower compartment that had a glass panel, which also had a curtain that could be drawn.

If you so wished!

I very much liked the orange and lemon infused sustainable organic bath gels, shampoo, conditioner and body moisturiser, which all had hilarious save-the-environment instructions on the bottles! And at the end of a long day were awfully welcoming, as well as plenty of fluffy towels, and free hi-speed WiFi!

I did miss my fluffy dressing gowns and fluffy slippers though!

‘Notice the save-the-environment inscription on the bottle at the 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier!
©Stephan Lemke for 25hours Hotels

The 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier also had a “mermaid’s cave” which consisted of a sauna, a spa centre, and fitness equipment, free of charge to guests.

You could also have access to a free mini car and bike rental, as well as free bottled water and towels, if you wanted to go jogging!

The view on the rooftop bar of the 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier, is pretty amazing!
©Stephan Lemke for 25hours Hotels

The lobby was very nice with comfy leather sofas, crisp daily newspapers and glossy magazines. There was also a hotel food truck in the garden.

Being that the hotel is actually located in the Museum Quartier part of the city, the view on the rooftop bar, was pretty amazing!

Breakfast in Vienna was quite marvellous!

For breakfast, we had marvellous cold cuts, bacon, sausages, eggs, and baked beans, a variety of sea-food, vegetables, sauces, and cream. As well as a wide stock of cereal, fruit, cake, pastries, pots of tea, coffee local champagne, and juices.

They also had a wonderful array of crunchy Germanic and French home-made bread, and a variety of jams and pickles! Yum!

It was very nice indeed!

The Music Producer helping himself to morning refreshment, at the 25hours Hotel Vienna at MuseumsQuartier.

The 25hours Hotel at MuseumsQuartier (depending on the room), can be booked from €97.00 per night, which for two (2) people would be €48.50 a pop, and an absolute Vienna bargain!

The buffet breakfast is €21.00 per person. Children up to 6 years old are free of charge. Children from 7 to 11 years old get a 50% discount. Guests can also buy a Grab & Go breakfast from the lobby for €7.00 per person.

Book your hotel here!

WHAT ABOUT TRANSPORT POSSIBILITIES?

Take the tram in Vienna!

Transport in Vienna is excellent.

The trams and horses are romantic, and the trains are easy to use, and very efficient.

You can also walk around quite easily, as Vienna is pretty small!

Once again, don’t forget to buy a public transport Vienna card. However, for ease of transport and discounts to attractions, museums, and restaurants, we used the Vienna City Card for 72 hours. Tickets can be bought everywhere that tourists go to, tourist information  points, and on-line!

However, just like in Berlin, and in many European cities, there are no barriers, and we all want to keep it that way, so please buy your ticket!

ANYTHING ELSE?

Apple strudel is a very important part of Viennese coffee culture!

Apple strudel is king!

MY VERDICT:

Vienna Tourist Board. Now. Forever.

I absolutely adore Vienna.

It’s classy.

It’s European.

It’s got art and culture and has a vibrant history.

And even though Vienna is considered to be expensive. It’s not as expensive as you think!

WOULD I COME AGAIN?

‘Just because I don’t drink coffee. ‘Doesn’t mean I can’t have coffee culture with hot chocolate, in Vienna!

You bet!

Vienna is charming.

I really can’t wait to visit again.

Let’s do it!

JUST BECAUSE I DON’T DRINK COFFEE. ‘DOESN’T MEAN I CAN’T HAVE COFFEE CULTURE WITH HOT CHOCOLATE, IN VIENNA!

‘Just because I don’t drink coffee. ‘Doesn’t mean I can’t have coffee culture with hot chocolate, in Vienna!

This article is part – sponsored by the Vienna Tourist Board and I received a press discount from the 25 Hours Hotels but all opinions and the wonderful hot chocolate and delightful Austrian food I happily consumed, are my very own! Thanks so much!

It’s almost Easter!

In April & May, I’ll be visiting Croatia, Sweden & Finland!

I’ll be there. Will you?

If you’re not in Berlin in April, you won’t get any Easter eggs!

'Just because I don't drink coffee. 'Doesn't mean I can't have coffee culture with hot chocolate, in Vienna!
‘Just because I don’t drink coffee. ‘Doesn’t mean I can’t have coffee culture with hot chocolate, in Vienna!

Watch this space!

Note! I never travel without insurance as you never know what might happen.

I learnt my lesson in Spain. And obviously, in countries like Qatar, where technically the risk is higher, I can’t imagine going that far beyond, WITHOUT INSURANCE. No siree! You can get yours here, at World Nomads!

A win-win for all!

Thanks a million!

‘Just because I don’t drink coffee. ‘Doesn’t mean I can’t have coffee culture with hot chocolate, in Vienna!

Are you a coffee drinker? Or are you like me, a person who can’t bear the sight of it! Spill the beans!

See you in Berlin.

If you have any questions send me a tweet, talk to me on Facebook, find me on Linkedin, make a comment below, look for me on Google+ or send me an Email: victoria@thebritishberliner.com

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